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photo-eye Gallery New Work: Susannah Hays – Biblioteca photo-eye Gallery is excited to present Biblioteca a new photographic series featuring enigmatic medieval tomes made of plant and animal flesh.

Sacra Theologie, Archival Pigment Print, 17x17" Image, Edition of 15, $950 – Susannah Hays
photo-eye Gallery is excited to present Biblioteca, a new series by represented artist Susannah Hays.
Approaching her photographic practice as a philosopher, Susannah Hays experiences poetic material renderings of our phenomenological world. Investigating tangible objects, each of her camera and cameraless images reveal a hidden beauty that asks us to remember where things come from—how they arrive and why they endure.

Biblioteca, her series of medieval books from the Tuscan region of Castiglion Fiorentino, sit on their shelves undisturbed. While DNA research unravels when and where they were made, visible traces of who touched, held and kissed them offer lasting impressions. Enlarged larger than life, we experience their threadbare spines. Made of plant and animal flesh, their shapes are in some sort of enigmatic way, like us. Standing in silent dignity, century after century, they prevail as they always were—vessels of embodied knowledge.



Prints from Biblioteca are available in limited editions, please inquire with 
Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com about sizes, prices, and availability.

Concetti, Archival Pigment Print, 17x22" Image, Edition of 15, $950 – Susannah Hays 

Calice Sacro, Archival Pigment Print, 17x22" Image, Edition of 15, $950 – Susannah Hays 

Storia Villa, Archival Pigment Print, 17x22" Image, Edition of 15, $950 – Susannah Hays 

Print prices are subject to change as the editions sell, and were accurate at the time of publication. Please contact Gallery Staff for up-to-date pricing and availability.
505-988-5152 x 202 | gallery@photoeye.com




Announcement – Calice Sacro
If you happen to be traveling this spring, Susannah Hays' Calice Sacro is opening Saturday, March 3rd at the Atelier Alfonso Fratteriani Bianchi at the Rocca di Sant'Apollinare in Perugia, Italy. Calice Sacro will feature a body of work spanning two decades including prints from Biblioteca as well as Hays' earlier Empty Bottle photograms.

Calice Sacro is Susannah’s second exhibition in Italy. In 2012 she received a 2-month residency fellowship at Scuola Internazionale di Grafica in Venezia where she presented VERNICIATURA.


photo-eye Gallery Brushed by Light, Interview with Carla van de Puttelaar photo-eye Gallery is pleased to present two new portfolios by represented artist Carla van de Puttelaar, The Rembrandt Series and Adornments – with work from her monograph by the same name. Gallery Associate Lucas Shaffer spoke with van de Puttelaar regarding her process, how she thinks about image making, and what she's currently working on.

Rembrandt Series, Archival Pigment Print, 18x12" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar
Light is physical. Existing as both wave and particle, light constantly grazes us with its fingertips on an infinitesimal level. Nowhere is the tactile nature of light more apparent than the soft and graceful work of Dutch photographer Carla van de Puttelaar. Through her lens, van de Puttelaar uses cool broad light against a dark and rich void to reveal the sensitivity of skin, the fragility of a flower petal, or a ripple of tree bark. Her images are intimate, personal and vulnerable. Through light, Carla states that her work "allows the eye to touch the skin on many different levels."

photo-eye Gallery is pleased to present two new portfolios by represented artist Carla van de Puttelaar, The Rembrandt Series and Adornments – with work from her monograph by the same name. Gallery Associate Lucas Shaffer spoke with van de Puttelaar regarding her process, how she thinks about image making, and what she's currently working on.

Rembrandt Series, Archival Pigment Print, 12x18" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar


Lucas Shaffer:     How did the Rembrandt Series begin?

Carla van de Puttelaar:     I have been inspired by the Dutch and Flemish masters for as long as I remember, especially by the northern light, the clair-obscur, the use of fabrics and the serene stillness in their works. When I was asked by the Rembrandt House Museum in Amsterdam to do a series inspired by Rembrandt nudes in order to be shown alongside their exhibition Rembrandt’s Naked Truth I instantly felt a deep attachment to this project. I worked with an intense flow of inspiration, which resulted in a large body of work, much of which has now been published in my new book Adornments  – which is a testimony to the last six years of my photographic passion.


Rembrandt's Reclining Female Nude, 1658, Etching on Paper (Left)
Rembrandt Series, Archival Pigment Print, 12x18" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar 
(Right)

LS:     What did you find particularly inspiring about Rembrandts drawings and etchings?

CvdP:     I already mentioned the incredible use of light, in which Rembrandt shows his genius at his best. The etchings show the ultimate control over the craftsmanship of hatchings and the lines of the ink, often quick and just right. I see and feel the virtuosity of lines.  Reclining Female Nude shows Rembrandt's skill in all respects as he nearly lets the woman vanish into the shadows. I used this etching for my photo of a reclining woman, whose dark skin nearly merges with the black background, while the light emphasizes the soft glances of her skin.

LS:     Did anything surprise you during the creation of the Rembrandt series?

CvdP:     I was surprised to find out things about myself, how I loved the combinations, to work with the models, their beauty, the curves, the skin and the combination with fabrics and how I could use these fabrics to build up the composition, like Rembrandt did, but also painters like Van Dyck, Reynolds and Singer Sargent.

Rembrandt Series, Archival Pigment Print, 12x18" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar

LS:     How are the tableaux made? What is your process like?

CvdP:     First of all I approached various models, several of them I had already worked with. Some I asked because it felt that they made a connection with Rembrandt’s work, whereas others I have known for a long time and they have become my muses over the years. Moreover, I have collected costumes and fabrics for at least 25 years, always loving them, but hardly using them up till then, and suddenly I had a purpose for them, combining the love for photography, nudes, portraiture, skin, fabrics, and dress into one. I work a lot from inspiration on the spot: models, fabrics, the artworks that inspired me in my head, the light, the interaction with me and between models, all these aspects shape in my mind what I want to do and allow me to build up a final image. It is like acting in a play, or to hear a piece of music: there is a combined inspiration that leads to the climax the magical moment, caught in a photograph.

Rembrandt Series, Archival Pigment Print, 12x18" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar


LS:     Did you encounter any particularly powerful or challenging situations while creating the series?

CvdP:     Until [The Rembrandt Series] I never worked with more than two models at the same time.  At the last moment, a model also had time to come over, but only at a time that I was working with two other models. I wanted to work with the third model as well and so I sort of put her in between the two other models. I let her bind the two other models together visually making connections with both of the other models. It allowed me to play even more with compositions and observe the interactions between the models, and to capture the moments of brilliance. I also became much more interested in history paintings, and sculptures of mythological scenes such as Pluto and Proserpina by Bernini. I love the tension and challenges, they give me the highest focus to create artworks.

Hortus Nocturnum, 2013, Archival Pigment Print, 18x12" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar


LS:     Most of your work has centered around portraiture; why did you begin photographing flowers?

CvdP:     Flowers have inspired me, by their power and fragility. I began making the work when I looked at a bunch of incredible roses that I got from friends while the sun was flowing into my kitchen playing over and through the petals of the white roses with soft pink hues, I felt that I had to capture it. I needed to express the feeling that I got inside enjoying the immense beauty of them at that moment.

LS:     Are there similarities for you between your previous bodies of work and Hortus Nocturnum,
the flower Series?

CvdP:     Yes, in a way the flowers present themselves to me like individual creatures and I have a special attraction for some. For example, flowers move and bend like dancers, their glace, their petals shining through showing their fragility and veins, their slow movements changing rapidly through all the stages of their lives – sheer beauty and deep drama combined in one. I am able to follow them and catch just the right moments.

Hortus Nocturnum, 2013, Archival Pigment Print, 18x12" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar

LS:     Your images have been described as fragile or sensitive — do you relate with those descriptors or is there something else you see in your subjects?

CvdP:     Indeed I do relate to those descriptors, but as said before I also relate to the beauty and drama of life —and ultimately death. As for the women, my portrayal has been described at other-worldly,  untouchable, and yes they are, they also demand respect and show power in their own delicate way. The inner beauty and power of women.

Carla van de Puttelaar in studio
Image: Fred Meijer
LS:     What is the portrait process like for you? Is it collaborative between you and the model, or do you give explicit direction?

CvdP:     Both, it is important to observe, to capture what they have to offer you and which enables you to create artworks, but also I see situations that I want to create and enhance, so in that case I give directions. Spontaneous inspiration leads me through a path to the ultimate image.

LS:     How do you find and build rapport with your models?

First of all, I must have an instant feeling of connection. When I see a model there must be an urge to ask her to pose for me. I cannot say how it works, the feeling is instinctive. And while working with a person, you observe, talk and capture their "own-ness" and combine it with your thoughts to create images. Some of the models I only photograph once, but others have posed for me several times over 10-20 years. Some have become friends, others just left their image and disappeared from my life.

Galateas, 2016, Archival Pigment Print, 18x12" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar

LS:     Light is so essential to the nature of your work. Can you tell me a bit about your relationship with light - what are you looking for?

CvdP:     Light is one of the most important assets of my work. I only use natural light for my photography and it remains an ever-changing source of inspiration for me. Each light, northern light, sunlight, half clouded, every situation brings me new possibilities, just like it has been for Rembrandt, Vermeer, Metsu, Sweerts, and others. It is fascinating to see each time that by changing a bit in the position of a hand or face and make a huge difference.

Untitled, Archival Pigment Print, 18x12" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar

LS:     You've mentioned in previous interviews that you see your portraits as autobiographical, that your models assist you in telling your story. Do you still feel like that's the case with your recent series?

CvdP:     Yes, this is still the case!

LS:  How do these images continue to tell your story?

CvdP:     Through my models, I can express myself as a woman, show the (inner) beauty and strength of women using both expression and gesture. Beauty as I perceive it. Presently, it appears that there is a strict mandate about how women should look. Erasing the skin, smoothing it to a flat surface, plastic, with no need or possibility to breathe, whereas, all these signs of life, enhance the "own-ness" of a person. But maybe even more now, through the internet, a certain kind of fashionable beauty is forced upon. Whereas, I feel like it is most important to cherish and celebrate the small details, movements, and "own-ness" of a model.

Rembrandt Series, Archival Pigment Print, 18x12" Image, Edition of 8 – Carla van de Puttelaar

LS:     What does "own-ness" mean to you?

CvdP:     I mean that people have their own specific personalities: habits, movements, but also the structure of the skin, the form, and gaze of their eyes and some things in a specific person are so distinct, it's so very personal, and even stronger when these traits are merged together.

Amber Butchart – Tutor Tailor – Carla van de Puttelaar
LS:     Can you tell us what you are you working on now?

CvdP:     I'm  currently working on a portrait series of prominent and promising women in the art world, such as Maria Balshaw and Fariba Farshad, dressed in fabulous clothes by fashion designers, vintage clothes, or wrapped in exotic fabrics. This new series will first be exhibited from 16-31 May 2018 at The Weiss Gallery in London – famous for its Tudor portraiture.

Carla van de Puttelaar photographing on location
Image: Fred Meijer
The decision to showcase personal, powerful or designer garments in the portrait emphasizes the character of the sitter, just as clothes have often played an important role in portraiture for centuries. For example, in Tudor portraits are often impressive expressions of fashion.

Overall, I want to show the power of these women as a group, but also the variety of the individual women on various levels, such as age, stage of their careers, cultural differences and various occupations. They include artists, art historians, curators, collectors, designers, directors and journalists working for example in contemporary art, or with old master paintings, etcetera. Over past decades, women have emerged from the shadows [in the art world], and are continuing to shine brighter, but up till recently they, somehow, often remained out of the limelight. This has begun to change, and I want to show this change by photographing these women. I want to show their face to the world and connect young women with the older more experienced members of this group.

– photo-eye

For more information about Carla van de Puttelaar, and to purchase prints, please reach out to 
Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x 202, or gallery@photoeye.com




Carla van de Puttelaar's stunning monograph Adornments is now available at photo-eye. Published in late 2017 by Fw: Books in Amsterdam, Adornments is an exhaustive 270 collection of recent works by the Dutch photographer made over a 6 year period. Images from both portfolios debuting today on the photo-eye Gallery website appear in this gorgeous edition.

Adornments 
Photographs by Carla van de Puttelaar.
Fw: Books, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2017. In English. 270 pp., color illustrations, 9¾x13¼x1½".

» Purchase Adornments




Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Laura M. André Laura M. André selects The Louisiana Book, with photographs by Rineke Dijkstra as Book of the Week.
The Louisiana Book, by Rineke Dijkstra. 
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art and Koenig Books, 2017.

Laura M. André selects The Louisiana Book by Rineke Dijkstra, from The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art and Koenig Books, as Book of the Week.


While the decision to acquire a given photography book obviously varies from person to person according to his or her collecting tastes and objectives, there really are some books that are simply no-brainers. Unless you — for some reason — simply abhor portraiture, or photographs of people for that matter, the new Rineke Dijkstra retrospective catalogue from Denmark's Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is a must-have.

Not only does The Louisiana Book present all the images from Dijkstra's formidable and unforgettable series, including representative still images culled from her video work; its stellar essays and reference texts render it the gold-standard, go-to Dijkstra source.

I'm sure I'm not the only one who's had difficulty tracking down complete Dijkstra series in hard-to-find publications and online, and in terms of access to this historically important artist's work, The Louisiana Book  delivers. While many images from Beach Portraits have been widely published, and we've caught glimpses of Bullfighters, New MothersAlmerisa, and Olivier, I'm positively giddy to be able to linger over Streets, Family Portraits, and Studio.

Dijkstra's portraiture is, of course, not limited to the photographic stilling of time. It's really all about capturing transitions, which is similar, but not quite the same thing. This brilliant and engaging concept has served Dijkstra well for nearly three decades and it looks like it might never get old. This is due, in part, to her incomparable technique and rigor, which really cannot be duplicated.

Purchase Book

The Louisiana Book by Rineke Dijkstra. Louisiana Museum of Modern Art and Koenig Books, 2017.
The Louisiana Book by Rineke Dijkstra. Louisiana Museum of Modern Art and Koenig Books, 2017.



Laura M. André received her PhD in art history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and taught photo history at the University of New Mexico before leaving academia to work with photobooks. She is the manager of photo-eye's book division.


photo-eye Gallery Prints from the Heart – Last Minute Gifts If a picture is worth 1000 words, then nothing says I love you like the gift of photography. The photo-eye Gallery team has curated a selection of beautiful, masterfully printed images currently on hand in our Santa Fe Gallery, ready to pick up in time for Valentine’s Day next Wednesday.

Mitch Dobrowner – Heart and Cloud, 2016, Archival Pigment Print, 20x30" Image, Collective Edition of 40, $2,500
If a picture is worth 1000 words, then nothing says I love you like the gift of photography. The photo-eye Gallery team has curated a selection of beautiful, masterfully printed images currently on hand in our Santa Fe Gallery and ready to pick up in time for Valentine’s Day next Wednesday. These photographs all warm the heart with romantic notions and symbols of love. So for the collector, photographer or art lover in your life, look no further for the perfect gift. Enjoy!
– Savannah Sakry, Gallery Associate 

For further information on shipping options, cut-off times, and of course to purchase prints, please contact Gallery Staff directly at 505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com



Tom Chambers – Late for Dinner, 14x14" Archival Pigment Print, Edition of 20, $1150
Pentti Sammallahti – Boulders Beach, South Africa, 2002, Gelatin-Silver Print, 7.3x6" Image, $1300 
Pentti Sammallahti – Seoul, Korea, 2016, Gelatin-Silver Print, 6.8x6.3" Image, $1300 
Kate Breakey – Common Ground Dove, Toned Gelatin Silver Print, 17x14" Image, Editon of 7, $1150
Maggie Taylor – Later, 2017, 22x22" image, Archival Pigment Print, Edition of 10, $4,500
Michael Kenna – Montecito Garden, Study 14, 2006, Gelatin-Silver Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 25, $3000 

David H. Gibson – Water Plant Lace, Colorado Rocky Mountains, CO, Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 5x13" Image,
Edition of 25, $400 
Kate Breakey – Rose, Archival Pigment Print, Glass, 24kt Gold, 8x8" Image, Edition of 20, $1,400

Monographs by Represented Artists


No Ordinary Days
Photographs by Maggie Taylor.
Jerry N. Uelsmann, Inc., Coral Gables, Florida, USA, 2013. 168 pp., 120 color illustrations, 13x11".

Signed copies available!
$95.00
» Purchase

On This Earth, A Shadow Falls 
Photographs by Nick Brandt.
DAP/Big Life Editions, 2013. 192 pp., 90 illustrations, 13¼x15½".

Signed Copies Available
$130.00
» Purchase

Mont St Michel 
Photographs by Michael Kenna.
Nazraeli Press, Tucson, USA, 2007. 84 pp., 64 duotone plates., 8x12".

Signed Copies Available!
$75.00
» Purchase


All print prices current at the time this post was published. Prices are subject to change as editions sell. Please inquire with Gallery Staff regarding current prices.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Forrest Soper Forrest Soper selects Chai Wan Fire Station by Chan Dick as Book of the Week.
Chai Wan Fire Station By Chan DickCase Publishing, 2017.
Forrest Soper selects Chai Wan Fire Station by Chan Dick from Case Publishing as Book of the Week.

"Chai Wan Fire Station by Chan Dick was originally published in 2015 in a small edition of 100 copies. After winning several notable awards, the book quickly went out of print. Now, thanks to Case Publishing, the book has been beautifully re-designed and is available once again.

For fifteen months, Chan Dick photographed the Chai Wan Fire Station in Hong Kong through the window of his bathroom. Standing on his toilet, he would point his camera downward to the events occurring 150 feet below him. The result may be one of the more successful photographic series I have seen in quite some time.

Set on a tennis court, Chan Dick’s photographs show the firemen’s training exercises, volleyball games, and school tours — all with the same green clay tennis court as a background. Paint and fire hoses alike create formal geometric lines and shapes while evaporating water and tire tracks subtly demonstrate the passage of time. The uniforms of the firefighters provide a theatrical formalism to these candid shots. Despite the striking similarity in the photographs, the book never becomes tedious — each photograph is truly unique and captivating.

Chai Wan Fire Station’s
brilliant use of minimal geometry is merely a foundation for this breathtaking photo book. Masterfully made, this book doesn’t rely on design gimmicks or an emotional backstory; rather, it excels because of its elegant simplicity. From 1,500 photographs, the final edit was reduced to a mere 39 images, transforming the book from yet another monolithic taxonomy into a poetic reflection of time and space. Chai Wan Fire Station is a breathtaking photobook that should be celebrated." — Forrest Soper

Purchase Book

Chai Wan Fire Station By Chan DickCase Publishing, 2017.
Chai Wan Fire Station By Chan DickCase Publishing, 2017.


Forrest Soper is an artist and photographer based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Forrest is the editor of photo-eye Blog, a former photochemical lab technician at Bostick & Sullivan, and a graduate of the Santa Fe University of Art and Design.







Book Review Expired Paper By Alison Rossiter Reviewed by David Ondrik Alison Rossiter’s monograph Expired Paper is a beautiful photobook published by Radius Books and Yossi Milo Gallery. It reproduces Rossiter’s recent photographic oeuvre of abstract, camera-less photographs that conceptually and visually owe more to minimalist and abstract painters than to photographers.
Expired Paper. 
By Alison Rossiter. Radius Books/Yossi Milo Gallery, 2017.
 
Expired Paper
Reviewed by David Ondrik

Expired Paper.
Photographs by Alison Rossiter. Text by Leah Ollman.
Radius Books/Yossi Milo Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 2017. 196 pp., 90 illustrations, 11x12¾".

Alison Rossiter’s monograph Expired Paper is a beautiful photobook published by Radius Books and Yossi Milo Gallery. It reproduces Rossiter’s recent photographic oeuvre of abstract, camera-less photographs that conceptually and visually owe more to minimalist and abstract painters than to photographers. As such, Rossiter’s non-objective abstraction may not find its primary audience among photography devotees, as there are no straight photographs. Instead, there’s a range of (mostly) monochromatic images that are fundamentally about light, shadow, contemplation, and marks made with the passing of time.

Because her work uses photographic materials in an unorthodox manner, it’s essential to address her process. For the most part, Rossiter uses antique, black-and-white silver-gelatin paper manufactured (and expired) in the early-20th century. Though the artist’s hand is present in the work, the images are very much in line with the Surrealist movement’s Automatic Drawing, where rational control was relinquished to allow the subconscious to come forward. Instead of exposing her expired paper to light through a negative and an enlarger, the images in Expired Paper rely on the latent image exposed over the long life of the paper. Even though silver paper may have been kept out of direct light, over decades the still-sensitive emulsion can be exposed to wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum that don’t normally cause a visible impact. The images Rossiter coaxes from the chemicals are visually abstract records of the paper’s history — how well it was preserved, the stability of manufacturing, temperature, humidity, cosmic rays, muons, etc. These vagaries are what has produced the resulting image.


Rossiter’s titles reflect this, as well as playfully riffing on the convention of fact-based photographic titles. Rather than use the names of people and places, she lists the brand of paper, its date of expiration, and the date she processed it. This data-driven categorization, rather than a Pictorialist poeticism, harkens back to the photo traditions of observation, organization, and comparison that her work otherwise leaves behind.



Expired Paper is separated into chapters that correspond to different bodies of work. While they all share the same process, each body differs in how the developer is applied. Latent resulted from immersing the silver paper fully in developer and accepting whatever image came up with minimal intervention by the artist. These works most directly reference Rothko and Ad Reinhardt, though they are intimate in scale rather than immense. The images in Tarnish all exhibit metallic silver precipitating out of the silver bromide (or chloride) in the emulsion. These are intimate photo-objects, which is emphasized by the unexpected inclusion of the hand holding each piece of paper. The opening image in this chapter, Defender Disco, expired October 1911, processed 2016, is a sheet of pure texture that simultaneously suggests Vija Celmins’ Night Sky drawings and Hubble Telescope images of nebulae and gas clouds. Landscapes, Pools, and Dips + Pours are all made by submerging part of the paper in developer to create the images.


The way the Pools chapter is presented breaks with modern photo book conventions, as the reproductions of the images are folded and tipped in, rather than printed on the book paper. This allows the reproductions to be the same size as the original image without crossing the gutter awkwardly. It also changes the way a reader interacts with the book, as even the minor effort to pull back the folded paper to see the image demands a different type of attention and engagement that is very welcome, much like the intimacy of unfolding a letter. As an added surprise, at the end of the book is a tipped in catalogue of photographs of the original boxes within which the antique papers Rossiter used were stored.


In keeping with a book of photo-images made with very specific materials, Expired Paper shows a high level of attention to material. The embossed text on the dust jacket is a subtle touch, and the three types of paper within the book — a thinner paper for the introductory text by Leah Ollman, a thick, substantial paper that takes ink well for the images, and finally, light gray paper for Rossiter’s closing essay — come together to make a true art object that amplifies the images within. — David Ondrik

Purchase Book

DAVID ONDRIK is an artist working with light sensitive media. He has an MFA from Indiana University and is currently a visiting assistant professor of photography at IU. His website is  https://davidondrik.com/.

photo-eye Gallery Winter Group Show: Michael Kenna photo-eye Gallery's Winter Group Show features 5 recent works by Michael Kenna, including 4 previously unpublished at photo-eye.

Installation view of Michael Kenna's Abruzzo prints in the Winter Group Show

A pair of snow-covered railroad tracks, 12 skeletal beach umbrellas, the ruins of a 13th-century farm – each of Michael Kenna's images in the Winter Group Show serve to show human being's relationship with our environment over time. Each scene's subdued atmosphere, dynamic construction, and vacant silence prompts a moment of reverence and reflection from the viewer.

photo-eye Galley was excited to open the 2018 Winter Group Show last weekend during the Railyard Arts District's Last Friday Art Walk. Among the six artists on view, we are proud to feature 5 recent works by Michael Kenna from the Abruzzo region in southern Italy. Kenna's five 8x8" black-and-white images are indicative of his signature minimalist style and desire to commune with a place rather than capture it.




Five Trees, Pescara, Abruzzo, Italy, 2016
Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 25, $3000
Santa Maria del Monte, Campo Imperatore, Abruzzo, Italy, 2016
Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 25, $3000 
Thirteen Beach Umbrellas, Montesilvano, Abruzzo, Italy, 2016,
Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 25, $3000 
Twelve Beach Structures, Montesilvano, Abruzzo, Italy, 2016,
Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 25, $3000
Railway Lines in Snow, Quarto Santa Chiara, Palena, Abruzzo, Italy, 2016,
Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 25, $3000
 
All five toned silver gelatin prints were hand-made by Kenna in his studio and presented here in 16x20" mats. Prices are current at the time this post was published by may change as the editions sell. Contact the gallery for current prices.

For more information on Michael Kenna, and to purchase prints from the Winter Group Show, please contact Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com.


Nazraeli Press recently released Abruzzo a monograph of Michael Kenna's images from the southern Italian region featuring 65 duotone illustrations and an introduction by Vincenzo de Pompeis.


If you are interested in Michael Kenna, Light & Land's Graeme Green published this outstanding interview with the Artist on January 2nd. Their conversation covers Kenna's approach to image making as well as his flirtation with the plastic Holga camera.

» Pre-Order Kenna's HOLGA Book