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Kindred Spirits Closing Week


photo-eye Gallery Kindred Spirits Closing Week by Alexandra Jo The works in Kindred Spirits are diverse, yet equally engaging. At the heart of each piece in the show is that common theme of Kindred Spirits, how all of earth’s creatures are connected, though unique. This is what makes Kindred Spirits an exhibition not to be missed.


Keith Carter, White Owl, Toned gelatin-silver print, 2004,
15 x 15 inches, Edition of 35, $2,200
It’s interesting to observe how the things that we look at every day can make small shifts visually and
conceptually over time. This is one of my favorite things about living and working around art that I love. Artwork that truly resonates with a person can change and grow with that individual’s perspectives and moods like a living thing. Spending the past few weeks with the Kindred Spirits exhibition at photo-eye Gallery has definitely given me this experience. The works in this show are so diverse, yet equally engaging, that I’ve found myself constantly drawing new connections between different pieces, finding new visual paths throughout the space every day. As the exhibition draws to a close, these relationships continue to unfold.

Pentti Sammallahti, Druridge Bay, England, 1998, Toned gelatin-silver print, 7 x 6.3 inches, $1,300

The curatorial decision to hang Keith Carter and Pentti Sammallahti’s work interspersed in groups along the gallery’s larger walls is a primary example of how the visual relationships in this show are abundant and fluid. Both artists work in traditional black-and-white photography and their photographs flow seamlessly together. However, where Keith Carter’s photographs are larger, darker, other-worldly, Pentti Sammallahti’s work is subtle, intimately scaled, and feels akin to documentary photographs of everyday life’s most poetic moments. Moving between the two bodies of work while circumnavigating the gallery provides simultaneous visual contrast and harmony.  Across the gallery space, Maggie Taylor’s fantastical photomontages, along with the group of David Deming’s playful dog sculptures, bring color and fantasy into the exhibition. Contrasting the substantial physical presence and mass of Deming’s large, animated dogs Taylor’s work is delicate and intricate. These artists offer two very different approaches to whimsey and imagination.

Maggie Taylor, Ship of Fools, 2018, Archival Pigment Print,
15 x 15 inches, Edition of 15, $2,800


The individual work of the four artists in this exhibition complements each of the other bodies of work in specific and legible ways. Looking from Sammallahti to Taylor is a journey from the real to the imaginary, from black-and-white to color. Shifting focus from Carter to Deming is to find two very different avenues into contemplating the surreal and the joyful. At the heart of each piece in the show is that common theme of Kindred Spirits, how all of earth’s creatures are connected, though unique. This is what makes Kindred Spirits an exhibition not to be missed.



David L. Deming, Josephine is a Hard Act to Follow, 1994,
Painted steel sculpture, 72 x 42 inches, Unique, $15,000


Kindred Spirits runs through August 24, 2019.




All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com


On view through August 24, 2019

Featuring work by Keith Carter, David Deming, Pentti Sammallahti, and Maggie Taylor

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published. 
Prices will increase as editions sell. 





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