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In Stock at photo-eye: Signed


Books In Stock at photo-eye: Signed Four signed titles from Mark Mattock, Jonah Samson, Robin Maddock and Jill Hartley.


Photographs by Mark Mattock
$70.00 — Purchase Book

With a title referencing the 1976 film about an extra-terrestrial looking for water, The Angler Who Fell to Earth brings together a seemingly disparate selection of images that pull closer and closer together on each reading. Full of subtle connections and clever image pairings, the sense of water and the figure of the angler are everywhere to be found; in photographs of rivers and fishermen and even in the texture of a horse's fur or the elements of a construction site. Mattock likens the creation of his photobooks to making music, assembling "visual riffs" until the pieces come together. Color, form, composition and theme criss-cross, creating a visual narrative that continually gets richer.

fotoTaroc, also from Hartley, is another riff on a traditional game, this time, the tarot. Here, the link is looser; instead of 78 cards, Hartley presents the viewer with 88, and unlike the traditional tarot, they are unlabeled and unnumbered. While an observer with some knowledge of the symbolism of the tarot can find some overlapping of imagery, Hartley's fotoTaroc is a game of chance and free association. Saturated color images show a variety of objects, items and scenes, each beautiful in its own right, but intriguing when paired and re-ordered; they are images open for interpretation and association. In a small booklet that accompanies the cards, Hartley explains how the game is to be played: three cards are selected and laid face up, then, "paying close attention to first impressions, he or she must look for a personal message in the images as if interpreting a dream or deciphering destiny." - See more at: http://blog.photoeye.com/2012/04/loose-plates-loteria-fotografica.html#sthash.Zb488Ets.dpuf




By Jonah Samson
$125.00 — Purchase Book

Selected as a Best Book of 2013 by Erin Azouz

"Samson's fascination with mid-century crime photography and pin-ups comes to life in a creative and compelling fiction in Dead Man's Hand. Comprised of loose plate photographs over-painted by the artist, a narrative written by Sheila Heti, pin-up photographs, clippings from detective magazines and rap sheets, the entire loose-plate book is housed in a hand-made linen box. The presentation draws the viewer in, inviting us to solve a fictional crime with the 'evidence' presented to us in this treasure trove of material." —Erin Azouz






Our Kids Are Going to Hell
Photographs by Robin Maddock, text by Ian Sinclair
$65.00 — Purchase Book

The first book from English photographer Robin Maddock, Our Kids Are Going to Hell features three years of photographs made while shadowing police officers doing their work in east London. Maddock's photographs look specifically at the troubling state of British youth, who, according to a 2007 UNICEF study on child well-being, are at the most risk of any industrialized country. Combined with text from Iain Sinclair, Maddock's images are most powerful in their ability to capture the pervasive atmosphere of the raids, arrests, and homes they picture. The emotionally resonant images don't tell a single story, but give dimension to a systemic problem.






fotoTaroc
By Jill Hartley
$100 — Purchase Book                                                                                                                                                                                            

fotoTaroc from Jill Hartley is a riff on the traditional the tarot. Instead of 78 cards, Hartley presents the viewer with 88, and unlike the traditional tarot, they are unlabeled and unnumbered. While an observer with some knowledge of the symbolism of the tarot can find some overlapping of imagery, Hartley's fotoTaroc is a game of chance and free association. Saturated color images show a variety of objects, items and scenes, each beautiful in its own right, but intriguing when paired and re-ordered; they are images open for interpretation and association. In a small booklet that accompanies the cards, Hartley explains how the game is to be played: three cards are selected and laid face up, then, "paying close attention to first impressions, he or she must look for a personal message in the images as if interpreting a dream or deciphering destiny."

fotoTaroc, also from Hartley, is another riff on a traditional game, this time, the tarot. Here, the link is looser; instead of 78 cards, Hartley presents the viewer with 88, and unlike the traditional tarot, they are unlabeled and unnumbered. While an observer with some knowledge of the symbolism of the tarot can find some overlapping of imagery, Hartley's fotoTaroc is a game of chance and free association. Saturated color images show a variety of objects, items and scenes, each beautiful in its own right, but intriguing when paired and re-ordered; they are images open for interpretation and association. In a small booklet that accompanies the cards, Hartley explains how the game is to be played: three cards are selected and laid face up, then, "paying close attention to first impressions, he or she must look for a personal message in the images as if interpreting a dream or deciphering destiny." - See more at: http://blog.photoeye.com/2012/04/loose-plates-loteria-fotografica.html#sthash.Zb488Ets.dpuf
fotoTaroc, also from Hartley, is another riff on a traditional game, this time, the tarot. Here, the link is looser; instead of 78 cards, Hartley presents the viewer with 88, and unlike the traditional tarot, they are unlabeled and unnumbered. While an observer with some knowledge of the symbolism of the tarot can find some overlapping of imagery, Hartley's fotoTaroc is a game of chance and free association. Saturated color images show a variety of objects, items and scenes, each beautiful in its own right, but intriguing when paired and re-ordered; they are images open for interpretation and association. In a small booklet that accompanies the cards, Hartley explains how the game is to be played: three cards are selected and laid face up, then, "paying close attention to first impressions, he or she must look for a personal message in the images as if interpreting a dream or deciphering destiny." - See more at: http://blog.photoeye.com/2012/04/loose-plates-loteria-fotografica.html#sthash.Zb488Ets.dpuf
fotoTaroc, also from Hartley, is another riff on a traditional game, this time, the tarot. Here, the link is looser; instead of 78 cards, Hartley presents the viewer with 88, and unlike the traditional tarot, they are unlabeled and unnumbered. While an observer with some knowledge of the symbolism of the tarot can find some overlapping of imagery, Hartley's fotoTaroc is a game of chance and free association. Saturated color images show a variety of objects, items and scenes, each beautiful in its own right, but intriguing when paired and re-ordered; they are images open for interpretation and association. In a small booklet that accompanies the cards, Hartley explains how the game is to be played: three cards are selected and laid face up, then, "paying close attention to first impressions, he or she must look for a personal message in the images as if interpreting a dream or deciphering destiny." - See more at: http://blog.photoeye.com/2012/04/loose-plates-loteria-fotografica.html#sthash.Zb488Ets.dpuf

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