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photo-eye Gallery John Chervinsky Emerging Photographer Scholarship 2017 The Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA is offering a scholarship to aid emerging photographers in honor of Photographer's Showcase artist and our friend, John Chervinsky, who passed away in 2015.The John Chervinsky Emerging Photographer Scholarship seeks to recognize, encourage and reward photographers with the potential to create a body of work and sustain solo exhibitions.

John Chervinsky
The Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA is offering a scholarship to aid emerging photographers in honor of Photographer's Showcase artist and our friend, John Chervinsky, who passed away in 2015. An engineer and scientist, as well as a photographer, John's work was experimental in nature primarily dealing with reality, perception, and representation. John was warm, humble, and engaging and is missed by all who knew him.

About the Scholarship


The John Chervinsky Emerging Photographer Scholarship seeks to recognize, encourage and reward photographers with the potential to create a body of work and sustain solo exhibitions. Awarded annually, the Scholarship provides recipients with a monetary award of $3,000, an exhibition of their work at the Griffin Museum of Photography, and a volume from John’s personal library of photography books. The Scholarship seeks to provide a watershed moment in the professional lives of emerging photographers, providing them with the support and encouragement necessary to develop, articulate and grow their own vision for photography.

Eligibility Criteria

The scholarship is open to photographers who have produced individual works of photography and/or are in the process of producing bodies of work.

We are looking for candidates who are serious about photography, whose potential is emerging and whose photography will benefit from this scholarship. Candidates should not be currently enrolled in a photography degree program. There is no age limit. There are no residency requirements.

Photographers without gallery representation who have not exhibited solo in a gallery/museum setting are eligible (coffee shop, community gallery, library etc. are eligible exhibition settings).

This scholarship is not for well-established photographers. Well-established photographers are individuals in mid-photography-careers and are seen by the public and peers as distinguished in the field of photography and have many accomplishments as a photographer. Please note again that an artist who has had SOLO exhibitions in established galleries/museums or has gallery representation will be considered too accomplished to receive this scholarship.

Submissions

The Hand of Man, John Chervinsky
Submissions may be made directly to the Griffin Museum gateway only. You will be asked for a brief biography and artistic cv (a single pdf that includes both bio and cv); a statement of artistic purpose/intent; a statement on the work supplied, and flattened rgb jpgs (1200 pixels on the longest side) of your photographs (minimum of 10/maximum of 14 photographs). Our gateway will assemble your input into one area on our web host site and give the jurors the ability to go there to view and also download a pdf as needed. You will be able to insert your text for statements  into the gateway application. No other means of submission will be accepted. All missing criteria will disqualify the submission. Emails will not be accepted as a method of submissions. It is recommended that great thought and effort be put into the artistic purpose/intent statement (see sample supplied).



APPLY HERE

Scholarship Dates and Deadlines:
August 1, 2017: Application period opens
September 5, 2017: Application period closes
Mid December, 2017: Announcement of 2017 scholarship recipient
March 2017: Award Ceremony

» Read More about the Griffin Museum
» Read Aline Smithson's Remembrance of John on Lenscratch


Book Review Lindbergh Winogrand Women By Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Reviewed by Blake Andrews Lindbergh's project intersperses photographs from Winogrand's 1975 book Women Are Beautiful with a heavier dose of his own On Street, a series based on a young fashion model walking the gritty sidewalks of contemporary New York.
Lindbergh Winogrand Women 
Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Koenig Books, 2017. 
 
Lindbergh Winogrand Women
Reviewed by Blake Andrews.

Lindbergh Winogrand Women
Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Text by Joel Meyerowitz and Ralph Goetz.
Koenig Books, Köln, Germany, 2017. In English and German. 140 pp., four-color and black-and-white illustrations, 8¾x9x¾".


At first blush street photography and fashion photography don't have much in common. Street photographers work without preconception, using chance and improvisation. The resulting image is meant to be a self-contained entity without an ulterior motive. Fashion shooters typically work under more controlled conditions — often in an artificially lit studio — with output geared toward a specific style or product placement.

Apples and oranges, right?

Lindbergh Winogrand Women Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Koenig Books, 2017.

But perhaps they share more in common than meets the eye. As a thought experiment, what if you sprung loose a fashion model on a busy urban sidewalk, shot her in passing, and compared the results to found street photos? To push the issue, what if the comparison were to the foremost street photographer in history, Garry Winogrand? Would the fashion shots hold up in that company? Would they feel charged with street energy? In this context, would fashion still seem inherently different than candid photographs of strangers?

These are among the questions raised by Peter Lindbergh's latest book Lindbergh Winogrand Women, published in correlation with an exhibition in Dusseldorf last spring. Lindbergh's project intersperses photographs from Winogrand's 1975 book Women Are Beautiful with a heavier dose (roughly 3:1 ratio?) of his own On Street, a series based on a young fashion model walking the gritty sidewalks of contemporary New York. Lindbergh may employ a model but his inner street shooter yearns for unstaged candor. "I wanna photograph real people," he writes in the book, "not the model. What I'm interested in, is to find a certain reality behind the facade."

Lindbergh Winogrand Women Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Koenig Books, 2017.

Toward this end, he employs Winogrand's methodology. He uses a wide angle lens and black-and-white w conversion to capture the chaos of found pedestrian scenes in New York. His admiration for the master is clear, and the project is an homage of sorts. Winogrand quotes are followed in the book a page later by similar Lindbergh quotes. Winogrand's photos are generally sequenced with similar scenes shot by Lindbergh — Winogrand's photograph of women gesturing on a park bench followed by a Lindbergh photo of his model on a park bench, for one. Or Winogrand's posterior shot of a skirted woman framed at distance followed by Lindbergh's similar photo. Other sequences follow suit. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, it's clear Lindbergh is a Winogrand fan.

But the photographs from On Street have a tough time standing up next to those from Women Are Beautiful. To be fair that's not entirely Lindbergh's fault. Winogrand leaves all challengers in the dust. His snapshot aesthetic and restless curiosity may appear accessible to the casual observer — and perhaps entrancing to a fashion shooter — but its loose nature belies his mastery.

Lindbergh Winogrand Women Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Koenig Books, 2017.

Even though emulating Winogrand is a Sisyphean task, Lindbergh has given it a shot. But Lindbergh's photographs of a model walking the sidewalks feel like fashion, not street. Whatever realistic edge they possess is continually blunted by their main subject, a beautiful blonde model wearing haute couture: To his credit, Lindbergh has dispensed with makeup or excessive styling. He wants reality. But supermodels don't easily blend into the everyday. Dressed to the nines, interacting with no one, Lindbergh's subject is a slinky caricature of humanity, and the harder she tries to act pedestrian — staring ahead impassively, seemingly oblivious to the camera — the greater the visual discontinuity. The reader wants to place her on a Paris runway, not a filthy sidewalk.

Lindbergh Winogrand Women Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Koenig Books, 2017.

So we're back to apples and oranges. Interweaving Lindbergh's photos with Winogrand's is problematic. Yet the two photographers do share something in common. Both are prime exemplars of the male gaze. By his own admission Winogrand was particularly drawn to female subjects. "Whenever I saw a beautiful woman," he shrugged. "I gave my best to photograph her." Of course it wasn't just women. Winogrand was a rapacious people watcher and photographed everyone. But when his camera turned on women, street photography's exploitative nature and underlying power dynamics came to the fore.

If you buy the explanation offered by Ralph Goertz in the book's opening essay, Winogrand's male gaze was innocent enough. "Winogrand did not regard the women as objects," he surmises, "but he succeeded in bringing their inner beauty to the forefront." So Winogrand's Women Are Beautiful had nothing to do with objectifying the female body? Was it about "inner beauty" all along? That idea might come as a surprise to Helen Gary Bishop, who penned its introduction, or to the book's many perennial critics — it was generally panned upon release as shallow voyeurism, especially by feminists, and the criticism since has not abated.

Lindbergh Winogrand Women Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Koenig Books, 2017.

I don't mean to rehash Winogrand's sexism here. His male gaze may not be politically correct but it remains an essential strain in his character and his work. Of course since his time the photo world has generally become more aware and inclusive — helped along, ironically, by the critical reaction to Women Are Beautiful — bringing Winogrand's biases into sharper focus.

Lindbergh Winogrand Women
has a few production problems that hinder the effort. There are three essays, two of which are translated from German. Unfortunately these translations contain several grammatical errors and misspellings, and at least one short passage repeated erroneously. The layout into justified paragraphs is flawed. Some photographs are uncredited. A handful of Winogrand's color shots, published here for the first time and one of the book's highlights, is inexplicably missing captions. Eugene "Adget"'s name is misspelled. And so on. These errors are all minor. The real shame is they might have been ironed out with just a quick half hour of proofreading. The fact they remain in the book gives it a rushed, amateur quality. As a last small aside, the book's reproductions are somewhat dark and muddy.

Lindbergh Winogrand Women Photographs by Garry Winogrand and Peter Lindbergh. Koenig Books, 2017.

One corner of the photo universe where the male gaze remains ingrained and accepted is fashion. Surface appearance is prized above all. Youth, beauty, fitness, and gender are fetishized before being converted into images. Subsumed to the background are less visible traits, thoughts, and emotions, including Goertz's "inner beauty." In this environment the male gaze is integral. Thus, Lindbergh's infatuation with Winogrand seems quite natural. So perhaps fashion and street are not complete apples and oranges after all? Or at least the book hints in this direction, although perhaps unwittingly. "Two major photographers of the 21st century obsessed by women…" announces the jacket blurb, cementing the union without quite acknowledging its power dynamics. Like Women Are Beautiful, I suspect this book will give cultural critics material for years to come. — Blake Andrews

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BLAKE ANDREWS is a photographer based in Eugene, OR. He writes about photography at blakeandrews.blogspot.com.

Read more book reviews



photo-eye Gallery Celestial Photography:
Inspirations from the Sky
In light of the highly anticipated total solar eclipse happening across the United States on August 21st, 2017 photo-eye Gallery wanted to celebrate by selecting a handful of celestial inspired images from our flat files. Our curated selection includes exciting new work by represented artists Chris McCaw and Kate Breakey along with time-honored pieces by Linda Connor and Susannah Hays among others including Maggie Taylor, Cig Harvey, Chaco Terada and Alan Friedman.

In light of the highly anticipated total solar eclipse happening across the United States on August 21st, 2017 photo-eye Gallery wanted to celebrate by selecting a handful of celestial inspired images from our flat files. Our curated selection includes exciting new work by represented artists Chris McCaw and Kate Breakey along with time-honored pieces by Linda Connor and Susannah Hays among others including Maggie Taylor, Cig Harvey, Chaco Terada, Alan Friedman and Ernie Button.

To inquire, please contact the Gallery Staff at gallery@photoeye.com or 505-988-5152 x202.

May 28, 1900 © Linda Connor | Contact Print, Printing Out Paper, Gold Toned, 10 x 8"

Selection of Astronomical Orotones in Vintage Daguerreotype cases © Kate Breakey | Available in 2 sizes, each is unique.
Please inquire with Gallery Staff for pricing and availability. 

Sunburned GSP #910 (Utah), 2016 © Chris McCaw | Unique Silver-Gelatin Silver Paper Negative, 5 x 4"

Eclipse © Susannah Hays | Gelatin - Silver Print, 20 x 16", Edition of 25

Sadie & the Moon, Lake Megunticook, Maine, 2013 © Cig Harvey | C-Print, 28 x 28", Edition of 7
Star Dust IV © Chaco Terada | Archival Pigment Ink on Silk, 9 x 9", Edition of 3

Star gazer, 2015 © Maggie Taylor | Archival Pigment Print,  8 x 8", Edition of 15

2013 July 14 Summer Heat © Alan Friedman | Archival Pigment Print, 19 x 19", Edition of 15

Bowmore 135 © Ernie Button | Archival Pigment Print, 15 x 15", Edition of 20


Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by John A Bennette John A Bennette selects Inundation by Kevin O'Connell as Book of the Week.
InundationBy Kevin O'Connell
Self-published, 2017.
John A Bennette selects Inundation  self-published by Kevin O'Connell as Book of the Week.

"Kevin O'Connell's Inundation is a limited edition, hand-sewn art object that is a serious argument for the continued creation of photobooks. From its subtly patterned and unmarked cover to its end papers, the unnumbered and textless body of images, and the title and poem at its end, Inundation is a quiet and reflective meditation about the sea.

These monochromatic, camera-based images of the sea are representational, yet near abstractions. Taken over a few years along Oregon’s Pacific coast, they evoke the mysterious ties that bind man to the great bodies of water. Inundation evokes Homer's wine-dark sea, the great 19th-century romantic musical compositions, and the solitary everyman staring into the vastness for answers. There is the foam of Zeus that gives birth, the calm ebb and flow, and the darkness of lost souls that becomes part of legends.

On every page of Inundation the image bleeds off the edge. There is no room for borders nor words. The photographer seeks to immerse you in the moments, as if to shut out the world as he shares what he emotionally sees with you. This is a book we can turn to when we need space to float above — or fall through — the depths of the world we know."
— John A Bennette

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InundationBy Kevin O'ConnellSelf-published, 2017.
InundationBy Kevin O'ConnellSelf-published, 2017.




John A Bennette is a collector, lecturer, editor, and curator. He has curated the Hearst 8x10 Photography Biennial and is the former art director and art editor for South X South East Photography Magazine.

Book Review Ravens By Masahisa Fukase Reviewed by A/fixed From the highest peak to the deepest valley, Fukase’s photographs take the viewer on a powerful roller coaster ride through a period of Fukase’s career that was turbulent in its own right: the first images of the series were taken in 1975, as his marriage to his wife, Yoko Wanibe, began to disintegrate.
Ravens By Masahisa FukaseMack, 2017.
 
Ravens
Reviewed by A/fixed

Ravens.
Photographs by Masahisa Fukase.
Mack, London, England, 2017. 136 pp., 80 black-and-white illustrations, 10¼x10¼".

“In Ravens, Fukase’s work can be deemed to have reached its utmost height and to have also fallen to its greatest depth. The sense of isolation and solitude exposed in this work is so potent that it is agonizing to look at, or even to avert one’s gaze.” These ruminations were offered by Akira Hasegawa in the original edition of Ravens, photographer Masahisa Fukase’s 1986 masterpiece. Also featured in the latest reissue of the pivotal photo book offered by MACK Publishing, Hasegawa’s reflections offer a satisfying synthesis of what Fukase accomplishes in this book.

Ravens By Masahisa FukaseMack, 2017.

From the highest peak to the deepest valley, Fukase’s photographs take the viewer on a powerful roller coaster ride through a period of Fukase’s career that was turbulent in its own right: the first images of the series were taken in 1975, as his marriage to his wife, Yoko Wanibe, began to disintegrate. Inspired by a visit to his hometown on Hokkaido, Fukase began to chronicle his journey and continued to do so for nearly a decade as the personal and emotional chaos of divorce ensued.

Ravens By Masahisa FukaseMack, 2017.

For Fukase, the series began as a chronicle of his escape, both metaphorical and physical, and yet when he returned to Tokyo and prepared these images for exhibition, the theme of the raven became prominent. As he commented, in relation to one such image taken of crows flying overhead in Kanazawa: “I then had the idea that perhaps the ravens in the pitch-black night . . . could be captured using flash light.. . . The results were splendid.” Accordingly, the raven can be seen as having dual meaning in this series: on one hand, the symbolism of the bird as an isolated, even foreboding, presence alludes to the deeply introspective state that Fukase was experiencing at this point in his career. On the other, one can also see that Fukase’s desire to play with the balance of light and shadow within his images still reigns supreme. This play of contrast runs through Fukase’s other images, from the intimate portrait of a reclining female nude to a sweeping landscape view, and it speaks to Fukase’s fascination with the lingering legacy of the Provoke generation of Japanese photographers and their adherence to the are-bure-boke aesthetic in their images.

Ravens By Masahisa FukaseMack, 2017.

As one engages with Fukase’s Ravens, one must ask what form of isolation is truly being explored. As Hasegawa surmises later in his essay, “If there is one underlying theme in Fukase’s work, it is a sense of incompatibility with everything.” He goes on to suggest that Fukase was in a consistent state of disharmony with the work, and yet it would seem that the photographs of Ravens contradict such a relationship. Fukase perhaps felt a sense of detachment or disconnection as he took these images, but the frames themselves imply his deep connection with the natural world. The balance he strikes between his subjects and the striking vantage points he incorporates into his compositions results in a panoply of images that suggest a man seeking a new connection with the world rather than one accepting his perpetual incompatibility with it, a state of limbo never to be escaped.

Ravens By Masahisa FukaseMack, 2017.

Fukase’s career would unfortunately enter into such an oblivion only a few years after Ravens ’ publication: a fall down a flight of stairs in 1992 left Fukase struggling with a serious brain injury. He continued to take photographs, and he also experimented with drawing over some of his images, but the power of his work never quite surpassed Ravens . As a landmark in the Japanese photo book tradition, Ravens is an essential text for those who study or enjoy the field, and the MACK reprint of Ravens is sure to boost international access to the book’s brilliance.

Ravens By Masahisa FukaseMack, 2017.

First published in 1986, Ravens has since been lauded as a landmark, not only of Fukase’s career but also for the field of the Japanese photobook. So celebrated was its initial imprint that a second edition was issued in 1991 under the alternate title The Solitude of Ravens. Just this year, the London-based publisher MACK has issued a new, clothbound third edition of the text, restoring its original title to complement its 80 original images spread over 136 pages. Included are the essays by Hasegawa, and Tomo Kusaga, Masahisa Fukase Archives founder, both of which add a particular richness to the powerful series, now more than thirty years old. — A/fixed

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A/FIXED Through original interviews, essays, and book reviews, A/fixed seeks to connect western audiences with the rich photographic history of Japan. The first issue of this biannual newsprint journal, entitled Provoke Generation: Japanese Photography 60-70s, centers on the key figures in the field during a turbulent moment in history, as young, rebellious artists broke with traditions, upended the status quo, and took Japanese photography in a bold new direction. The inaugural issue of A/fixed journal is available on their website.





photo-eye Gallery Collecting Tips: Understanding the Print Process In the latest entry to our Collecting Series, photo-eye Gallery Staff describe four popular print types, what makes them special, and reasons to collect them.


For some time I've been ruminating on a series about collecting photography to help demystify the process. This summer we kicked off the series with a piece highlighting 5 basic tips to start your collection and then moved into some of our staff’s favorite images. Today we are going to bring our focus back to the basics by defining four common types of photographic prints, their strengths, and why to collect them.

NOW is a very exciting time for photography. New technologies have created unforeseen printing possibilities but have also caused a resurgence in classic processes — resulting in a slew of possibilities and a longer glossary of terms.  The range of what is considered 'photographic' has and is expanding. Occasionally, gallery visitors get caught up between the type of print and the process of creating the photographic image, and typically the two are related, although they don't need to be. This post is a guide to four of the most common types of photographic prints, how they are made, and why they may be a good fit for your collection.
– Anne Kelly, Gallery Director


Silver-Gelatin Prints

Capodacqua Lake, Capestrano, Abruzzo, Italy, 2016, Gelatin-Silver Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 25, $3000 
© Michael Kenna

Silver-Gelatin prints are papers coated with a layer of gelatin emulsion containing light sensitive silver salts and typically made from a film negative in the black and white darkroom. Introduced in the 1870’s, these prints became a favorable black and white print type from the turn of the 19th century to present day.

Photographers and collectors alike can always appreciate a gorgeous gelatin silver print for its rich tonal value and unique surface. For over a century, the traditional silver print has remained as a fundamental printing method and quintessential representative for the medium’s history.

Select Artists making Silver-Gelatin Prints:
Michael Kenna
Pentti Sammallahti
Edward Ranney
Hiroshi Watanabe
David H. Gibson
Mark Klett
Raymond Meeks
John Delaney
Steve Fitch



Archival Pigment Prints


Cloud caster, 2013, Archival Pigment Print,8x8” Image, Edition of 15, $1500– © Maggie Taylor
Archival Pigment Prints are nearly ubiquitous these days as many photographers continue to move their work out of the darkroom and onto the computer. Originating as a digital file, either from a camera or scanner, Archival Pigment Prints are created on professional inkjet printers utilizing refined particles of tonal pigment resilient to degrading environmental elements. Ok, what does that mean? Essentially Archival Pigment Prints offer exquisite rich tone, black-and white or color, and can last for hundreds of years – far longer than the traditional chemical color C-Print.

In the past ten years, we've also seen a renaissance in paper choice for Archival Pigment Printers, including thick matte cotton rag and the introduction of a clay base just like Silver-Gelatin Prints. These papers have been especially freeing for color photographers who were previously limited to plastic based resin coated papers. We love materials at photo-eye and how they can affect the interpretation and feeling of an image.

Far from push-button, mastering Pigment Printing means possessing an intense understanding of your materials, including paper, ink choice, and the profiles used to transform a digital file into a physical object.

Select Artists Making Archival Pigment Prints:
Maggie Taylor
Julie Blackmon
Mitch Dobrowner
Tom Chambers
Jock Sturges
Jamie Stillings
Laurie Tümer
Richard Tuschman
Brad Wilson
Zoë Zimmerman


Chromogenic Prints


Red Curtain, 2016, Chromogenic Print, 14x14" Image, Edition of 10, $2500 – © Cig Harvey
Chromogenic Prints, or C-Prints, are made from a color negative, slide, or digital image (known as a digital C – print). A color photograph in which the paper has three emulsion layers of light sensitive silver salts. Each layer is sensitized to a different primary color - red, blue or green. During processing, chemicals are added that form dyes of the appropriate color in the emulsion layers. The silver salts are bleached out and only the color dyes remain. This process was developed in the 1930s and became quite popular upon Kodak’s introduction of Kodacolor film produced from 1942 to 1963. C – prints remained as the most common color printing method until the recent shift to archival pigment prints.

Chromogenic prints often speak to photographers and collectors with a more traditional or purist approach to the medium. What makes these color prints unique, or stand apart from more contemporary pigment prints, is that they are made from an exposure that requires light – photography’s key ingredient.

Select Artists Making C-Prints:
Cig Harvey
Terri Weifenbach
Carla van de Puttelaar
Liz Hickok


Platinum Prints


Dried Clematis Blossom, 1995, Platinum/Palladium Print, 10x8" Image, Edition of 25, $750 – © James Pitts 
Like most other alternative photographic processes, the Platinum Print's roots stretch back to the nineteenth century. Born of noble metals, platinum prints became prominent among photographers in the late 1800s and early 1900s as photographer's sought to elevate the medium's artistic status by creating images both elegant and handmade. 

The platinum printing technique consists of hand-sensitizing fine cotton rag paper with a custom emulsion cocktail built specifically for each image. Once dry, negatives are laid against the paper and contact printed via a UV light source — such as the sun. The procedure is specific, peculiar, and laborious, with a single platinum print sometimes taking up to eight hours to render.

Although complicated, the aesthetic and archival benefits of using platinum materials is astonishing. Compared to contemporary printing procedures, platinum prints exhibit a long and graceful tonal range, deep luscious blacks, a sense of three-dimensionality, and unique luminous quality. When properly cared for, platinum prints are also very permanent and can last thousands of years. 

Select Artists making Platinum Prints
•   Ronald Cowie
•   Teri Havens
•   Nick Brandt
•   Bob Cornelis




For more information and to purchase prints please contact 
Gallery Staff at 505.988.5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Forrest Soper Forrest Soper selects The Sea in the Darkness Calls by Bryan Thomas as Book of the Week.
The Sea in the Darkness CallsBy Bryan Thomas
Self-published, 2016.
Forrest Soper selects The Sea in the Darkness Calls  self-published by Bryan Thomas as Book of the Week.

"The Sea in the Darkness Calls by Bryan Thomas is a brilliant, self-published artist’s book exploring the effects of global warming on the state of Florida. Printed on 11”x15” heavy newsprint, this wonderful, unbound publication is full of environmental portraits, landscapes, scientific predictions, and vintage postcards. Rather than focus on the current effects of climate change, Thomas looks to the future, photographing Florida’s coastline before it is swallowed by the impending rise of the sea level. As a result, the photographs in this book become representational, rather than scientific, as the book transforms into a melancholy document of a disappearing landscape.

By 2100, it is estimated that 9% of Florida’s current landmass will be underwater. Despite this ominous foresight, coastal development continues to this day, and 75% of Florida’s population lives in coastal areas. Scientists predict that this will displace millions of individuals and cause billions of dollars’ worth of damage to existing infrastructure. Throughout the book, text blocks continuously inform the viewer about the future effects of global warming, contrasting the photographs, which focus primarily on the past and the present.

The book begins and ends with photographs of vintage postcards. Thomas uses the hand-painted imagery found on postcards, billboards, and murals to depict the idealized version of Florida’s coastline. Going so far as to include a vintage postcard in every copy of the book, Thomas seems to attempt to capture the Memories of Florida that existed in his childhood, a romantic paradise that is becoming increasingly endangered.

The straight photographs in the book focus on the present. Intimate environmental portraits of people who live, work, and otherwise interact with the coastline fill the pages. A young woman rides a horse in the ocean as a fisherman sunbathes on a pier. Commercial buildings, houses, and recreational centers dot the pages, all with the knowledge that they will soon be under water. Often photographed at sunset or twilight, there is a hint of loss that permeates these photographs. One cannot separate the faces from the chilling scientific facts presented in this book.

The Sea in the Darkness Calls is a loving, last look at a land that is rapidly disappearing. A bittersweet document of what exists before it passes, this book is as poetic as it is informative. Haunting, sad, intimate, and loving, this book is sure to educate and inspire."  — Forrest Soper

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The Sea in the Darkness CallsBy Bryan Thomas. Self-published, 2016.
The Sea in the Darkness CallsBy Bryan Thomas. Self-published, 2016.


Forrest Soper is a photographer and artist based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico. A graduate of the Santa Fe University of Art and Design, he also has previously worked at Bostick & Sullivan. Forrest is the Editor of photo-eye Blog.
http://forrestsoper.com/


Book Review Francesca Woodman By Francesca Woodman Reviewed by Arista Slater-Sandoval The thorough book provides essays by art historian Chris Townsend, boasts over 250 plates (some work never before published), includes numerous documents and sketches from journals, and features a short response essay by George Woodman, Francesca’s father.
Francesca Woodman Photographs by Francesca Woodman. 
Text by Chris Townsend. Phaidon Press, 2016. 
 
Francesca Woodman
Reviewed by Arista Slater-Sandoval.

Francesca Woodman.
Photographs by Francesca Woodman. Text by Chris Townsend.
Phaidon Press, London, England, 2016. In English. 256 pp., 9¾x11½x1".  

Photographic surveys are often large tomes that sit on the coffee table, containing works such as the lighthouses of the New England coast, fifty years of National Geographic images, dogs diving into water after balls, etc. A brave few will peek into their generally oversized pages with full-bleed, vibrant color images to find a welcomed discovery of engaging work. Francesca Woodman, published by Phaidon, is such a book, presenting us with a sweeping overview of the young artist’s career. Woodman is a complex and dynamic example the uninhibited exploratory nature of the artist’s pursuit of discovery.

The thorough book provides essays by art historian Chris Townsend, boasts over 250 plates (some work never before published), includes numerous documents and sketches from journals, and features a short response essay by George Woodman, Francesca’s father. The book contains a wealth of academic writing and wonderful reproductions of Woodman’s work. It’s a fine addition to any photobook collection.

Francesca Woodman Photographs by Francesca Woodman. Text by Chris Townsend. Phaidon Press, 2016.

Townsend’s essays, which discuss Woodman in relation to American Gothic, Surrealism, feminism, post-minimalism, and the self-portrait, provide a versatile and deep analysis of Woodman and her work, securely fastening her place in the history of photography and her influence on contemporary photographers. Townsend demystifies the romantic notion that Woodman’s work is studied or alluring because of her suicide. Townsend argues that her imagery does not simply reflect a morose young woman searching for help and understanding in a tumultuous time, but instead depicts a young artist exploring her visual language, her femininity, and the photographic medium. He encourages the reader to not look at her work with grief surrounding a young death, but the loss of an experimental and daring female voice in photography’s history.

Francesca Woodman Photographs by Francesca Woodman. Text by Chris Townsend. Phaidon Press, 2016.

The work is organized into five different sections, allowing for a progression in Woodman’s visual and performative language within the frame. With the exception of the occasional male nude, Woodman’s body proliferates most of the compositions within varying manipulations, environments, and props. Objects carry great weight, both intimate and foreign in nature. The interaction of an object with, or on, the body in relation to the body’s position in the frame and surroundings helps to create the complex language that marks Woodman’s style. What she decides to hide behind, crawl around, hang from, or cover herself with, all vary drastically based on the environment she inhabits. The placement of the body within the frame is at times disjointed and elicits concern for the contortions Woodman imposes on herself. Woodman’s actions in front of the camera are disconcerting, revelatory, and embarrassing in their intimacy. However, that transformation imposed on the body through environment, prop or motion is the vocabulary that makes her imagery so compelling. The object, body, and space in tandem create the cryptic images that viewers are still enthralled with today.

Francesca Woodman Photographs by Francesca Woodman. Text by Chris Townsend. Phaidon Press, 2016.

An equally important aspect of Woodman’s work is how she uses photography to document her performances. Photography has a rich history of recording body-centric performance art, which was popular in the 1970s when Woodman made her work. The book’s layout emphasizes this as it presents a sequence of two to as many as five images from what appears to be the same photoshoot. If we think about the time between exposures and how Woodman is continually in motion, then the image becomes a document of the performance. Woodman moves around in the frame from exposure to exposure, thus tracking her contorted actions like a dance. Woodman’s work brings the viewer into the studio as if to witness a performance that explores female identity, but also pushes the boundaries of the medium itself. Using long exposures to track motion and distort her body, she challenges the expectations of still photography.

Francesca Woodman Photographs by Francesca Woodman. Text by Chris Townsend. Phaidon Press, 2016.
Rich with Woodman’s incomparable images and informative essays, this book provides an accessible, but fresh examination of her too-brief career. — Arista Slater-Sandoval

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ARISTA SLATER-SANDOVAL  was born and raised in Grand Rapids Michigan. She moved in 2007 to washington D.C. to pursue a BFA in photography at the Corcoran College of Art and Design. After completing her BFA, Arista moved to Cambridge MA, and attended the College of Art and Design at Lesley University where she completed her MFA in Fine Art Photography in 2013. While in grad school she focused in gum bichromate, and large scale image transfers. Currently Arista lives and works in New Mexico with her husband while traveling and working on her various mediums of choice.

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photo-eye Gallery Interview and New Portfolio – Molly McCall's Home Movies photo-eye Gallery is excited to introduce Molly McCall’s Home Movies to the Photographer’s Showcase. In Home Movies McCall employs the cinematic qualities of found vintage photographs to construct narratives exploring the passage of time, transition, transformation, and loss. Gallery Associate Lucas Shaffer spoke with Molly McCall about the series, her overall photographic practice, and how she began making images.

Shallow Water, Hand-Painted & Varnished Toned Silver Gelatin Print, Edition of 5 – © Molly McCall
photo-eye Gallery is excited to introduce Molly McCall’s Home Movies to the Photographer’s Showcase. In Home Movies McCall employs the cinematic qualities of found vintage photographs to construct narratives exploring the passage of time, transition, transformation, and loss. Each scene is directed by McCall as she hand-paints color swatches and pattern across the enlarged vintage images essentially reframing them to reveal gestures of unfinished stories and memory's murky sense. The resulting images are familiar yet intriguing visions of vernacular settings. Gallery Associate Lucas Shaffer spoke with Molly McCall about the series, her overall photographic practice, and how she began making images.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Laura M. André Laura M. André selects Archiving Eden by Dornith Doherty as Book of the Week.
Archiving Edenby Dornith DohertySchilt Publishing, 2017.




Laura M. André picks Dornith Doherty's Archiving Eden, from Schilt Publishing, as Book of the Week.

In 2015, Syrian researchers made the first ever withdrawal from the Svalbard Global Seed Vault to recover wheat, barley, and grass samples that had been lost when the Aleppo-based seed bank was destroyed in that country's civil war. That is exactly why the Svalbard "Doomsday Vault" exists. To date there are over 1,700 repositories like the one formerly based in Aleppo (which has since moved to Beirut), designed to function as natural safe deposit boxes for food crops and plant diversity in case of natural or man-made disasters.

The Svalbard Global Seed Vault, located on Norway's Spitsbergen Island, functions as a modern-day Noah's Ark for plant life: a mother backup for the many, more localized backups scattered throughout the world. Ten years ago, artist Dornith Doherty, now a Distinguished Research Professor at the University of North Texas, read an article about the last-resort vault in The New Yorker. Doherty's photographic work had long focused on environmental concerns, but that New Yorker article led her to embark on an investigation into worldwide vaults and archives designed to preserve genetic plant material and seeds for hundreds and even thousands of years. 

Doherty's resulting monograph collects both her documentary photographs of facilities and her digital x-ray collages of seeds and plants, tied together with a poetic, expository essay by Elizabeth Avedon. Beyond the spectacular cover plate and illustrated endpapers, which illustrate Doherty's digital x-ray collages of seeds and plantlets in deep Delft/indigo blues that recall cyanotypes, unfortunately the images presented in this blog post and in the publisher's promotional material absolutely fail to convey the richness of the book's content. If you can't visit the seed banks in person—which, unless you are a bona fide scientist or an artist with really good, hard-won connections, you can't—you absolutely must get access to this book. Only then will the simultaneous hopefulness and pessimism of this work begin to exert their effects on you. — Laura M. André

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Archiving Edenby Dornith DohertySchilt Publishing, 2017.
Archiving Edenby Dornith DohertySchilt Publishing, 2017.




Laura M. André is the manager of photo-eye's bookstore. She received her PhD in art history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and taught photo history at the University of New Mexico before leaving academia to work with photography books.

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