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Book Review Hot Damn! Photographs by Chloe Sells Reviewed by Blake Andrews “Like an acid tab slipped under the tongue, Chloe Sells’ Hot Damn! comes on rather quickly. Everything seems ho-hum at first, just another photobook, this one unearthing bygone odds and ends — some sort of party house apparently, or a writer’s retreat? Pictures of wood-paneled rooms and hand-jotted papers are presented with the warm tint of old slide film. The reader figures their backstory will soon be unveiled. But before that can happen the walls begin to drip, and the book veers toward a psychedelic rabbit hole..."

Hot Damn! By Chloe Sells.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=IG130
Hot Damn!
Photographs by Chloe Sells

GOST Books, London, UK, 2022. 184 pp., 8¼x11½x¾".

Like an acid tab slipped under the tongue, Chloe Sells’ Hot Damn! comes on rather quickly. Everything seems ho-hum at first, just another photobook, this one unearthing bygone odds and ends — some sort of party house apparently, or a writer’s retreat? Pictures of wood-paneled rooms and hand-jotted papers are presented with the warm tint of old slide film. The reader figures their backstory will soon be unveiled. But before that can happen the walls begin to drip, and the book veers toward a psychedelic rabbit hole. 

The first hints of strangeness come with a picture of a snowy cabin and carport. It’s been tilted, cropped, and split around the page edge. The next photo is awash in lava lamp swirls, and the ones just beyond are even more mangled. Before long, these minor anomalies have exploded into a full-blown trip. A rush of patterns, obfuscation, and bright colors come in succession, settling into the photobook equivalent of an Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. With no explanatory captions or text (these don’t appear until the very end) the reader is on their own to sort things out. It’s probably best to just buckle in and enjoy the ride. This thing could last all night.

If Hot Damn! is LSD-inspired, the design is an homage to its primary subject, Hunter S. Thompson. The late great father of Gonzo journalism was among the more notorious — and highest functioning — druggies in literary history. His pill-popping exploits are legendary, but alas their translation into creative content has proven tricky. How best to convey his mindset, his presence, his manic charisma to a sober audience? It might be impossible. Nevertheless, Terry Gilliam gave it a shot directing the 1998 adaptation of Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, a hallucinatory romp spinning out of control at every turn. If you enjoyed that film, Hot Damn! might be considered an aesthetic cousin, with a firmer tie to reality (these are old snapshots, after all, not a Hollywood set), and rooted to the foundation of Thompson’s Aspen cabin.


His home was known colloquially as Owl Farm, and for two years Chloe Sells had first-hand access to its inner workings. An Aspen native, she was hired by his wife as Hunter S. Thompson’s personal assistant in 2003. She spent most nights on the job until his suicide 2 years later. As Sells writes in Hot Damn!’s afterword, by this point in Thompson’s career, “almost his whole life had been documented — except for his home — the ramshackle, remarkable creative heartland that was Owl Farm. It needed to be visually archived, he said to me, and it was mine to photograph if I liked.”  She took up his offer with relish, categorically documenting his posters, shelves, mementos, TVs, and rooms. Gradually she compiled loads of film, which she stashed away for later. If she didn’t delve into the material at the time, Thompson still made an indelible impression. “He was as bright as they come,” she writes. Elsewhere she declares him, “an unremitting genius.”

With Hot Damn! Sells has opened a belated window — or perhaps a kaleidoscope? — into that genius. Finally, we can see what made Raoul Duke tick. As with any old snaps, these casual moments contain a wealth of raw information and insights. There are posters of Thompson’s campaign for Aspen Sheriff (running on the “Freak Power” ticket, he was unsuccessful), old typewriters, bulletin boards, kitchen decor, pharmaceuticals, screens blaring porn, and other hints of Aspen’s “hedonistic, bohemian lifestyle” (Sells’ description). Photos of old dishes and containers have a ritualized sensibility, while motivational notes tacked to walls bear the hallmarks of a writer’s residence. Thompson’s 1990 arrest warrant is here (Unlawful Possession — a case which eventually crumbled), while yellowed interiors bounded by snowbound peaks convey the lonely remove of a mountain cabin.


All are informative, the photographic equivalent of poking through someone’s private locker. But deciphering these old scenes is not easy. The main obstacle is that, as mentioned above, most pictures have been obscured by Sells with marble swirls and splotches. Between various colored gels, layering, stains, cuts, and tilts, the original contents are largely transformed or buried. Perhaps that’s just as well. There’s enough data to capture Thompson’s day-to-day lifestyle, while less tangible evidence is captured in after effects. 

Not only is the psychedelic treatment suitable for Thompson, it fits seamlessly with Sells’ oeuvre. Since her early training at RISD (where she earned a BFA just before working for Thompson), and MFA, she has become an accomplished fine art photographer, making her mark with analog C-prints made in a darkroom, typically dressed in odd trimmings and surface applications. The marbled striations in Hot Damn! might look peculiar to the initiated. But for Chloe Sells they’re par for the course, a natural extension of earlier projects. Looking back now at the winding path of her career, it’s tempting to trace its main currents back to Owl Farm. This book and this time period might hold a special place in her heart. But that’s mere speculation from an outside observer.


Hot Damn!
is a dense monograph packed with images, with scant blank pages or restful moments. I never encountered Hunter S. Thompson in real life, but by all accounts he was an intense person, so it makes sense for a biography (which this is, in a way) to read as an immersive experience. The photos are impressionistic and unrelenting. They eventually leave the reader so scrambled that a debriefing is required. Thankfully this comes at the end with an illustrated index of selected thumbnail images from the book, each captioned with a personal anecdote by Sells. It’s well written and entertaining. Even better yet is the accompanying account of her job experience and her impressions of Thompson. All provide much needed context. The fact that they were held back until the end is a nod to Thompson’s modus operandi: embrace life as it comes, then sort out the meaning later. In other words, buckle in and enjoy the ride. This thing could last all night.

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Blake Andrews is a photographer based in Eugene, OR. He writes about photography at blakeandrews.blogspot.com.
photo-eye Gallery From the Flat Files - A Natural Celebration Delaney Hoffman This week photo-eye Gallery is thrilled to present a selection of images that pay homage to the natural world and the creatures that inhabit it. In the spirit of Seeing Through Fire, we are reveling in these photographs based in landscape and invite you to do the same!
Brad Wilson, Barn Owl #1, Saint Louis, MO, 2012, Archival pigment print, 22x29", Edition of 15, $2000

Since partnering with artists Carl Moore and Patricia Galagan for our Seeing Through Fire fundraiser for disaster relief in New Mexico, we here at photo-eye have been extra grateful for the stunning images of the natural world that surround us in our space every day.

From Brad Wilson's stunning studio portraits of animals housed in conservancies to Tom Chambers' haunting, constructed compositions that engage in the continually shifting relationship between humans and our environment, our artists' perspectives and approaches are wide reaching, but they're all rooted in a deep reverence for the creatures and landforms that inhabit the world with us. 

With that sentiment in mind, we've curated a selection of photographs that are all available for view in our flat files that speak to how much we love our landscape. Check them out below, and don't forget that the Seeing Through Fire fundraiser runs through July 1, 2022!


The majority of proceeds from Seeing Through Fire will be donated to Santa Fe's Food Depot and Humane Society as both serve displaced humans and animals from around New Mexico!






Edward Bateman, Leaf No. 39c2, 2019, Archival pigment print, 20x20" in 28x28" mat, Edition of 7, $875

Tom Chambers, Burn to Shine, 2013 Archival pigment print, 20x20", Edition of 20, $1400

Chaco Terada, For the Anniversary, Sumi ink and pigment ink on silk, 9.5x7" image in 20x16" mat, Unique, $1800

Beth Moon, Black Crested Polish, Platinum/palladium print, 7.5x6", Edition of 9, $950



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Print costs are current up to the time of posting and are subject to change.

photo-eye Gallery is proud to represent Beth Moon, Chaco Terada, Tom Chambers and Brad Wilson. Edward Bateman is a Photographer's Showcase artist.

For more information, and to purchase prints from any artists mentioned above please contact Gallery Director Anne Kelly or Gallery Assistant Jovi Esquivel, or you may also call us at 505-988-5152 x202

Book Review Heliotropo 37 Photographs by Graciela Iturbide Reviewed by Laura Larson "Organized by the Fondacion Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Heliotropo 37 presents an overview of Graciela Iturbide’s prolific career. The book catalogs her best-known projects including Los Que Viven en la Arena (Those Who Live in the Sand), a series..."

By Graciela Iturbide.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DU331
Heliotropo 37
Photographs by Graciela Iturbide

Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain, 2022. 304 pp., 250 illustrations, 9¼x11½".

Organized by the Fondacion Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Heliotropo 37 presents an overview of Graciela Iturbide’s prolific career. The book catalogs her best-known projects including Los Que Viven en la Arena (Those Who Live in the Sand), a series of the Indigenous Seri people living in the Sonora Desert; Juchitán (The Women of Juchitán), which focuses on the female-centered Zapotec culture of Oaxaca; and Naturata (Nature), photographs of Jardín Botánica de Oaxaca. In addition, the Fondacion commissioned a series of photographs produced in Tecali, a village close to Puebla in Mexico. In a departure from her signature black-and-white, Iturbide photographed alabaster and onyx slabs in color during the process of mining and polishing the stones. The images of these immense forms, strangely poised between the organic and the man-made, act as an introduction. Heliotropo 37 takes its title from her studio address in Mexico City, a structure designed by her son, the architect Mauricio Rocha. Photographed by Pablo López Luz, the building is an adamantly private space; its edifice is constructed of solid brick and its interiors blend the domestic with the trappings of a studio. It’s fitting that this survey is housed within a structure that reads as a character study, a portrait in absentia.


The book is ostensibly organized in sections that represent these distinct projects, yet its editing departs from partitioning of subject to generously alight into the shared spaces between. As such, two distinct pulls structure the book’s sequencing — the desire to bestow order to her catalog and to find an editorial form for her searching gaze; a rebellious and welcome impulse against the chronological. Iturbide is attuned to cultural detail — there’s an anthropological tug to her work — but her gaze seeks the ineffable.

Birds glide through Iturbide’s photographs, an animating line through the book — swarming, swooping, floating, piercing the sky. In Pájaros (Nueva Delhi, India, 1998), a man with a bandaged head and cane in hand walks through a trash-strewn landscape. He is dwarfed by a swarm hovering over him, like a crowded thought bubble. Three birds fly triangulated over a group of four, earth-bound dogs (three with question mark tails!) in Perros perdidos (Rajastán, India, 1998), fusing earth and sky, substance and shadow. In a pair of images, Pájaros en el poste de luz and Árbol de pájaros (Both Carretera a Guanajuato, México, 1990), clouds of birds bloom over a telephone line and tree respectively, as if born from these other forms.


These aerial silhouettes connect to another enduring theme, the shroud and the mask, summoning Iturbide’s preoccupation with mortality. She moves easily between documentation, as seen in the recurring imagery of Day of the Dead masks and their ritual uses, to veiling as a figurative strategy. Even objects receive this melancholic attention: a sedan covered in a flowered bedsheet, a block of ice draped in a dark towel, the cacti of Jardín Botánica swathed in newspaper. This strategy takes its most dramatic form in her use of animals as masks. ¿Ojos para volar? (Coyoacán, México, 1991) shows Iturbide’s head reclined back, positioning two birds whose heads align with her eyes. The head of the bird on the right optically fuses with her eye in a gesture of blinding, its skull shadows as an empty socket. In another self-portrait, she holds a small fish over her mouth, pulling it close to the contour of her face, as she looks off-camera. (Pachuca, México, 1995)

In an interview with TK, Iturbide says: “Everything in life is connected: your pain and your imagination, which can help you forget reality. What you are living is connected to what you dream about, and what you dream about is connected to what you do, and photographs remain lasting reminders of this.” Iturbide’s capacious gaze offers matter and metaphor, seeing the mythological in the detail of experience and Heliotropo 37 gives flight to her grounded and spiritual sensibility.

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Laura Larson
is a photographer, writer, and teacher based in Columbus, OH. She's exhibited her work extensively, at such venues as Art in General, Bronx Museum of the Arts, Centre Pompidou, Columbus Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, SFCamerawork, and Wexner Center for the Arts and is held in the collections of Allen Memorial Art Museum, Deutsche Bank, Margulies Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Microsoft, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, New York Public Library, and Whitney Museum of American Art. Hidden Mother (Saint Lucy Books, 2017), her first book, was shortlisted for the Aperture-Paris Photo First Photo Book Prize. Larson is currently at work on a new book, City of Incurable Women (forthcoming from Saint Lucy Books) and a collaborative book with writer Christine Hume, All the                                                               Women I Know.
photo-eye Gallery New Images from Keith Carter! Jovi Esquivel This week photo-eye Gallery presents new work by artist and poet, Keith Carter! For this new work, Keith has created extraordinary photographs from explorations made during morning walks, a practice he began during the pandemic through the marshlands west of his hometown, and a series of excursions through the wetlands north of Beaumont, Texas.
Keith Carter, Egret and Crane, 2021, Archival pigment print, 16x16”, Edition of 25, $1600 

Again and again, Keith Carter continues to create transcendent works that leave us in awe! photo-eye Gallery is pleased to announce new work by the artist and poet, made during the pandemic, through the portfolios Ghostlight and Sky & Water. Known for his black-and-white work, part of this new series is presented in color!

For over 50 years, Keith Carter has created images that move beyond the literal through the use of selective focus with scale and perspective often askew, illuminating the intuitive meanings of a scene as would a poet. When asked about the development of his personal photographic voice, Carter once said: “I come out of a documentary tradition, but after a while, I wanted to put my own stamp on things. It became clear, to me, that the subject matter I really cared about had to do with a sense of place, of geography, of the animal world, of the spiritual world and the elements of theology and folklore.”

Transcend through the dramatic effects of light, atmosphere and color found in Sky & Water. Celestial clouds are reflected in bodies of water, obscuring the line where the heavens meet the earth, evoking the sublime qualities found in the landscape paintings from the Romantic era. 

Keith Carter, Lone Pine, 2021, Archival pigment print, 16x16”, Edition of 25, $1600 

Explore wetlands from the south in Ghostlight, where giant trees shrouded in Spanish moss rest within what the artist calls "dark waters."

Keith is known to embark on the occasional "Magical mystery tour," an excursion by airboat on the Angelina River in Texas, where some of the photographs from Ghostlight were made! 


Check out the rest of Keith's Instagram to watch videos of alligators swimming, where I like to imagine the artist made “Turner Clouds,” and read excerpts from photographs like “Illuminated Tree!”


Keep an eye out for an update on the upcoming monograph Ghostlight, due to be released this Fall!

In the meantime, take a look at Keith’s work on our website.



Print costs are current up to the time of posting and are subject to change.

photo-eye Gallery is proud to represent Keith Carter.
For more information, and to purchase prints from Keith Carter 
please contact Gallery Director Anne Kelly or Gallery Assistant Jovi Esquivel, 
or you may also call us at 505-988-5152 x202
Book Review The People's Pictures Photographs by Lee Friedlander Reviewed by Blake Andrews “If you want to portray the American Dream in just one picture, you could do worse than the cover photo of Gillian Laub’s new monograph Family Matters. It shows Laub’s late grandfather Irving Yasgur, engaged with a large cheeseburger and fries. It’s his 85th birthday in 2003 and he’s enjoying the fruits of a long self-made journey into wealthy retirement..."

The People's Pictures. By Lee Friedlander.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DU177
The People's Pictures
Photographs by Lee Friedlander

Eakins Press Foundation, New York, NY 2021. 168 pp., 147 illustrations, 11½x12".

In perhaps his most famous anecdote, Lee Friedlander once described an early experience aiming his camera at a scene before him. “I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day,” he remembers. “I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary’s laundry and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and seventy-eight trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It’s a generous medium, photography.”

The rest, as they say, is history. Sparked in part by that a-ha moment, Friedlander went on to have a prolific career making pictures and books. He’s photographed in every state and several countries, published more than fifty monographs, and he’s still going strong at 87. Through it all his visual appetite has remained supple, feasting at one time or another on virtually every subject imaginable, from cherry blossoms to factories to nudes, flower stems, pedestrians and friends. The popular legend is that he keeps a separate cardboard box for each subject. Occasionally a box results in a monograph. Until then they are open for receiving. He pays no mind to category while shooting. It’s only later that he sorts prints into whatever box is most suitable. Shoot first, ask questions later, repeat as necessary. A generous medium indeed.

As it turns out, one of those boxes held photos of amateur photographers. Friedlander witnessed other shutterbugs regularly in the course of his own wanderings. Film cameras were once commonplace, and they were more photogenic than smartphones. He encountered them being used at public events or landmarks, and sometimes just snapping candids in the kitchen. Most of these photographers were oblivious to him. They were just trying to catch their own bit of Uncle Vern without too much laundry or dog. Friedlander patiently captured them all, just as he did everything in his path. With a few notable exceptions, most have remained unpublished until now.


The latest Friedlander monograph from Eakins Press brings several dozen into the public realm, under the fitting title, The People’s Pictures. In typical Eakins fashion, they are reproduced as impeccable duotones, and collected in a large handsome hardback. It’s a monograph intended for posterity as much as for current readers, a sort of love letter to the act of photography, a capstone to a lifetime of devotion. These pictures of picture-making cover a range of places and dates. They’re sequenced in scattered fashion, hopscotching from place to place, and back and forth from the 1960s to the 2010s. The heaviest emphasis is on the 70s and 80s, perhaps the glory days of a certain style of amateur camera, and the glory days for Friedlander’s own 35 mm forays, before he moved on to the Hassy Superwide.

Friedlander’s visual appetite has always been voracious, but the energy of youth and the freewheeling spirit of the ‘70s elevated him into a special zone during that period. Alongside the mundane social landscapes for which he is perhaps best known, he photographed a seemingly non-stop series of populated events, shows, parties, marches, and speeches. At most of these events were amateurs with cameras, so he obligingly shot them too.


It’s hard to know his exact intentions, but they seem partially motivated by the fact of presence. These photographers were simply there, like Everest. But it’s tempting to read another motivation into his frames: Friedlander’s affinity for the photographic act. Some of the photos peer right over the shoulder of another photographer, as if Friedlander is stepping into their shoes, to soak up some of that good photo feeling vicariously. He’s inches from the primordial act, the bliss of photographic conception. Thumbing The People’s Pictures, one feels the intimacy and immediacy of exposure, the sheer joy of pointing a camera at something, and the anticipation of what it might look like. All have been driving forces throughout Friedlander’s creative life. In these pictures they pull in the same direction for a split second.

But of course, Friedlander being Friedlander, no picture is quite what it first appears to be. A photo of a woman shooting a Leica in a crowd might be a portrait of her. But the frame seems equally concerned with the surrounding faces. Another shutterbug in New Orleans, squatting to frame a scene, might be just be the thing that caught Friedlander’s attention. But it’s hard to say. The surrounding onlookers demand visual attention too. A shot from Thailand blends photographer, arm, and background pagoda into a layered monochrome with impish fun, as does a strangely blended scene from Colorado Springs. All manifest Friedlander’s “mischievous but fundamentally rigorous and unforgiving style,” as once described by the New York Times .


Maybe it’s just me, but these photos seem to possess an outsized Uncle Vern quality which is noteworthy even for Friedlander. That is, they capture not just the primary subject but a wealth of background details, ephemera, and raw information. There is so much pure content to digest in these pictures. Each one is a visual buffet spilling over. It’s a generous medium indeed. And it has been very generous to Lee Friedlander.

Looking at the meta-pictures in this book — pictures of picture-making, essentially — it’s tantalizing to wonder how all those amateur snapshots turned out. It would be wonderful to match them with Friedlander’s photos into a sort of Cubist multi-perspective take on the original scenes.


That’s impossible, of course. Friedlander’s quick impressions must suffice—Not such a bad thing! But for those antsy to see results of some sort, the last third of the book takes a step in that direction. The images switch over from public image-makers to public images, with an assortment of snapshots, posters, signs, and other photographic material found and shot by Friedlander. Windows, shops, billboards, and that sort of thing. For long-time Friedlander fans, this section will seem more familiar than the first. It’s very typical of his quiet, patient, and somewhat forlorn style. This latter section is entertaining — just as all Friedlander photos are — and a nice visual rejoinder to the first half. But it is less populated and closer to the known wheelhouse, and for me less novel. But I’ll take it, just as I’ll take the entire book (and the next one too, if and when it comes). It’s hard to pick a favorite from Friedlander’s countless monographs, but this one is highlight among recent titles. A love letter to the photographic act, it should resonate with all the other lovers.

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Blake Andrews is a photographer based in Eugene, OR. He writes about photography at blakeandrews.blogspot.com.
photo-eye Gallery photo-eye Conversation with David Trautrimas Delaney Hoffman and Anne Kelly Multimedia mastermind David Trautrimas is back with a new series of rendered photographs of domestic interiors that will knock your socks off! Listen to him describe his process and practice in this photo-eye Conversation with Gallery Director Anne Kelly.
David Trautrimas, We Had All the Time in the World, 2022, Archival pigment print, 20x30", Edition of 4, $1200

This week, we are so excited to premier brand new photographs from gallery artist, David Trautrimas!

David Trautrimas is an artist/photographer/all-around maker hailing from Toronto, Canada. Here at photo-eye, we know David for his series, Habitat Machines, wherein the artist dissembled and photographed household goods before using these components to digitally create an architectural space. The importance of space continues to be important in Trautrimas’ newest series, which turns the focus inward. Using Cinema 4D and the digital toolbox that comes with it, Trautrimas has spent the pandemic crafting uncanny, entrancing images of his own interior life that resonate across Western culture.

photo-eye's Gallery Director, Anne Kelly recently sat down with Trautrimas for a conversation! They talk modernist architecture, materiality and conceptual flexibility. View the video and learn more about David Trautrimas below!




>> David Trautrimas on his Practice of Deconstruction! <<


>> Habitat Machines at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art! <<



David Trautrimas, The Fear of Getting Old, 2021/2022, Archival pigment print, 20x13", Edition of 5, $900


David Trautrimas, Never Ready for All the Attention, 2022, Archival pigment print, 9x13", Edition of 5, $900


David Trautrimas, Night Sweats, 2022, Archival pigment print, 20x30", Edition of 4, $1200


• • • • • 
  
Print costs are current up to the time of posting and are subject to change.

photo-eye Gallery is proud to represent David Trautrimas.

For more information, and to purchase prints from David Trautrimas, please contact Gallery Director Anne Kelly or Gallery Assistant Delaney Hoffman, or you may also call us at 505-988-5152 x202

photo-eye Gallery photo-eye Conversation with David Trautrimas Delaney Hoffman This week, photo-eye Gallery Director Anne Kelly sits down with represented artist David Trautrimas to discuss his newest series *insert title* in a riveting new photo-eye Conversation. Tune in to hear Trautrimas speak about his interest in modernist architecture, kitchen appliances and more!

David Trautrimas, We Had All The Time In The World, 2022, Archival pigment print, 20x30", Edition of 4, $1200

This week, we are so excited to premier brand new photographs from gallery artist, David Trautrimas!

David Trautrimas is an artist/photographer/all-around maker hailing from Toronto, Canada. Here at photo-eye, we know David for his series, Habitat Machines, wherein the artist dissembled and photographed household goods before using these components to digitally create an architectural space. The importance of space continues to be important in Trautrimas’ newest series, which turns the focus inward. Using Cinema 4D and the digital toolbox that comes with it, Trautrimas has spent the pandemic crafting uncanny, entrancing images of his own interior life that resonate across Western culture.

photo-eye's Gallery Director, Anne Kelly recently sat down with Trautrimas for a conversation! They talk modernist architecture, materiality and conceptual flexibility. View the video and learn more about David Trautrimas below!





>> David Trautrimas on the Practice of Deconstruction! <<

>> Habitat Machines at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art <<



David Trautrimas, Never Ready For All The Attention, 2022, Archival pigment print, 20x30", Edition of 4, $1200



David Trautrimas, The Fear of Getting Old, 2022, Archival pigment print, 30x20", Edition of 4, $1200



David Trautrimas, Ghoster Coaster, 2022, Archival pigment print, 20x30", Edition of 4, $1200


• • • • • 
  

Print costs are current up to the time of posting and are subject to change.

photo-eye Gallery is proud to represent David Trautrimas.

For more information, and to purchase prints from David Trautrimas please contact Gallery Director Anne Kelly or Gallery Assistant Delaney Hoffman, or you may also call us at 505-988-5152 x202