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photo-eye Gallery Fractured: Mini Interviews Meg Griffiths and Virgil DiBiase In week 8 of our mini-interview series, we talk to Meg Griffiths and Virgil DiBiase. In their unique practice, these artists examine perception itself — our sensing and making sense of the world — and question our fractured experience of reality.


Exhibition view of Fractured

In week 8 of our mini-interview series, we talk to Meg Griffiths and Virgil DiBiase. In their unique practice, these artists examine perception itself — our sensing and making sense of the world — and question our fractured experience of reality.

Meg Griffiths conceptual still lives direct our gaze to those liminal spaces where light and matter fall apart to create something new. In each carefully constructed photograph, she captures the sublime in the ephemerality of life — her work invites us to embrace the uncertainty of a moment and let it transform us.

Virgil DiBiase’s series Dementia Portraits and Perception examines how our perception of time and space is fractured under extenuating circumstances, such as a debilitating illness like dementia. His exquisite platinum prints are “perfect metaphors” for a fragmented state of mind and questions of what constitutes memory, and if it can even be fixed in time or kept intact.

Enjoy!

MEG GRIFFITHS | SOMEWHERE WITHIN AND WITHOUT


Meg Griffiths, A Soft Unconscious Mourning, 2018, archival pigment print, 20 x 20 inches, edition of 10, framed, $1380

What is your process like?
The two pieces selected for the show from my ongoing series Somewhere within and without are all about process, both external and internal. Just as Baruch Spinoza, the 17th Century Dutch philosopher, states, "an individual is a process" so too is the making of these still lives in my small studio here in Denton, Texas. The images I construct work to subtly shift and deconstruct the ways in which we engage with space, time and perception. They are means of working through uncertainty into understanding. The inspiration for these images is particular to each one and based upon personal experiences, or ways of seeing and sensing the world. I also do a fair amount of research and writing, on subjects such as philosophy, physics, beauty, and the ephemeral meaning of what it means to be alive. I feel all of it is synthesized through me and comes to converge into a small square box 
the image really being a mark of that distillation.

Meg Griffiths, Sieve of the Universe, 2017, archival pigment print, 20 x 20 inches, edition of 10, framed, $1380

What inspired this image? 
"Sieve of the Universe" was one of the first images I made in the series. It is what really set me on the path to making the way that I have been for the past few years and will continue to make.  I think the title sums up, in a way, what the entire series alludes to.

Can you share an interesting story about your subject matter or the making of your images?
When people ask me about "Sieve of the Universe" they ask one of two things, the first being, "is this image upside down?" and the second, "what is that white powder?" I Iove questions and often find that the most interesting thoughts and responses can arise from such prompts. 

When asked, I do not so much answer the first question, for I feel the question is actually rhetorical in a way. But sometimes I like to just share a quote, such as this lovely one by Magritte, who said, "the deepest mysteries lie in the things that are conventionally familiar, including our own thinking." And then, possibly, respond with a few questions of my own. Why be so coy? Well, for one, it is more fun, and, further, I find a conversation starter much more interesting than a conversation ender. In a way, all conversations surrounding this question can be been traced back to how the question speaks to our desire for order, certainty, and knowing. There is a thirst to know the "real" way or the "right" way. There is an up, there is a down. Knowing this makes us comfortable. Not knowing creates discomfort. Why? Well, mainly because uncertainty is not something we like as humans. So I love questions like this, for the image is most definitely meant to make you question, to make you feel something, to make you look at who you are and reflect upon that as much as what I have tried to express. That is my hope anyway. 

The answer to the second question is definitively flour.  I like common household objects and conventional or domestic substances that ground you in the familiar, but I enjoy using them in ways that are unfamiliar. Allowing them to function differently, as metaphors, symbols, surrogates for something other than what their creators intended them for. A ball of red yarn is factually a ball of red yarn, but it also alludes to space and time and how those two things curve. In some of my images, things are more fixed, in others, however, they are not what they seem. I like this dialectic when moving through the meaning of one image to the next. There is a metaphor for life in there somewhere I know it, just need to spend a bit more time working through that.

Bio: 
Meg Griffiths was born in Bloomington, Indiana and raised in Houston, Texas. She received two B.A.’s at the University of Texas in Cultural Anthropology and English Literature and earned her Master of Fine Arts from Savannah College of Art and Design in Photography. She currently lives in Denton, Texas and is an Assistant Professor of Photography at Texas Woman's University. She was awarded 2nd place prize at PhotoNola in 2019 for her series Somewhere within and without. She was awarded the Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Best Fine Art Series in 2017, honored as One's to Watch in 2015 at Atlanta Celebrates Photography, and PDN 30 Photographers to Watch in 2012. Her books and works have been shown and collected nationally and internationally.


VIRGIL DIBIASE | DEMENTIA PORTRAITS


Virgil DiBiase, 1000 Pieces, 2019, platinum/palladium print, 8 x 10 inches, edition of 5, unframed, $500

What is your process like?
I shoot with a full format digital camera. I then make digital negatives for contact printing with the platinum palladium process. I coat a PtPd solution on to 100% rag paper, let it dry, place the digital negative onto the paper and expose it to ultraviolet light. Then develop and wash it.

What inspired these images? 
The photo with the puzzle, that’s my mother-in-law, who lived with my wife and I for five years, until she recently passed in September 2019. She was quick at putting together puzzles, so my wife dared her to try a 1000 piece puzzle. I had just bought a Lomo pancake lens and this was the first time I got to use it.  I shot 7 photos of her with the puzzle before she waved me off. We got along fine, but she was feisty. She was on her cellphone talking to her son for the first 5 images, the 7th was the one. She didn’t finish the puzzle because she couldn’t find the 4th corner piece… she would start with the corner pieces. When I showed her the photo she said: “what do you see in that?”

Virgil DiBiase, behind the scene of 1000 pieces, 2019
I’ve been working and continue to work on a project concerning dementia, portraits and perceptions. My mother-in-law did not have dementia though the photograph is a document and a metaphor. I didn’t realize it at the time I shot it, but instinctually I did.

Virgil DiBiase, Blind, 2019, platinum/palladium print, 8 x 10 inches, edition of 5, unframed, $500

The picture with the snow: In January 2019, my wife and I were walking in the woods during heavy snow. I had my small camera with a built-in-flash and thought it could be a good picture. I took four shots. Several weeks later, I looked through my files and was thinking about what my patient had said to me that day. She had Alzheimer’s disease and said “when you look at me and question me, I go blind.” I looked at the file with the snowflake blocking my wife’s face and there it was. A perfect metaphor.

Virgil DiBiase, behind the scene of Blind, 2019

Bio: 
Virgil DiBiase lives in rural Indiana with his wife and two donkeys. He is a full-time clinical neurologist, photographer, and part-time farmhand. He has exhibited his work in many juried group shows including Griffin Museum of Photography, Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Colorado Photographic Arts Center, Edition One Gallery, Soho Photo Gallery and Providence Center for Photographic Arts. He’s been published in B&W magazine, LFI Magazine, Burn Magazine, The Cresset, and recently PBS News hour, Brief but Spectacular. He’s had solo shows at the Rangefinder Gallery in Chicago, Strimbu Gallery at Valparaiso University and the Workspace Gallery in Lincoln Nebraska. He’s been short-listed three times for the Royal Photographic Society International Print Exhibition and has been a Critical Mass Finalist for the last 3 years. His work is in the permanent collection of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art.


Stay tuned for next's week post, where we'll talk to Charles Anselmo and William Lesch






All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com 

Book Review Zakir Hussain Maquette Photographs by Dayanita Singh Reviewed by Zach Stieneker The book is well known as Dayanita Singh’s primary medium, one she explores to create new relationships between photography, publishing, the exhibition and the museum. But where did her passion for the book as the ideal vessel for her photos, for the stories she tells, begin? The answer lies in Zakir Hussain, a handmade maquette Singh crafted in 1986 as her first project as a graphic design student.

Zakir Hussain Maquette. By Dayanita Singh.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DT575
Zakir Hussain Maquette  
Photographs by Dayanita Singh

Steidl, Gottingen, Germany, 2020. In English. 
88 pp., 94 illustrations, 8¼x9½".

“When you come to watch an Indian music concert, you come to watch a beautiful thing being created,” observes Zakir Hussain. “Sometimes you are a part of it, sometimes you are not. You enjoy the rapport, how well two people come together. How beautifully they can connect.”

In much the same way, viewing Dayanita Singh’s Zakir Hussain Maquette is to see a beautiful thing being created. As a facsimile of the artist’s original maquette, replete with penciled notes and residual glue stains, the book is presented not as a static, polished product but, rather, an artwork in the process of becoming. It is a gift that emerges from the connection between two people: Hussain, the tabla virtuoso, and Singh, a young graphic design student, poised to begin an influential and highly innovative career working in the medium of the photobook.

Zakir Hussain MaquetteBy Dayanita Singh.

In this edition of the maquette, the scanned prototype is packaged alongside a foldout poster and a reader with conversations and images of Singh’s notebooks. Collectively, these materials invite readers to engage with the book while circulating between two modes of attention: first, attention to the process of the book’s construction, and second, attention to the character study of Zakir Hussain.

Zakir Hussain MaquetteBy Dayanita Singh.
With regard to this first mode, Steidl remarks that “from the beginning [he] saw the maquette as a tool for people who are curious about how books come into being.” To that end, it begins and ends with annotated contact sheets. Faint outlines around the images give the impression of three-dimensionality — evince the original maquette’s handmade construction. Glue stains and smudges give the paper a worn quality, obscuring its newness. The images are surrounded by scrawled notes and contact sheet numbers, often scratched out and revised, rendering the history of Singh’s decision making legible. That the result we view is one out of many considered alternatives is true of any photobook, but here this idea is foregrounded. Singh’s notebooks explicitly elucidate her approaches to each aspect of the book’s design. These explanations are granular — we even learn about her choice of font size.

Singh’s photographs are dynamic, and the testimonials gathered from Hussain, along with a variety of people in his orbit, create a compelling portrait of an artist who, by his own admission, is inseparable from his art.

Zakir Hussain MaquetteBy Dayanita Singh.

Shanay Jhaveri’s included essay, “Finding Form,” explains how Singh’s instinctual approach in crafting the book’s layout emulates the improvisational character of tabla playing, meaning that Singh’s construction of the book can be seen as a search for spatial rhythm. Further, this resonance provides a link between the book’s design and its content: Zakir Hussain. Jhaveri writes that in the maquette “there is no story or plot –– simply the privilege of being with Hussain.”

At this stage of Singh’s career –– one marked by an expansive vision of what the photobook can be –– Zakir Hussain Maquette can be revisited as a singular glimpse into a mind that, as Singh expresses it, “think[s] in the book.” Contextualized as a precursor to her later “book objects”, the maquette becomes a study in origin. It’s also a guidebook, but it’s absent of didacticism, descriptive rather than prescriptive, and so, like an Indian music concert, sometimes you are part of it, and sometimes you are not. Either way, it’s an affirmation of creative potential, and it’s a beautiful thing.

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Zakir Hussain MaquetteBy Dayanita Singh.
Zakir Hussain MaquetteBy Dayanita Singh.

Zach Stieneker holds a BA in English and Spanish from Emory University. Following graduation, he spent several months continuing his study of photography in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

photo-eye Gallery Fractured: Mini Interviews Jennifer Steensma Hoag, David Paul Bayles, Peter Essick Welcome back! This week we talk to artists Jennifer Steensma Hoag, David Paul Bayles, and Peter Essick. In their distinct approach to photography, their work comments on our connection to the natural world and how our perceived separateness from the natural environment is socially constructed.

Exhibition view of Fractured

Welcome back! This week we talk to artists Jennifer Steensma Hoag, David Paul Bayles, and Peter Essick. In their distinct approach to photography, their work comments on our connection to the natural world and how our perceived separateness from the natural environment is socially constructed.

Jennifer Steensma Hoag’s exceptional photographs illustrate a perspective of nature that is oppositional—humans as manipulating and ruling nature, not as part of it. The white figure in the Hazmat suit is isolated from his environment, removed from that which constitutes humanity as a species, limited by the plasticity of human behavior and culture.

David Paul Bayles stunning black-and-white photographs of grafted walnut trees stand as metaphors for a landscape historically fractured by social inequality. His work documents how the natural landscape is able to tell a human story of difference and pain. Yet, the trees in David’s photographs give us hope by presenting a vision of growth and rebirth after the winter of a sad history.

Peter Essick’s “Construction Site, Tucker, Georgia” is a remarkable drone-captured image. The removed composition creates a rhythmic surface that reminds us of an Abstract Expressionist painting—the elevated one-point perspective reduces the waste material below to flat vibrant fields of color, and transforms the construction elements on site, into beautiful abstract lines. His work reminds us of the bigger picture, how we are inseparable from our environment and live in a symbiotic relationship with all of life.

Enjoy!



JENNIFER STEENSMA HOAG | BROKEN MODELS


Jennifer Steensma Hoag, Untitled, 2016, archival pigment print, 17 x 22 inches, edition of 10, framed, $1100

What is your process like?
The initial process of my work is conceptual and research based. After I feel the idea for the work has solidified, I’ll begin gathering equipment and working on logistics. I’m a planner by nature and I enjoy research, so I think I naturally gravitate to this way of working. Once I’m on site, I am very focused. Other than the technical aspects of shooting, I work extremely intuitively and like to explore my subject by trying different possibilities that come to mind. I think this probably came from my background shooting film; not knowing exactly how the photo would turn out made me want to give myself a lot of choices. Often the images I ultimately select will not be my first photographs and it is through the process of exploring the subject within the constraints of my idea that I find my best work. Even shooting digitally, as in this body of work, as I’m photographing, I’m not entirely sure which photograph I will ultimately select. After shooting, editing down the photographs and optimizing the files is an important part of the process because I think photography is a beautiful medium and the crafting of a gorgeous finished print is important to me.

What inspired these images?
I saw an exhibit titled "Late Harvest" at The Nevada Museum of Art while I was attending their Art + Environment Conference. The show featured historical wildlife paintings juxtaposed with contemporary artists who made their work with taxidermy. I was entirely captivated by the exhibit and cannot tell you how often I visited the show during the conference. It was the inspiration I was looking for as I moved from my last body of work, Compromised Beauty, to a new series of photographs. At that point I began researching taxidermy and found Rachel Poliquin’s book, The Breathless Zoo. A fascinating historical and poetic account of the process and meaning of taxidermy, Poliquin’s eloquent writing helped to solidified my concepts and increase my excitement about this idea. Utilizing a Hazmat suit was a continuation of my previous photographic series in which I photographed a figure in a bright yellow Hazmat suit in beautiful landscapes. Our connection to the natural world has been a consistent thread in my work for over twenty years. From large color photographs of ambiguous land use to digitally manipulated photographic fictions of deer in urban and suburban environments, my work has addressed the relationship of humans with the land and its inhabitants.

Jennifer Steensma Hoag, Untitled, 2016, archival pigment print, 17 x 22 inches, edition of 10, framed, $1100

Can you share an interesting story about your subject matter?
What is not apparent is that the model in the photographs is my husband. An art collector and gallerist, he is my artistic accomplice and trusted critic. We have a similar aesthetic and appreciation for art. I love it that he is excited about my work and offers suggestions while on site. While shooting, he claims I get really intense and tend to bark out orders. I think it’s ironic that he has always been willing to model for me, but as a landscape photographer I never took him up on it. Now that I’ve been working in a directorial way, he is modeling for me but is nearly anonymous in his suit.

Bio:
Hoag earned her MFA from Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York (1992), and is currently an assistant professor at Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan. Her solo exhibitions include Interpreting Mary at Campos Photography Center, Rochester and Terra Incognita at both the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and the Adams Hall Gallery at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois. Her work has also been exhibited at such places as Flatfile Photography Gallery, Chicago; Paint Creek Center for the Arts, Rochester, Michigan; Gallery Arcadia, Grand Rapids, Michigan; and the Center for Land Use Interpretation, Wendover, Utah.

What inspired these images?
My wife and I were in northern California awaiting the birth of our grandson. He was having kidney troubles in utero so there were issues and concerns for all of us. We were staying on a piece of property along the Sacramento river that my son-in-law is working on.  It will become an artist retreat space. It has two barns, one for art making and gallery space and the other has been converted to a residence. Lea and I were staying in what they call the orchard house. It was originally used to house migrant farm workers. It was built by combining four huge wooden crates 8’x 8’x 12’ that were obtained at auction right after WWII. The huge crates were used by the military to airdrop supplies during the war. Gabe is converting the orchard house into a somewhat traditional Japanese Tea House that the owners of the land will stay in when they visit.

The property is surrounded by orchards. I had been looking at these grafted walnut trees and thinking of the migrant farm workers and how for so long white people have disproportionately benefited from the labors of people with darker skin. It hurt to be in this place of beauty and tranquility which also bore the evidence of many years of pain and inequality.

Early in the morning on the day my grandson Arlo was born, I was in the orchard house reading a review of Peggy Wallace Kennedy’s memoir, Broken Road. Kennedy is the daughter of George Wallace.
Her life has been a long effort toward reckoning with her family’s racist past. When her sons were born she was determined to help them live with love and respect for all people.  On the 50th anniversary of the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, Kennedy walked across the bridge with Bernice King, the youngest daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They held hands as a symbol of strength, unity, and commitment toward a better future for all people.

An image of their black and white clasped hands was in my mind when I walked to the window and looked out into the orchard. Until then I had seen the grafted trees, dark at the trunk and light where the trees begin to branch out, solely as a metaphor for how light-skinned people had so often reaped the fruit of the labor of dark-skinned people.

Thirty years ago the Black Walnut rootstock was grafted with the white-barked English Walnut scion. The outer layer of bark still bears the historical record of that forced union, while the inner tissues of the trees took a mere eight weeks to fuse together, sending moisture from the roots to the leaves and photosynthesized sugars from the leaves to the roots. Seven years later, and every year since, the trees have borne fruit.

With the image of Kennedy’s and King’s black and white clasped hands, I walked into the orchard choosing to also see hope.

Can you share an interesting story about your subject matter?
Projects usually evolve slowly for me, so this was very different. The inspired moment hit. The light was perfect and I walked out and made 10 successful images. In the days following I researched grafting walnut trees and species types.

Bio:
Photographer David Paul Bayles focuses on landscapes where the needs of forests and human pursuits often collide, sometimes coexist and on occasion find harmony. Some of his projects utilize a documentary approach while others use a more contemporary art practice. His photographs have been published in numerous magazines including Orion, Nature, Audubon, Outside, The L.A. Times Sunday Magazine and others. Public collections include The Portland Art Museum, Santa Barbara Art Museum, The Harry Ransom Center, Wildling Museum and others. His book Urban Forest, Images of Trees in the Human Landscape was chosen by The Christian Science Monitor as one of their seven favorite books of 2003. The David Paul Bayles Photographic Archive was created in 2016 at The Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley to archive his entire life’s work. He currently lives and photographs in the Coast range of western Oregon.


PETER ESSICK | CONSTRUCTION SITES


Peter Essick, Construction Site, Tucker, Georgia, 2019, archival pigment print, 20 x 29 inches, framed, $1275

What is your process like?
I have been working on a project photographing construction sites in Atlanta. I have been using a drone to get a unique perspective. I try to fly the drone early or late in the day when there are no workers at the site. My focus is on the patterns in the landscape that result from the construction of a residential or commercial building.

What inspired this image?
My main inspiration has been Abstract Expressionist paintings, especially those of the Color Field style. I am also inspired by the great aerial photographer, William Garnett, and the photographer Robert Adams who photographed new suburban constructions in Denver in the 1970s.

Can you share an interesting story about your subject matter or the making of your image?
Construction sites are a subject matter that by definition are constantly changing. After a while, I have found there are certain stages that are similar to all construction sites but I continue to find different designs in the land and buildings. What fascinates me the most are compositions that look abstract when seen from a distance, but reveal realistic details up close.

Peter Essick flying a drone

Bio:
Named one of the 40 most influential nature photographers in the world by Outdoor Photography Magazine UK, Peter Essick has been influenced by many noted American landscape photographers from Carleton Watkins to Robert Adams. His goal is to make photographs that move beyond mere documentation to reveal in careful compositions the human impact of development as well as the enduring power of the land. Essick is the author of two books of his photographs, The Ansel Adams Wilderness and Our Beautiful, Fragile World. He has photographed stories for National Geographic on many environmental issues including climate change, high-tech trash, nuclear waste and freshwater. Essick's photographs are in public and private collections. He is represented by Lumière Gallery in Atlanta and Cavan Images in New York. Currently, Essick is working on a book of his photographs about Fernbank Forest, an urban old-growth forest in Atlanta, and will be published by Fall Line Press in the October 2019.



Stay tuned for next's week post, where we'll talk to Meg Griffiths and Virgil DiBiase

>> View more work from Fractured

>> Read more about Fractured

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com 

Book Review Notes on Fundamental Joy Photographs by Carmen Winant. Reviewed by Bretta C. Walker "Historically the act of photographing, much as the act of inhabiting a female body, has violent implications — but what emerges when softness is a pursuit of ferocious abandon? What emerges when there is a fundamental shift in gaze, power, and in the destruction of hierarchy? Is it possible to leave everything behind?"
Notes on Fundamental Joy. By Carmen Winant.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=PM020
Notes on Fundamental Joy
Photographs by Carmen Winant

Printed Matter, New York, USA, 2019. 
In English. 94 pp., color & black-and-white illustrations.

Women. Or rather, womyn — a circle of womyn. In various states of dress, they join hands, embrace, caress, holding one another — holding one another up — and all-the-while documenting the proof of this possibility-turned-reality. Through the 1970s and ‘80s, thousands of American womyn left their homes and lives behind to build a new world for themselves, a world apart — a radical abandon of patriarchal construct and constraint, the greatest of all being capitalism, with a pointed, keen focus on community and survival. This movement is referred to as the Lesbian or Feminist Separatist Movement, a subversive and devoted reclamation of femininity and sisterhood, of language and image, of body and nature, of history — herstory.

In Carmen Winant’s profound offering, Notes on Fundamental Joy, we encounter a collection of photographs made across various separatist communes between the years 1979 and 1981 during annual summer happenings known as “Ovulars.” The Ovulars (a reclamation and evolution of the term “seminar,” meaning to spread seed or semen) were womyn-led photographic workshops in which commune residents would spend weeks dedicated to learning how to take, process, and print photographs of themselves, their environment, and each other. What resulted is an expansive, seductive archive which realizes a utopian-like sense of freedom and security that most might find themselves too cynical to understand or even hope for in this world. While the images of these nameless womyn carry a striking and powerful weight on their own, it is the material aspects of this piece and the running commentary from Winant herself which transforms this otherwise base, historical document into a tender, observational, and open questioning of ownership, authorship, and the inherent violence of photography and gaze, and, further, the ingrained violence of the patriarchal society in which we all inhabit, consensually or not.

Notes on Fundamental Joy. By Carmen Winant.

Historically the act of photographing, much as the act of inhabiting a female body, has violent implications — but what emerges when softness is a pursuit of ferocious abandon? What emerges when there is a fundamental shift in gaze, power, and in the destruction of hierarchy? Is it possible to leave everything behind?

Notes on Fundamental Joy. By Carmen Winant.
Turning the nearly transparent pages of this book, we find imposed upon us a sort-of performative act — an element of this work which manages to achieve Relational status while simultaneously remaining intimate and specific to Winant’s process and perspective. She writes, “To what extent is art-making an investigation of that which we do recognize already as our own, an attempt, a cast line? In what ways might this claim be harmful to others, to those who participated, to those who inherited from this carving out of Lesbian self? I am a traveler here. Am I a traveler here?” This caution in her authorship, this conflict in her connection to these images that she is so far removed from in her own identity along with her wavering authority in the role of curator, is echoed in the transparency and delicacy of the paper on which her words seem to whisper and these images lay.

The book is bifurcated by a short essay written by artist and veteran separatist Ariel Goldberg, an aside which only amplifies and expands upon questions posed by Winant and the resounding images that comprise the work. Goldberg asks “Where are the people in these pictures now? How do they feel about these images being circulated in an artists’ book or exhibit or Instagram post? Who will gain notoriety and benefit from these images re-entering the world in a new context, outside of the subcultures that created them?...”

Notes on Fundamental Joy. By Carmen Winant.
The essay is an abrupt intermission and perspective shift that at first might seem untimely. Upon digestion, however, they can be noted as a gesture of the very camaraderie which was exalted in these communes and documented during the Ovular’s while also functioning as an extension of Winant’s hyper-self- awareness. Goldberg’s writing also begs to challenge the intersectionality (or lack-there-of) within these lesbian / womyn-only havens and their hetero and trans-exclusivity, offering an added layer of complexity to the intake of the moony, sentimental images.

Goldberg goes on to ask “What emerges from the speculative gesture of refining one’s ability to use a camera?” And, while the contents and concepts of this book combined are greater than the sum of their parts, it is this very question and the repeated imagery of WOMYN + CAMERA which resonates.

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Notes on Fundamental Joy. By Carmen Winant.
Notes on Fundamental Joy. By Carmen Winant.

Bretta C. Walker is a creative practitioner utilizing still & motion photography as a means of documenting her performance in the role of Female Human in an intuition-driven & ritual-fueled practice. By harnessing the necromantic qualities of the photographic process to hold communion with self & surrounding – in concept & in form, her work addresses issues of liminality, femininity, & trauma.

photo-eye Gallery Fractured: Mini Interviews Marie Maher, Heidi Cost, Ruth Lauer Manenti Welcome to week 6 of our mini-interview series! This time we talk to Marie Maher, Heidi Cost, and Ruth Lauer Manenti. In a world that is constantly becoming through rapid transformation, their photographs reflect this process by portraying moments of heightened subjectivity. They bring up the question, can we be objective observers and storytellers in a fractured world?

 

Opening night for Fractured

Welcome to week 6 of our mini-interview series! This time we talk to Marie Maher, Heidi Cost, and Ruth Lauer Manenti. In a world that is constantly becoming through rapid transformation, their photographs reflect this process by portraying moments of heightened subjectivity. They bring up the question, can we be objective observers and storytellers in a fractured world?

In Marie Maher’s alluring composite Highway 41, a female figure emerges abstractly from a silhouetted rural street. The character is frozen in a confused movement leaving the subject matter open to many interpretations. Marie’s photograph can be seen as a voyeuristic mystery, a strange and captivating rhythm on a solitary night.

Heidi Cost combines digital photography with alternative darkroom processes. In Escape Through the Window, she uses self-portraiture and double exposures as a way to portray and manage her feelings while looking after her ailing mother. Paradoxically, the window in this multi-faceted cyanotype offers no magical escape, but is directly confrontational. 

Ruth Lauer Manenti’s delicate print powerfully conveys a story in one single image.  The cut braids offer a beginning, a middle, and an end in the story of a close friend. The work pushes the boundaries of storytelling and examines the relationship between the photographer and her subject matter.

Enjoy the interviews!

 

 MARIE MAHER | NIGHT MOVES


Marie Maher, Highway 41, 2017, archival pigment print with mixed media on board, edition of 10, 12 x 18 inches image, unframed, $400

What inspired this image?
I am a nocturnal person by nature and enjoy photo shoots at night. Everything seems more dramatic in the dark. During one of my nighttime outings, I decided to take some shots of desolate streets from inside my car. These images became the basis for my latest series, which I call “Night Moves.” It is a collection of stories around various encounters that occur at night. I wanted the scenes to be mysterious, perhaps a bit creepy, and open to interpretation as to what exactly is happening. The subjects are shadowy, indistinct characters, and there is a sense of motion that captures an instant in time, which adds to the drama. There may be a certain voyeuristic element to these images as well, but that is up to the viewer’s imagination.

The Highway 41 piece shows a blurry image of a female figure on the side of a deserted rural street. The subject is turned away from the vehicle and illuminated in the headlights. What exactly is happening is not clear. Is this about a fractured relationship? Is the woman in danger? If so, will the driver stop for assistance, or is the driver the danger? I like this piece a lot because of the suspense it creates.

Can you share an interesting story about your subject matter or the making of your image?
The image was created in two parts. I first photographed the road, which is less than a mile from my house. I later photographed the model and then composited her into the background. I generally use compositing on my surrealistic work, but I find that it can also be a powerful tool for achieving the effect I want on more “realistic” images as well, like this one.

My own interpretation of the story behind the image shifted as I created it. We may conclude something about a person only seen as a blur in low light, but how accurate can that be? I was reminded that initial impressions and assumptions about others may not be accurate when we aren’t directly involved.

Bio:
I can’t remember a time when I didn’t love art. I started painting in oils at the age of 12 and studied art and photography at SUNY, Buffalo and the University of New Mexico during my college years. Though I ended up with degrees in Architecture and Pharmacy to make a living, I never lost my passion for artistic expression, and decided to completely immerse myself in photography after a serious illness rearranged my priorities in 2007. 

Since 2009, I have entered over 60 juried contests and received over 30 awards from judges, peers, and the public alike. My work has been included in solo and group exhibitions, notably the Jadite Gallery in New York City. I have received numerous awards, including finalist in both the fine art & the alternative processes categories in the Julia Margaret Cameron Award. Five images from The Misled series have been exhibited at the 4th Biennial of Fine Art and Documentary Photography in Berlin, Germany.


 

HEIDI COST | ESCAPE THROUGH THE WINDOW

 

Heidi Cost, Escape Through the Window, 2019, toned cyanotype, 6 x 6 inches, edition of 5, framed, $560

What is your process like?
My artistic background is in analog photography. When digital photography became popular, I felt as though I had lost the connection with the physicality of creating images. This loss of direction resulted in an interest in alternative processes that combine digital negatives and actual darkroom printing. Cyanotypes do not require toxic chemicals and are easily manipulated by bleaching and toning the print to achieve tonalities other than the classic Prussian Blue of a traditional cyanotype. This image reminds me of a mummy with layers of covering in a kind of bandage. It made sense to print it as a cyanotype with its clinical blue tonalities and harsh lighting.

What inspired this image?
I was homebound for a period of time, taking care of my elderly mother who was suffering from dementia. Trying to carve out the few moments I could in each day, I made a series of self-portraits expressing the emotions I was experiencing while being a dutiful daughter.

Much is left to chance when working with double exposures and this image, a combination of Venetian blinds and self-portrait, evokes a sense of the mechanical self, going through the motions and repressing the layers of grief. I really had no idea how the two exposures would work with each other, so the majority of the creative process was about surrendering any control of the final image.

Bio/Artist Statement:
I find distinct beauty in organic shapes and forms and am intrigued with the way my simple surroundings fall into place without any effort or forced arrangement. This noticing is part of the process: a pile of leaves blown into a corner of the back porch, a dead bird among winter vegetables, window blinds casting shadows on the bedroom wall.

The imagery can be as simple as a discarded knitting project or a shadow falling across an adobe wall in the late afternoon –all invite individual interpretation and hold a story. I invite you to look at my photographs and dwell in the quiet potential of the images.
I work with traditional alternative processes such as Cyanotype, Kallitype, Van Dyke, and Platinum Palladium. The complex alchemy of these photographic processes leave much to chance, rendering each image unique.

I often present my final images in a hand-created book or portfolio form, in order to add to the handmade quality of the photographs.

Exhibitions:
Photo-eye Gallery Juried Show | Fractured | Santa Fe, NM | 2020
Nude Nite – An Annual Art Happening and Juried Show | Tampa, FL | 2020
New Mexico Women in the Arts Juried Show | Center for Contemporary Arts | Santa Fe, NM | 2012


RUTH LAUER MANENTI | TWO BRAIDS

 

Ruth Lauer Manenti, Two Braids, 2018, archival pigment print, 6 x 8 image, edition of 10, framed, $1000

What inspired this image?
The inspiration for this picture came from my love for Céline (Initially she was my student but we then became friends). She decided to cut and give her hair to Locks of Love and I asked her if I could photograph her hair first. Being that I’m looked upon as the “artist” in our community, she accepted my request and did not find it strange. Months later, after Una was born, I gave her this and one other photo of her hair. They were in a box and I don’t think, as of yet she has opened that box. I don’t think she feels ready for this reminder.

Céline's mother died of cancer in the spring of 2018, three months after Céline found out she was pregnant with her first child. It had been a long road leading up to that as Céline was anorexic and had to heal from that before she could have any children. Her body was too fragile to carry excess weight. We all kept an eye on her at that time, looking for any signs of a relapse, especially in her face, but it seemed that her marriage to David, the move to house with a backyard and potential for gardening, and the prospects of family, improved her condition, little by little, over the course of several years. So, there she was, happy, healthy and pregnant, while receiving the news of a terminal diagnose from her mother’s doctor.

Her mother Audrey was only 52 and not at all ready or prepared to die. In fact, up until the very end she was angry and unaccepting. The ambiguity and impermanence of life, she had not reflected upon. Whatever she wanted, more or less, she had had and now she wanted to live longer and to be a grandmother. Céline tried to help her mother find peace or acceptance, but her efforts were not enough to matter. The more effort Céline made, the more the circles under her eyes darkened. That’s when she started to feel ambivalent about the baby she was carrying, or not so much about the child, but about the happiness she felt, none the less, of this new chapter of her life. . .husband, baby, house etc.

Bio:
I live in a cabin in the woods in the Catskill Mountains of New York. My background is in painting and drawing, but fifteen years ago I inherited a K.B. Canham large format camera from someone I greatly admire. I taught myself how to use the camera and gradually accomplished what I was striving for in drawing and painting, through photography. I gather much of my inspiration from looking at drawings and paintings continuously over decades. My mother was also an artist. She had a wealth of talent and worked steadily throughout her life, yet her number one role was to take care of her family. Sadly, she left behind a legacy of unwanted, unpublished, unknown work. I realize, now that she has passed away, that part of my determination as an artist is to honor my mother and to create a continuum. Since breaking my neck in a car crash at the age of twenty, I have developed a strong spiritual life and practice for which I have made annual trips to India for the last thirty-five years to study yoga, meditation and Sanskrit and to adapt a way of life simpler and more ritualistic than I had known before.

I received a BFA from SVA in NYC and an MFA in drawing, printmaking and painting from the Yale School of Art in 1994, where I later taught. I also taught at Dartmouth College. I have exhibited at the Bill Maynes Art Gallery, the Lower East Side Printshop, John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Paula Cooper Gallery, The Griffin Museum of Photography, John Davis Gallery, and Le Salon Vert in Switzerland. I received a 2016 New York Foundation for the Arts grant in photography. I was an International Portfolio Winner in the Soho Photo Gallery competition in 2019.


Stay tuned for next's week post, where we'll talk to Peter Essick, Jennifer Steensma Hoag, David Paul Bayles.

>> View more work from Fractured

>> Read more about Fractured

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com 

Book Review Abendlied Photographs by Birthe Piontek. Reviewed by George Slade "Take time to read these images carefully. Piontek exquisitely weaves visual clues into the sequence of her book. Her narrative curlicues from description to evocation to staged mystery, with an occasional red herring thrown in to undermine complacency."
Abendlied. By Birthe Piontek.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=ZH975
Abendlied
Photographs by Birthe Piontek

Gnomic Book, New York, USA, 2019. In English. 112 pp., 70 images, 7x9¾".

Because the minds of people suffering from dementia are inaccessible to anyone, and, because dementia limits one’s capacity for describing their thoughts, those of us on the outside must project ourselves into what we imagine of their brain to conceptualize their sensory arena. We can’t ascertain meaning because they can’t articulate it, except in what seem to be random expressions. Yet, the randomness itself has meaning, and we might be well served to bring our familiarity with the loved one’s history and character to bear on the “meanings” of initially obscure gestures and utterances.

This is all very confusing, I know. It also seems like a respectful way to approach Birthe Piontek’s consideration of dementia in her family. In general, dementia affects more than one person—an entire familial structure shifts under the weight. (As a disclaimer, I should note that my father is in an advancing stage of Alzheimer’s-related dementia.) Relationships morph. The familiar becomes weird; the incongruous and uncanny are normalized. Roles change; adults become childlike, and youths assume a gravity beyond their years. Dislocation rattles the ecosystem.

Abendlied. By Birthe Piontek.
What are Piontek’s photographs evidence of? They’re not scientific or documentary; they are more like choreographic notes. It’s not immediately clear who, if anyone, is experiencing dementia. All the cast members appear in anomalous moments. Is dementia even the point of the book? Perhaps we readers are experiencing dementia-like disorientation. It’s tempting to keep the facts secret. In order to encourage the reading of Nich Hance McElroy’s poignant text, printed on memo-sized paper, addressed in first person to Piontek, and bound as if tucked or blown into the volume, I’ll withhold the answer here. No great shakes, one could just Google it. Not knowing something these days is rare and unnecessary. In the case of Abendlied, though, the truth is not the point.

McElroy’s missive is a perfect grace note to this book. Here’s a sample: “When memory unmoors the arrangement of the family, you look to artifacts to act as ligaments, to lash the raft together. No longer bound by the sense of continuity their identities give them, they’re held in tenuous proximity by the familiar objects that alternately bind and cloak them; held together only by holding together, and only where they can—however briefly—touch.”

Abendlied. By Birthe Piontek.

He writes directly to “B” and signs his name in cursive. The connection is intimate and nuanced. The web of B’s family members, their “tenuous proximity,” is nowhere near as legible. Even assuming actual related-ness is a leap. Gestures, attitudes, and vague physical likenesses loosely link the dramatis personae. They are all largely devoid of emotional expression—and that absence is a common feature of those suffering dementia. As redemption, notions of shelter and interpersonal compassion are plentiful.

Abendlied. By Birthe Piontek.
Take time to read these images carefully. Piontek exquisitely weaves visual clues into the sequence of her book. Her narrative curlicues from description to evocation to staged mystery, with an occasional red herring thrown in to undermine complacency. Clothing flows like liquid; armless sleeves tie limbs to staircase railings and limply arc from one person to another. Garments misbehave, presenting themselves backward or engulfing their wearer. Sheer stockings drape over drying racks, fix a seashell to a thigh, and ingest teacups like a snake swallows a frog.

Using photography to address dementia is a bit like ballroom dancing with an invisible partner. You know that someone is there, and you can sense the direction their physical parts are going, yet so many clues are missing. So much information is being withheld by the disease. What you see bears only tangential resemblance to what you know.

Those unfamiliar with dementia may be unaware of the phenomenon called sundowning, which is agitation related to the approach of nightfall. Then, by extension, the title of the book, German which translates to “evening song,” may have less resonance. The title also derives from a motet by composer Josef Rheinberger, who was 15 when he wrote the piece in 1855. The lyrics are roughly translated as “stay with us, because evening approaches and the day has come to an end”—as poignant an entreaty to a loved one embarked on a dementia journey as I can imagine, one I whisper every day to my father.

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Abendlied (Gnomic, 2019) joins a chronology of dementia-centric photobooks that includes Mark Jury and Dan Jury’s Gramp (Grossman/Penguin, 1976), Partial View: An Alzheimer’s Journal (Southern Methodist University Press, 1998; photographs by Nancy Andrews and text by Cary Smith Henderson), Peter Granser’s Alzheimer (Kehrer, 2008), Judith Fox’s I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer's (powerHouse, 2009), and Stephen DiRado’s With Dad (Davis Publications, 2019) which conveys moments during his father’s twelve years of dementia decline.

Abendlied. By Birthe Piontek.
Abendlied. By Birthe Piontek.

George Slade, aka re:photographica, is a writer and photography historian based in Minnesota's Twin Cities. He is also the founder and director of the non-profit organization TC Photo. rephotographica.com/

Image c/o Randall Slavin

photo-eye Gallery Fractured: Mini Interviews Jennifer McClure, K.K. DePaul, Jo Ann Chaus Hello! Welcome back to week 5 of our mini-interview series. This week we talk to Jennifer McClure, K.K. DePaul, and Jo Ann Chaus. In their unique approach to self-portraiture, these three amazing artists explore the relationship between a sense of self and womanhood—the fractured roles women play in society as wives, mothers, and independent individuals. They draw from personal history and cultural constructs to provide insights into the nature of psychology and human relationships.


Opening night for Fractured

Hello! Welcome back to week 5 of our mini-interview series. This week we talk to Jennifer McClure, K.K. DePaul, and Jo Ann Chaus. In their unique approach to self-portraiture, these three amazing artists explore the relationship between a sense of self and womanhood—the fractured roles women play in society as wives, mothers, and independent individuals. They draw from personal history and cultural constructs to provide insights into the nature of psychology and human relationships.

Jennifer McClure’s abstract and emotional self-portrait, documents the physical changes a woman’s body undergoes through pregnancy and the psychological impact of that transformation—how a body fractures giving birth to its greatest expression. She reminds us that life is a constant process of growth and change, that there is no such thing as destruction.

K.K. DePaul’s unique collage uses photography and a variety of objects to create a visual vocabulary. One recalls Dada assemblages in the way she embraces chance, accident, improvisation, and distortion. In her layering process, DePaul explores how one’s identity is represented, torn apart, and ultimately reconstructed by personal memory.

Jo Ann Chaus's work explores her identity and her relationship to herself. In each self-portrait, she assumes an alternate version of herself dictated by her costume and setting. Away from the public eye, the vulnerable self fractures in an unsettled state, leaving behind an intensity of expression and a myriad of interpretations.

Enjoy the interviews!

 

 

Jennifer McClure | Still in the Body

Jennifer McClure, Bend to a Quiet, 2018, archival pigment print, 12 x 18 inches, framed, $920

Can you tell us about your artistic process?
I shoot a lot of self-portraits, so I have a loose routine down. I write for quite a while. I come up with a basic concept and try to shoot that first. Then I keep shooting, and that's usually where the magic happens. I use a digital camera with an intervalometer. I end up with dozens of throwaways, but I give myself the time to forget to be self-conscious. I set the focus manually. I know I can lock the focus digitally, or track it, but I get so caught up in the idea of what I'm shooting that I forget to adjust when I change scenes. Keeping it on manual forces me to be aware in the moment.

What inspired this image?
I became unexpectedly pregnant shortly after I got married, just before turning 46. My pregnancy was somewhat of a miracle and, at the same time, one of the most common experiences on the planet. We have all been in someone else's uterus. My huge belly became the topic of almost every conversation I had, as if nothing that happened in the previous 45 years mattered. I was seven months pregnant when I went to teach at the Maine Media Workshops for the first time. Teaching there had been a dream of mine and I wanted to get it all right. I was nervous and forgetful and emotional. I cried in class. Everyone asked about the baby. I worried that my pregnancy was overshadowing and interfering with something I wanted for myself, and I worried that the rest of my life might be like that. I made this photo after class one day.

Can you share an interesting story about your subject matter or the making of your image?

I meant to show myself with the top half of me completely obscured. I didn't know what the shadows would do. They were a pleasant surprise. I was staying in downtown Rockport, and the window faced other houses and a small stretch of road. I thought I was showing myself disappearing, but I was actually exposing quite a lot. And the surprise shadows completely capture the in-between state of being that is pregnancy.

Bio:
Jennifer McClure is a fine art photographer based in New York City. She uses the camera to ask and answer questions. She is interested in appearances and absences, short stories and movies without happy endings. Her work is about solitude and a poignant, ambivalent yearning for connection. Jennifer was awarded CENTER's Editor's Choice by Susan White of Vanity Fair in 2013 and has been exhibited in numerous shows across the country. The Leica Gallery in Boston will present a solo show of her work in November 2020. She was a 2019 and 2017 Critical Mass Top 50 finalist and twice received the Arthur Griffin Legacy Award from the Griffin Museum of Photography. Lectures include the School of Visual Arts i3: Images, Ideas, Inspiration series, Fotofusion, FIT, NY Photo Salon and Columbia Teacher's College. She has taught workshops at PDN's PhotoPlus Expo, the Maine Media Workshops, and Fotofusion. She was a thesis reviewer and advisor for the Masters Programs at both the School of Visual Arts and New Hampshire Institute of Art. Her work has been featured in publications such as GUP, The New Republic, Lenscratch, Feature Shoot, L'Oeil de la Photographie, The Photo Review, Dwell, Adbusters, and PDN. She also founded the Women's Photo Alliance in 2015.


K.K. DePaul | Chameleon

K.K. DePaul, Shattered, 2019, mixed media, 17 x 12 inches, unique, $2125

Can you tell us about your artistic process?
In general, my work is about memory and the way one’s self-identity shifts over a lifetime. The piece in Fractured is from the series ‘Chameleon’ which addresses the way women of my generation often distorted themselves to meet a partner's expectations. I begin with ‘word pictures' . . . short writings that speak in my voice from an earlier time. I usually develop the narrative first. I write my (rough) project statement before I begin with image-making. This seems to keep me ‘on track’ (although I will make adjustments along the way).

What inspired this image?
I found a photograph of a young woman that looked very much like me when I was young. I casually draped it over some books on my bedside table. The way the light from the window hit the glossy paper caused a distortion that was very interesting. I started taking quick photos with my phone, and moving the paper around to distort it further. The images reminded me of looking into a fun-house mirror. I decided that this would be the perfect vehicle to tell the story of how I became unrecognizable during my failed marriages. The examples above are all in-camera distortions of the same original photograph. 

Bio:
K.K. DePaul is an explorer of secrets, combining and recombining bits and pieces of memory to make sense of her family stories. Artist, Photographer, Educator, and Gallery Director, K.K DePaul brings a multi-faceted background to her extensive career in the arts. Kim’s award-winning work as a textile artist and photographer has received national and international attention, and has been included in the corporate collections of: Smith-Kline, The Mayo Clinic, and Capital Blue Cross, and the private collections of photographers: Char-lotte Niel, Christopher James, Sophie Zenon, and Sarah Moon. Her work has been published in Black&White Magazine, EyeMazing, Diffusion, and Pho-toWorld (China). Most recently, she has been the recipient of the 10th Julia Margaret Cam-eron Award, with two exhibitions in Barcelona, and she was part of the exhibition, Tribe, at the Fox Talbot Museum in the UK.



Jo Ann Chaus | Conversations with Myself


Can you tell us about your artistic process?
I’m sure it would be interesting to see a video of my process. I work untethered, so after shooting a few frames, I dash back to the camera, check the image, and go back and forth again and again.  Once I’ve established my spot and made camera adjustments, I transport myself to a suspended state where I embody the character I’ve assumed in this particular costume, and perform as she might be, assorting my gaze, stance and gesture until I feel I am her. It’s an interesting process.

Jo Ann Chaus, Shutters, 2019, archival pigment print, 19 x 13 inches, edition of 8, framed, $1100

What inspired "Shutters"?
After a show in Barcelona last spring, I was traveling to Amsterdam for a few days to see the Erwin Olaf exhibit at two sister museums in The Hague.  I chose my hotel based on its opulent decor, as a potential opportunity to make work.  I always travel with my tripod, potential wardrobe and props.  Of course, the light is beautiful in Amsterdam, and the room had these thick, gorgeous shutters.  I made a few sketch shots the previous day and that morning.  When I returned after a walk a strong sun was streaming through the window, casting strong shadows onto this crazy wallpaper.  The room was a study in blue; I selected my lace collar blue vintage dress, rearranged the furniture, adjusted the shutters and my placement against the wall in the light/shadows.  Readjusting as the light changed, when the shadows were just right I quickly made a series of shots with assorted gestures and postures, giving birth to Shutters.

Jo Ann Chaus, Queen, 2019, archival pigment print, 19 x 13 inches, edition of 8, framed, $1100

What inspired "Queen"?
I had been to this location in Maine before and remembered this interior alcove window. Sorting through my wardrobe trunk, I coordinated the coat, mirror and space, camera, tripod and focus and landed on this shot.

Bio:
Jo Ann Chaus (b. 1954) is an American photographer from and based in the New York metro area. She is a color photographer and printer, influenced by the early color giants William Eggleston, Stephen Shore, and Saul Leiter, and by Elinor Carucci’s and Jen Davis’s intimate family and self-portraiture; she holds two certificates from the International Center of Photography in New York City. In 2016 Jo Ann self-published “Sweetie & Hansom”, a 60 image book with text, about her family of origin, and continues to make images for “Conversations with Myself”, her work of self-portraiture where she uses saved and inherited props ad garment to bridge the past with the present in her 75+ image body of work that explores identity, domesticity, family, juxtaposed with cultural references. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, and she holds special recognitions and awards:, Critical Mass 2019 Top 200, PDN Emerging Photographer Fall 2019 Winner, Winner 13th Pollux Awards non-professional category, Klompching Fresh 2019 Finalist, Candela Unbound8! juried exhibition, 14th Julia Margaret Cameron Awards Honorable Mention, Juror’s Choice South East Center for Photography Portrait Exhibition 2019, Permanent collection in the Center for Creative Photography Qualities of Light Exhibition.


Stay tuned for next's week post, where we'll talk to Heidi Cost, Marie Maher and Ruth Lauer Manenti

>> View more work from Fractured

>> Read more about Fractured

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com