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photo-eye Gallery Gallery Favorites: Rendezvous with Light David H. Gibson and Chaco Terada’s exhibition Rendezvous with Light creates a tranquil setting where natural imagery serves to address questions of time, thought, permanence, and origin. In this month’s Gallery Favorites segment, we select images from both Gibson and Terada that personally resonate with each of us.

David H. Gibson and Chaco Terada’s exhibition Rendezvous with Light creates a tranquil setting where natural imagery serves to address questions of time, thought, permanence, and origin.  In this month’s Gallery Favorites segment, we select images from both Gibson and Terada that personally resonate with each of us.

We hope you enjoy viewing our selected works from the Rendezvous with Light and please reach out if you have questions about one of the featured prints — Rendezvous with Light remains on view at photo-eye Gallery through December 30th.
– Anne, Lucas, and Savannah 

Anne Kelly

Sunrise Sequence, December 24, 2016, Texas Gulf Coast, Archival Pigment Ink, 116x27" Image, Edition of 3, $8000
© David H. Gibson
One of the many things that I admire about David H. Gibson is his attention to craftsmanship.  Not only does David make stunning prints, but objects as well. For years David has been creating handmade LTD books – and recently, for our exhibition,  a 116x27” Japanese inspired scroll.  This free flowing paper scroll spans a half an hour of time and displays a quite x-mas eve morning spent on the Texas Gulf Coast watching the sunrise - which never gets old.


Garden Without Spacetime F2, 2017, Sumi Ink and 
Pigment Ink on Silk, 10x7" Image, $1200 
© Chaco Terada
Garden Without Spacetime F1, 2017, Sumi Ink and 
Pigment Ink on Silk, 10x7" Image, $1200 
© Chaco Terada

When experiencing Chaco Terada’s work I enjoy getting lost between the layers of silk that make up the compositions. The journey is quiet and contemplative – like a poem. Ever since I was a small child I have been fascinated with fish, so I can’t help but love that in this suite of images a white koi participates in the meditation. The individual images are very strong on their own, but this pair makes a lovely diptych!

Anne Kelly, Gallery Director
anne@photoeye.com
505-988-5152 x 121

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Lucas Shaffer

Sunrise, August 26, 8:26 AM, Eagle Nest Lake, NM, Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 14x4" Image, Edition of 25, $400
© David H. Gibson

I adore Sunrise, August 26 by David Gibson for its balance, richness, and serenity. Absent of land or horizon, the scene is a paradox. It feels both dense and thick while remaining ungrounded, pinned by a pair of twin suns and anchored only by a wreath of reeds.

There, the Opening 3, 2017, Sumi Ink and Pigment Ink on Silk, 10x7" Image, $1200, © Chaco Terada 
I love how Chaco Terada uses layers in her work to create an experience and cultivate meaning. In There, the Opening 3, Terada lays her gorgeous calligraphic text atop a pair of transparent images literally giving the viewer three distinct perspectives to consider within a single work. For me, the effect is powerful and mesmerizing, as if Terada has manifested a visual representation of a personal rumination.

Lucas Shaffer, Gallery Associate
lucas@photoeye.com
505-988-5152 x114

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Savannah Sakry

Water Plant Lace, Colorado Rocky Mountains, CO, Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 5x13" Image, Edition of 25, $400
Water Plant Lace, Colorado Rocky Mountains by David H. Gibson is a timeless slice of heaven. Reminiscent of Monet’s “Water Lilies”, this gorgeous silver print is the perfect backdrop for any Romantic. The image is slightly abstract, offers lush texture, and also serves as a reminder to take a closer look to appreciate nature’s profound beauty.

Introspection H 2, Chaco Terada, Sumi Ink and Pigment Ink on Silk, 12x8" Image, $1500
When spending a few moments with this exquisite Chaco Terada photograph on silk, I find peace as I stare into a glimpse of the artist’s own quiet introspection, as the title suggests. While I join her on the journey of looking inward, I can feel the waves gently rocking back and forth and imagine their sound to be something like a lullaby.

Savannah Sakry, Gallery Associate
savannah@photoeye.com
505-988-5152 x115

» Inquire









For more information, and to purchase prints, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff
gallery@photoeye.com, 505-988-5152 x202

Book of the Week Book of the Week: France Is a Feast – A Pick by Laura M. André Laura M. André selects France Is a Feast, with photographs by Paul Child, as Book of the Week.
France Is a Feast
Photographs by Paul Child Thames & Hudson, 2017.

Laura M. André selects France Is a Feast: The Photographic Journey of Paul and Julia Child as Book of the Week.

Growing up in the 1970s, I remember fondly watching Julia Child's television shows. As a ten-year-old with zero interest in French cooking, I found both current episodes and black-and-white re-runs surprisingly entertaining. The show was all about Julia herself, by then a grandmotherly dame whose sense of humor in the face of her sometimes botched kitchen antics embodied an endearing je-m'en-foutisme (couldn't-care-less attitude).

Like many others in my generation, I became reacquainted with Julia Child — and her cultural importance — through her posthumously published memoir,  My Life in France, and its popular film adaptation, Julie & Julia, starring Meryl Streep as Julia and Jeffrey Tambor as her husband, Paul. So naturally, I was excited to learn about France Is a Feast, the new photobook from Thames & Hudson that presents, for the first time, 225 of Paul Child's photographs alongside a narrative of the couple's time in France (by their great-nephew Alex Prud'homme and longtime family friend Katie Pratt).

Although I was primed to find the effort charming, I wasn't fully prepared for Paul Child's photographs to knock me out the way they did. Here, in image after image, Child's work displays the best qualities of the most iconic post-World War II French humanist photographs: Cartier-Bresson's composition; Robert Doisneau's wit; Willy Ronis' lighting; and the proud, passionate francophilia they all shared. The book intersperses these kinds of images with Paul's more informal snapshots of Julia. Here, the stooped, grandmotherly woman many of us knew only from television appears as a young, leggy, and captivating woman, living life to the fullest and savoring every moment.

When I was in graduate school in the 1990s, this kind of postwar photography often came under scrutiny because it failed to address — and, more importantly, it disguised — very real contemporary issues of French colonialism, racism, and economic and sexual inequalities. In that world, images like Paul Child's were evidence of privileged insouciance about those societal problems, and nostalgia — a longing for a past that never was — for an uncomplicated sense of social and cultural entitlement. I always felt like it was a guilty pleasure to admire those kinds of images.

Now, I'm older and less judgmental. And, this book shares that Paul grew up on the brink of poverty after his father died. His mother made ends meet by singing in friends' living rooms, as her children accompanied her on musical instruments. He was forced to drop out of Columbia University after one year, when money for his education ran out. Paul and Julia met abroad as foreign service employees.

From the distance of 2017, with all that has happened and is happening in our world, I see these images through at least two lenses. The critical lens is still there, but it shares equal space with an empathetic one through which I see the photographs simply as evidence of a real existence that two particular individuals lived in a certain place and time that's forever gone. It's like looking at snapshots of my grandparents when they were young. And while, at one point in the not-so-distant past, I could still claim a bit of a hold on the places and times in those old family photos, the decades since have rendered much of them unreachable anymore.

Now, Paul Child's seductive and gorgeous mid-20th-century photographs might as well be from 1900, or even the 19th century; so distant the places, times, and sensibilities they depict are to our own. They have become historical documents, and as such, have earned from me a new level of well-deserved respect. Bon appetit!


France Is a Feast: The Photographic Journey of Paul and Julia Child. Photographs by Paul Child. Text by Alex Prud'homme and Katie Pratt. Thames & Hudson, 2017.

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France Is a FeastPhotographs by Paul Child. Thames & Hudson, 2017

France Is a FeastPhotographs by Paul ChildThames & Hudson, 2017.


Laura M. André received her PhD in art history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and taught photo history at the University of New Mexico before leaving academia to work with photobooks. She is the manager of photo-eye's book division.

photo-eye Gallery The gift of photography – for under $1000 photo-eye Gallery staff shares a selection of their favorite prints by represented and showcase artists under $1000.

Spider Chrysanthemum, Archival Pigment Ink on Glass, 24kt Gold Leaf, 4x4" Image, Framed, $950
© Kate Breakey

As the year winds down and the holiday season approaches we have been reflecting and revisiting images that have stuck with us over the years. Because we are lucky enough to be immersed in photography every day, our list of favorites is naturally rather extensive and in an attempt to prune the list down so that every image gets the attention it deserves we are focusing on photographs that are $1000 or less – prints that could be a great gift for others OR for yourself!  As we mentioned earlier this year in our Collecting Guide, setting a limit, like a budget or a genre, is an excellent way to center in on purchasing the right piece.

If any of the images speak to you, please reach out to us, we would love to tell you more about the images and the artists.

Anne, Lucas, and Savannah

Tom Chambers
Edge of a Dream
Archival Pigment Print
14x14" Image
Edition of 20
$950 

Laurie Tümer
Cloud No. 0001
Archival Pigment Print
5x3" Image
Edition of 10
$500


Douglas Levere
Snowflake 2014.02.16.024
Archival Pigment Print
12x12" Image
Edition of 10
$500


Karl Blossfeldt
Plate 111 - Campanula alliarifolia, Spurred Bellflower
Photogravure
10x8" Image
$285


Amy Friend
It Could Be Anywhere
Archival Pigment Print
17x18" Image
Edition of 10
$695


James Pitts
Clover Flower, 1994
Platinum/Palladium Print
11x8" Image
Edition of 50
$750



Zoë Zimmerman
Origin, 2007
Albumen Print
10x8" Image
Edition of 24
$900


David H. Gibson
Grasses and Reflections, Eagle Nest Lake, New Mexico
Gelatin-Silver Print
8x23" Image
Edition of 48
$800


Limited Edition of A Clearing by represented artist Raymond Meeks – Hardcover w/ Slipcase & Artist Made Print
Silver Gelatin Print included in the limited edition of A Clearing

Raymond Meeks
A Clearing
Limited Edition Hardcover Monograph with Silver Gelatin Print
Nazraeli Press, Tucson, 2008. 48 pp., 34 duotone plates
12x17"

The limited edition of A Clearing comes with a gelatin silver print (approximately the size of the hardcover book) housed in a clam-shell box in an edition of 25.

$675




Rachel Phillips
Hoffeld Lake House
Pigment Transfer to Antique Envelope
4.5x6" Image
$650

http://www.photoeye.com/gallery/forms2/index.cfm?image=1&id=68149&imagePosition=1&Door=1&Portfolio=Portfolio10&Gallery=1&Page=#LBimage034
Pentti Sammallahti
Western Cape, South Africa, 2002
Gelatin-Silver Print
2.8x3.8" Image
$800



Steve Fitch
Wakefield, Michigan, May, 1989
Archival Pigment Print
12x12" Image
$450


Jo Whaley
Papilionidae, 2010
Pigment Ink Photograph
8x10" Image
Edition of 10
$900






For more information, and to purchase prints, please contact Gallery Staff at 
505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com





photo-eye Gallery Handmade Artist Books by David Gibson photo-eye Gallery's current exhibition Rendezvous with Light prominently features work by Dallas-based landscape photographer David H. Gibson – including a number of his exquisite handmade artist books.
David H. Gibson – Sunrise Sequence August 27, 8:37 AM Eagle Nest Lake, NM, 2016 
photo-eye Gallery's current exhibition Rendezvous with Light prominently features work by Dallas-based landscape photographer David H. Gibson – including a number of his exquisite handmade artist books. Gibson's artistic practice often revolves around how light and atmosphere render an environment over time employing the camera to permanently record these ephemeral effects in sequence. David's process truly shines in book form where a full scene can be viewed in order at an intimate distance, lending a sense of enchantment to something as common as a sunrise.

Gibson is a consummate craftsman. Each book is painstakingly constructed by hand from the gorgeous archival materials such as 100% cotton rag paper, Mohair bookbinding fabric, and each plate is printed to gallery standards. The artist books are available in Limited Editions.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Christian Michael Filardo Christian Michael Filardo selects The Model, by Tørbjorn Rødland, as Book of the Week.
The Model
By Tørbjorn Rødland Mack, 2017.

Christian Michael Filardo selects The Model, by Tørbjorn Rødland, from Mack, as Book of the Week.

While watching a video interview about Tørbjorn Rødland’s new show, The Touch That Made You, at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, I was able to understand the way in which he works a little bit better. He discusses an inner catalogue of photographic memories, tropes in photography, and the viewer-photograph relationship. After hearing Rødland speak for a minute it becomes clear that his photography will push all the boundaries and buttons. He does just that in his new monograph The Model out now from Mack.

Essentially, The Model is a book in which Rødland photographs Polish model Małgosia Bela over and over again. She appears in ads in the city, on the covers of magazines, on a DVD case, behind bars, painting in a park, in front of a ship with the word Trollfjord painted neatly on it. At first glance this book is easily forgettable; however with more time one begins to recognize the cheeky nature in which Rødland is making art world commentary.

Many photographers follow an individual and photograph them. So much so that it has become a trope within the medium. We know Tiny by Mary Ellen Mark, Tom by Paul Kranzler, Man Next Door by Rob Hornstra, Conor Donlon by Wolfgang Tillmans, the list goes on and on. However, what sets Rødland’s book apart from all of these books is his attitude and attention towards the trope itself. Often people follow individuals or communities due to some sort of extreme existence they live or because they have a specific level of intimacy with an individual. While Rødland might be close with Małgosia, she is still, in fact, a supermodel. She’s playful, beautiful, seemingly fun, and omnipresent. Rødland finds her everywhere, so much so that you begin to question why one would photograph Malgosia at all. Her face is on billboards, in shop windows, random magazine pages; she is a vessel for capitalism, lust, and the idea of beauty itself. A few times Rødland even gets meta with his own work, actually photographing his last monograph, Confabulations, while it rests under a DVD, as well as photographing a gallery visitor looking at one of his images of Małgosia.

Ultimately, while this book isn’t a masterwork, it’s still a Rødland title, conceptual, colorful, and visually stimulating. A nice release from Mack worth checking out a fan of the genre of portraiture and beyond. A dissection of an institution that I find wonderfully successful. — Christian Michael Filardo

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The Model, By Tørbjorn Rødland. Mack, 2017

The Model, By Tørbjorn RødlandMack, 2017.


Christian Michael Filardo is a Filipino-American composer and photographer living and working in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He recently had a solo exhibition called Tumbleweed Replica at Current Space in Baltimore, MD and is the current shipping manager at photo-eye bookstore.

photo-eye Gallery A Holiday Collection from photo-eye Gallery To celebrate the holidays, photo-eye Gallery Director Anne Kelly and Associates Lucas Shaffer and Savannah Sakry have hand-selected a collection of works for the season.

To celebrate the holidays, photo-eye Gallery Director Anne Kelly and Associates Lucas Shaffer and Savannah Sakry have hand-selected a collection of works for the season. Comprised of prints by both represented and showcase artists, the 2017 Holiday Collection serves to express the beauty, warmth, and magic that epitomizes this time of year. We here at photo-eye Gallery would also like to express our sincere gratitude to all of you for all of your enthusiasm and support throughout the year, it is truly fulfilling.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Forrest Soper Forrest Soper selects The Martin Parr Coloring Book! by Martin Parr as Book of the Week.
The Martin Parr Coloring Book!
By Martin Parr Aperture, 2017.
Forrest Soper selects The Martin Parr Coloring Book!  by Martin Parr from Aperture as Book of the Week.

“Coloring looks very simple, but, boy, to do it well, it’s very difficult — like photography, it looks so simple but it’s very tough.” — Martin Parr

"I’ve always thought that the coloring book is an under-rated form of expression. All art, regardless of medium, is communicative and cannot exist in a vacuum. As a result, I view all works of art as a conversation between the creator and the viewer. Generally speaking, the more impactful or insightful the conversation is, the more powerful the work of art. Some conversations only speak to a specific audience or demographic, but coloring books have a beautiful unimposing simplicity that allows them to communicate with the young and the old alike.

Enter The Martin Parr Coloring Book!, the latest publication from the prolific photographer. At this point, Parr needs no introduction, as he has quickly become one of the most popular contemporary photographers of this generation. His often-humorous documentations of bizarre slices of culture have amused and fascinated individuals for decades. Now, thanks to the work of artist and book lover, Jane Mount, almost 50 of Parr’s classic images can be engaged with, in coloring book form!

When many people think of a coloring book, they think of something juvenile. Coloring books, to many, are a relatively inexpensive tool used to occupy the youth. However, in recent years, designers have worked diligently to make coloring books that can be enjoyed by adults. Until recently, my favorite ‘adult coloring book’ was Chuck Palahniuk’s Bait: Off-Color Stories for You to Color, an illustrated collection of Palahniuk’s macabre and bizarre short stories. Now, Parr’s publication is unquestionably my new favorite go-to coloring book.

This publication is so well designed, that you can color on every single page. Children will be amused with coloring in bizarre scenes such as a dog with sunglasses, or piles of spam surrounded by beautiful flowers. Adults will gain a deeper understanding of Parr’s composition and humor, as they are forced to spend longer with each image as they take the time to color in every shape.

This is a beautifully designed coloring book. The illustrations range from very simple outlines, so drawings with incredible amounts of detail. Coloring enthusiasts of all levels will be able to find pages that match their skill set. If that was not enough, the book ends with four pages of Martin Parr stickers (one for each of the images found in the book.)

At the end of the day, The Martin Parr Coloring Book! is a book that has the potential to speak to a wide audience. This publication contains every charming aspect of a Parr photobook, but it has the added benefit of being engaging and fun. At the very least, this publication should not be overlooked when looking at the catalog of Parr monographs and is essential for any Martin Parr fan." — Forrest Soper

Purchase Book

The Martin Parr Coloring Book! By Martin Parr Aperture, 2017

The Martin Parr Coloring Book! By Martin Parr Aperture, 2017.



Forrest Soper is a photographer and artist based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico. A graduate of the Santa Fe University of Art and Design, he also has previously worked at Bostick & Sullivan. Forrest is the Editor of photo-eye Blog.
http://forrestsoper.com/


Book Review Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays By Robert Adams Reviewed by Karen Jenkins “Robert Adams’ timely new book, Art Can Help is an invigorating response to a waxing cultural despair over the state of the world and our dubious agency in it. Offered not as a mere balm, this collection of just over two dozen short essays is a quietly powerful argument for what art can and should mean in our lives."
Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays 
By Robert Adams. Yale University Art Gallery, 2017.
 
Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays
Reviewed by Karen Jenkins

Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays.
Text by Robert Adams.
Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, United States, 2017. In English. 92 pp., 34 color illustrations, 5½x8¼x½".

Robert Adams’ timely new book, Art Can Help is an invigorating response to a waxing cultural despair over the state of the world and our dubious agency in it. Offered not as a mere balm, this collection of just over two dozen short essays is a quietly powerful argument for what art can and should mean in our lives. Two opening passages unpack the formative influence of Edward Hopper on Adams’ way of looking at and making art. The texts that follow delve into favorite and affecting photographs around which Adams champions a deeply personal experience with art, one which demands accountability and an intrinsic connection between art and life. The Introduction and Afterword bookend Adams’ lyrical unraveling of art that ‘helps’ with a bald critique of the failings of that art practice that he sees as facile or empty. He writes: “This atrophying away of the genuine article is a misfortune because, in an age of nuclear weapons and overpopulation and global warming, we need more than ever what art used to provide. Somehow we have to recommit to picture making that is serious.”

Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays. By Robert Adams. Yale University Art Gallery, 2017.
Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays. By Robert Adams. Yale University Art Gallery, 2017.

A weighty directive to be sure, but these essays not only deliver; they elucidate and delight. I happily read all 88 pages in one sitting, my shared love of photography and belief in art’s centrality to life burnished anew. With graceful brevity, Adams offers narratives that are at once sharply focused on the contents within each frame and that send the reader off on trails of expansive analogy to literature, poetry and music. Many reflect his abiding commitment to the landscape and how art can challenge our incursions and insults, as well as sustain our experience of beauty and the sublime. The “wonderful gloom” of Wayne Gudmundson’s photograph of abandoned grain elevators is balanced for Adams by a flight of birds and a tree’s wing-like boughs, together “a melodic answer to the bass line of the deserted buildings with their static darkness.” In discussing Eric Paddock’s photograph of a distant railroad crossing in a vast Colorado plain, Adams speaks to emptiness and solitude, conjuring both the views once commemorated in “quietly local postcards” as well as poet William Stafford’s take on such landscapes conjuring “space, and the hurt of space after the others are gone.”

Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays. By Robert Adams. Yale University Art Gallery, 2017.
Art Can Help: New and Selected Essays. By Robert Adams. Yale University Art Gallery, 2017.

Most stirring for me were those passages that foreground art’s capacity to re-engage us in life, as active and accountable participants, as well as those that lauded a life devoted to its creation. He sees the empathy and culpability in Garry Winogrand’s photograph, shot through a windshield, of a calf stumbling between two opposing cars on a western road, arguing that his “photograph keeps us alive, overruling all assurances from behaviorists that we are never guilty.” In ten short paragraphs illustrated by two photographs from Judith Joy Ross’s Portraits of the Hazleton Public Schools, Adams folds us into his unforgettable relationship with these works, from the notion of a shared experience of pain to a hope for the future, crafted on both aesthetic rigor and visual and narrative delights. When he writes, “This is the sort of thing that is worth a life,” we are powerless to disagree. It is one of Adams’ many gifts that a lifetime of serious attention to looking at art and making photographs has yielded these captivating, important takes on what 35 odd pictures mean to him. Whether we share his wonder with these views, or have our own sacred fold, he wins the day not with heavy-handed insistence, but with an understated authority encompassing intelligence, wonderment and a devotion to looking carefully and owning what he sees. — Karen Jenkins

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KAREN JENKINS earned a Master's degree in Art History, specializing in the History of Photography from the University of Arizona. She has held curatorial positions at the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, AZ and the Demuth Museum in Lancaster, PA. Most recently she helped to debut a new arts project, Art in the Open Philadelphia, that challenges contemporary artists to reimagine the tradition of creating works of art en plein air for the 21st century.


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photo-eye Gallery NEW Portfolio: Rendezvous with Light – David H. Gibson & Chaco Terada photo-eye Gallery is excited to release a new portfolio Rendezvous with Light featuring work from represented artists David H. Gibson and Chaco Terada's two-person-show of the same name opening this Friday, November 17th.

photo-eye Gallery is excited to release a new portfolio, Rendezvous with Light, featuring work from represented artists David H. Gibson and Chaco Terada's two-person-show of the same name opening this Friday, November 17th. With over 35 works on view, the exhibition includes dual layer silk prints by Chaco Terada as well as silver gelatin prints, pigment ink prints, and handmade artist books by David H. Gibson. Rendezvous with Light juxtaposes Gibson and Terada's images and focuses on themes such as nature, time, origin, and of course – light. While the artists often work closely together they maintain separate practice and express their ideas uniquely.




photo-eye will be hosting an Artist Reception for Gibson and Terada on Friday, November 17th from 5–7pm, Rendezvous with Light will be on view through December 30th.

Chaco Terada - Light Banquet, 2017, Sumi Ink and Pigment Ink on Silk 10x7" Image, $1200 •

David H. Gibson – Lotus Stems and Cloud Reflections, Texas Gulf Coast, 1998,
Toned Gelatin-Silver Print, 9.5x13" Image, Edition of 45, $1200 


David H. Gibson – Backlighted Moss, Mill Pond, Caddo Lake Texas
Toned Gelatin-Silver Print 9.3x5.5" Image, Edition of 50, $400 


Chaco Terada - There, the Opening 3, 2017 Sumi Ink and Pigment Ink on Silk 10x7" Image, $1200 


Chaco Terada - Garden Without Spacetime F1, 2017 Sumi Ink and Pigment Ink on Silk 10x7" Image, $1200 


David H. Gibson - Cypress Island, Village Creek, Texas, 1987 Gelatin-Silver Print 6x6" Image, Edition of 50, $600 



Works by David H. Gibson are available in Limited Editions and prices may change as the edition sells. Works by Chaco Terada are UNIQUE due to her technique, please inquire as to their current availability. All works above were available at the listed price at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase prints, please contact Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com.