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Interview Alexandra Huddleston on East or West and Self-Publishing photo-eye's Melanie McWhorter talks to Alexandra Huddleston about her newest self-published book East or West and the process and challenges of self-publishing.

East or West: A Walking Journal Along Shikoku’s 88 Temple Pilgrimage
by Alexandra Huddleston. Kyoudai Press,  2014.
 
Alexandra Huddleston recently released her third self-published book titled East or West: A Walking Journal Along Shikoku’s 88 Temple Pilgrimage. This paper-wrapped book features a carefully edited selection of her personal journal entries and photographs from an 800-mile pilgrimage across Japan. This book follows 333 Saints: A Life of Scholarship in Timbuktu, a project documenting the ancient tradition of Islamic scholarship in Africa, and a collaborative piece Lost Things with images by the photographer and poems by her brother Robert Huddleston. In this interview, we focus on Huddleston’s three successful Kickstarter crowdfunding campaigns that financed the publications, her decision to make East or West a modest publication and the editing and design choices that Huddleston faced with 333 Saints after the conflict in Mali lead to the destruction of some of the same scholarly texts that she photographed.—Melanie McWhorter

Book Review The Night Climbers of Cambridge By Thomas Maileander Reviewed by Sarah Bradley The internet has made many of us aware of the furtive exploits of urban climbers; we’ve all seen those vertigo-inducing videos shot from the tops of the scaffolding of unfinished skyscrapers, right? (If not, I recommend this one.) As evidenced by a new book from Archive of Modern Conflict, this type of activity has been going on for a while.

The Night Climbers of Cambridge.
By Thomas Maileander. AMC Books, 2014.
 
The Night Climbers of Cambridge
Reviewed by Sarah Bradley

The Night Climbers of Cambridge
By Thomas Maileander
AMC Books, 2014. 88 pp., 64 tritone illustrations and 14 inserts, 10x13¼".


The internet has made many of us aware of the furtive exploits of urban climbers; we’ve all seen those vertigo-inducing videos shot from the tops of the scaffolding of unfinished skyscrapers, right? (If not, I recommend this one.) As evidenced by a new book from Archive of Modern Conflict, this type of activity has been going on for a while. The Night Climbers of Cambridge is a collection of nocturnal images made in the 1930s of men scaling the buildings of Cambridge University — a photographic archive acquired by artist/photographer Thomas Mailaender. The book borrows its title from the volume for which these images were made, first published in 1937, which served as guide to both the art of night climbing and the buildings themselves. The original book has been reprinted several times, each iteration becoming a coveted oddity, leading someone to decide that it’s time for it to resurface. The most recent reprint was in 2013. For those interested, it’s a fun read. Written under the pseudonym Whipplesnaith, it’s composed in an easy helpful manner, filled with precise instructions guiding the would-be climber handhold to foothold, punctuated with a dry, at times melancholy, humor. You’ll find most of the images in the AMC book in the original, but in Whipplesnaith’s document, they are merely photographic examples. Reproduced full bleed in the pages of the AMC book, the photographs are given room to exist on their own, revealing a distinct quality.

photo-eye Gallery Opening Friday at photo-eye Gallery: Mitch Dobrowner Still Earth | Storms photo-eye Gallery is pleased to announce Still Earth, an exhibition of black & white landscape photographs by Mitch Dobrowner. The opening and artist reception will take place on November 21st, 2014 from 5-7 pm. In anticipation of Dobrowner’s visit to Santa Fe, photo-eye's Anne Kelly has asked him about the inspiration behind his new images from Canyonlands National Park.

Monument Valley, 2014 — Mitch Dobowner

We are thrilled to announce that an exhibition of photographs by Mitch Dobrowner, Still Earth | Storms, opens this Friday at photo-eye Gallery. This exhibition debuts a selection of new landscapes recently made in Canyonlands National Park and a selection of new storm images. The new works from Canyonlands depict a still, vast and isolated — almost alien — landscape, with the same power as his turbulent storm-scapes. In anticipation of Dobrowner’s visit to Santa Fe, I've asked him about the inspiration behind his new images. We hope to see you at the artist reception, this Friday night from 5-7 pm. —Anne Kelly

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Alan Rapp Senior editor of The Monacelli Press Alan Rapp selects Shooting Space edit by Elias Redstone as Book of the Week.
Shooting Space edited by Elias Redstone.
Phaidon, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from senior editor of The Monacelli Press Alan Rapp who has selected Shooting Space edited by Elias Redstone published by Phaidon.

Book Review North Philadelphia By Daniel Traub Reviewed by Adam Bell Philadelphia is an underrated city. Eclipsed by its neighbors to the north and south, New York and Washington, D.C, Philadelphia is often unjustly dismissed. Having grown up in the suburbs of Philadelphia, I’ve always loved the city and regard its diverse conglomerate of neighborhoods with great affection.


North Philadelphia. By Daniel Traub.
Kehrer Verlag, 2014.
North Philadelphia
Reviewed by Adam Bell

North Philadelphia
By Daniel Traub
Kehrer Verlag, Heidelberg, 2014. 124 pp., 50 color illustrations, 11¾x9½".


Philadelphia is an underrated city. Eclipsed by its neighbors to the north and south, New York and Washington, D.C, Philadelphia is often unjustly dismissed. Having grown up in the suburbs of Philadelphia, I’ve always loved the city and regard its diverse conglomerate of neighborhoods with great affection. For as long as I lived in the area, from the late 70s to late 90s, North Philadelphia was best known for its crime and poverty, a stereotype that held some truth, but also masked its complex social, cultural, and economic diversity and history. Like many US cities, Philadelphia is deeply segregated, and economic decline, which began in the 50s and picked up greatly in the 70s and 80s, hit the largely African-American and Hispanic community of North Philadelphia especially hard. Like any large urban area, North Philadelphia defies pat stereotypes and demands closer scrutiny. Weaving together multiple subjects — rehabilitated and abandoned lots, portraits, Chinese restaurants, stately churches, and neglected buildings — Daniel Traub’s North Philadelphia is not only a portrait of this often misunderstood neighborhood, but it is also a deeply personal exploration of a community Traub has long known and loved.

Nudes/Human Form Newsletter Nudes/Human Form Newsletter Vol. 8 photo-eye's Nudes/Human Form Newsletter features books that explore the human form in a variety of ways. Today we feature books from Carlo Mollino, John K., Lisa Kereszi and Karl De Haan.
photo-eye's Nudes/Human Form Newsletter features books that explore the human form in a variety of ways. Past editions can be found here.

Polaroids (Second Edition)
By Carlo Mollino

"Sometime around 1960, Carlo Mollino began to seek out women-mostly dancers-in his native Turin, inviting them to his villa for late-night modeling sessions. The models would pose against extraordinary backdrops, designed by Mollino, in clothing, wigs and accessories that he had carefully selected. Finally, having printed the Polaroids, Mollino would painstakingly amend them with an extremely fine brush, to attain his idealized vision of the female form. The pictures, which totaled around 1,200, remained a secret until after his death, in 1973. Only a few were ever publically shown, until the acclaimed first edition of this volume was published by James Crump in 2002."

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photo-eye Gallery Opening Friday Nov. 21st: Mitch Dobrowner - Still Earth | Storms photo-eye Gallery is pleased to announce Still Earth | Storms, an exhibition of black & white landscape photographs by Mitch Dobrowner. The opening and artist reception will take place on November 21st, 2014 from 5-7 pm.

Doll House, 2014 and Landspout, 2014 -- Mitch Dobrowner

Opening Friday, November 21st from 5-7pm
photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe St, Santa Fe
Exhibition runs through January 10th, 2015


Book Review Sight Seeing By Paul McDonough Reviewed by Blake Andrews You can take the street photographer out of the city, but can you take the city out of the street photographer? That's the question posed by Paul McDonough's recent book Sight Seeing. To date McDonough's reputation has rested largely on urban work. His classic black and white candids of 1970s New York pedestrians fall firmly in the street photography tradition.

Sight Seeing. By Paul McDonough.
Sasha Wolf Gallery, 2014.
 
Sight Seeing
Reviewed by Blake Andrews

Sight Seeing
By Paul McDonough
Sasha Wolf Gallery, 2014. 48 pp., 20 duotone illustrations, 9¾x8¼".


You can take the street photographer out of the city, but can you take the city out of the street photographer?

That's the question posed by Paul McDonough's recent book Sight Seeing. To date McDonough's reputation has rested largely on urban work. His classic black and white candids of 1970s New York pedestrians fall firmly in the street photography tradition. Many of these were collected in 2010's knockout monograph New York Photographs 1968-1978, which established him somewhat belatedly as a leading practitioner of the craft.

Interview Daniel Shea on Blisner, Il Lucas Foglia talks to fellow photographer and friend Daniel Shea about making pictures and Shea's recent publication Blisner, Il.

Blisner, Il. By Daniel Shea.
fourteen-nineteen, 2014.
 
Turning the pages of Daniel Shea’s Blisner, Il,  I think about the way a curve in a road is calculated so we can turn the wheel once and stay on course, the way every building is engineered to support itself. I think about how I take these things for granted.

Blisner, Il is a subtly dramatic book set in Illinois. Shea uses photographs from small towns to story a fictional small town that uses its history as a lifeline, creating a myth of itself and the industry that once made it. The photographs, often juxtaposed or narratively sequenced, portray the kind of mundane details that we ignore in the places we live, and then look back on with nostalgia: statues, objects, insects, birds, and buildings; people pictured in murals, or occasionally living, pausing and looking off somewhere.

If one person believes in a god that no one else believes in, they are usually crazy. If a hundred people believe in that god, they are a cult. If a million people believe in that god, they have a religion. Whether or not the this small town is real, whether or not it is holy, I think this is a book worth believing in.

Below is a recent conversation between Shea and I that I recorded and transcribed, part of an ongoing dialogue that we started in 2010.—Lucas Foglia

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Baptiste Lignel Photographer Baptiste Lignel selects The Epilogue by Laia Abril as Book of the Week (with an additional statement from Abril).
The Epilogue by Laia Abril
Dewi Lewis Publishing, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from photographer and publisher Baptiste Lignel who has selected The Epilogue by Laia Abril from Dewi Lewi Publishing. Lignel also asked Abril to make a statement on the creation of the book and project.

Book Review Photoshow Edit by Alessandra Mauro Reviewed by Colin Pantall Since the publication of Fotografia Publica in 2000, there have been a mass of books about photobooks. The Parr and Badger series are the most notable but there have been individual books on the Dutch, German, Swiss, South American and Spanish photobooks to name but a few. But what about the exhibition?

Photoshow. Edited by Alessandra Mauro.
Constrasto, 2014.
Photoshow
Reviewed by Colin Pantall

Photoshow
Edited by Alessandra Mauro
Contrasto, 2014. 272 pp., illustrated, 8x10½".


Since the publication of Fotografia Publica in 2000, there have been a mass of books about photobooks. The Parr and Badger series are the most notable but there have been individual books on the Dutch, German, Swiss, South American and Spanish photobooks to name but a few.

But what about the exhibition? You can find little snippets here and there on the best known exhibitions of the photographic age, but there seems to be no publication dedicated solely to the fabrication and exhibiting of photography.

photo-eye Gallery From the Flat Files: Chris McCaw & David Emitt Adams Materials have meaning. photo-eye's Lucas Shaffer highlights Chris McCaw and David Emitt Adams, who each forge robust and sculptural photographs with entirely unique results.

Chris McCaw,Sunburned GSP #691 (Anza Borrego), 2013

Chris McCaw, Sunburned GSP #687 (Pacific Ocean), 2013
Materials have meaning. This axiom has a long and storied history among photographers, and has prompted countless discussions about the implications of paper type, printer brand, or chemical developer upon image outcome and overall viewer perception. I myself have clear memories from my own photographic education justifying paper and developer combinations to instructors while dissecting the subtle nuances of print tone and patina amidst classmates. This week, however, I’d like to showcase two Gallery artists whose implement of photographic materials transcends those more common usages. Chris McCaw and David Emitt Adams forge robust and sculptural photographs with entirely unique results.

Perhaps photographer Chris McCaw doesn’t need an introduction. His ongoing project Sunburn has caught fire in recent years, and McCaw’s work exhibits internationally, including: the Getty museum in LA, the Somerset House Trust in London, and right here at photo-eye Gallery in the 2012 exhibition Solar. Using giant homemade large format cameras, McCaw exposes antique and obsolete silver gelatin enlarging paper to direct sunlight for up to twenty-four hours. The effect is incredible. Over the duration of the extended exposure the paper solarizes, forming a visual positive, and the sun literally burns a hole in its jagged arching wake. These scenes are a dark and primordial expression of time, entropy, and the cyclical process of creation and destruction. Currently photo-eye Gallery has five of these one of a kind images on hand.

Book Review Fractal State of Being By Sara Skorgan Teigen Reviewed by Sarah Bradley About ten years ago I was given one of the best birthday gifts I’ve ever received. I’d spent a lot of time with that friend over the previous year, us sitting across tables from each other, him doodling in his small moleskine, me jotting illegibly in mine. I’d peer across cups of coffee and dirty plates to see what he was drawing in that little sketchbook; my admiration was often received with an eye roll.

Fractal State of Being. By Sara Skorgan Teigen.
Journal Publishers, 2014.
 
Fractal State of Being
Reviewed by Sarah Bradley

Fractal State of Being
By Sara Skorgan Teigen.
Journal Publishers, 2014. 48 pp., 55 color illustrations, 8¼x11½".


About ten years ago I was given one of the best birthday gifts I’ve ever received. I’d spent a lot of time with that friend over the previous year, us sitting across tables from each other, him doodling in his small moleskine, me jotting illegibly in mine. I’d peer across cups of coffee and dirty plates to see what he was drawing in that little sketchbook; my admiration was often received with an eye roll.

Several months after my birthday he sat across from me again, familiarly consumed in that black book, this time drawing with silver pen on the cover. He answered me, half-distracted as usual, occasionally looking up to laugh or make a statement, and when he was finished, he blew on the ink to dry it and handed me the book. “Happy Birthday,” he said. On the spine he’d written “For Sarah,” and on the endpaper above a cartoon drawing of himself it said, “Because I’ve owed you some shitting drawings for a long time.”

photo-eye Gallery Interview & Portfolio: Alejandro Cartagena's Carpoolers We are thrilled to have a selection of images from Alejandro Cartagena's Carpoolers series hanging in the photo-eye Bookstore + Project Space in Santa Fe with an opening Friday November 7th from 5-7pm. photo-eye's Melanie McWhorter asked Cartagena about the origin of the series and its popularity and the creation of the Carpoolers book.
Carpoolers #24, Carpoolers #37 and Carpoolers #40  Alejandro Cartagena

We are thrilled to have a selection of images from Alejandro Cartagena's Carpoolers series hanging in the photo-eye Bookstore + Project Space in Santa Fe with an opening Friday November 7th from 5-7pm. The work is also being released in an online portfolio on the Photographer's Showcase, which can be viewed here.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Donald Weber Photographer Donald Weber selects Almost There by Aleix Plademunt as Book of the Week.
Almost There by Aleix Plademunt
MACK, 2013.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from photographer Donald Weber who has selected Almost There by Aleix Plademunt published by MACK.