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Books 2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day Six Day 6 of our 14-day series featuring the Favorite Photobooks of 2018! This year we asked a number of luminaries from the photobook world to select their favorite photobook of the year. The list will continue to grow over the next two weeks, so check back each day for a new group of favorite books!"
https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/index.cfm


2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day 6

This year we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of our renowned listing of the year's best photobooks. To mark this milestone, we've decided to do something a bit different. We've asked 88 internationally recognized luminaries from the photobook world to choose their favorite photobook of the year. Their favorite book could be unforgettable for any number of reasons but the chosen books affected our selectors on a very personal level. These books led each of our contributors to conclude, "If there's one book not to miss this year, it would be this!"

Each day for the following two weeks we will publish additional titles selected by our distinguished group of photobook lovers. Subscribe to PhotoBookDaily to get our email announcements in advance!

Check back daily to see a new group of favorite books!



Ed Templeton's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/best-books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Ed&Lastname=Templeton
Youth Unemployment
Photographs by Tish Murtha

"I love picking up a book with a name I’ve never heard of and being blown away. Youth Unemployment was it this year, especially after hearing it was a posthumous book shepherded into being by Tish Murtha’s daughter."




Douglas Stockdale's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/best-books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Douglas&Lastname=Stockdale
On Abortion
Photographs by Laia Abril

"Abril and Pez have not shied from this thorny inter-continental and multilayered cultural, political and religious land-mine like the subject of Abortion. They provide ample evidence of how over the years many women have suffered extensively due to their reproductive capabilities."




Joshua McFadden's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/best-books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Joshua&Lastname=McFadden
Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness
Photographs by Zanele Muholi

"In this beautiful monograph, Muholi uses the self-portrait a vehicle for social change while demonstrating a vulnerability that is inspiring. Adorned with found objects, Muholi presents strong themes of freedom from bondage, inequality, and injustice. This book is a must-have, and you should buy it immediately."




Renate Aller's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/best-books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Renate&Lastname=Aller
Desert
Photographs and text by Jungjin Lee

"Jungjin Lee’s publication Desert offers our eyes a tactile experience. She gives us permission to trace the surface texture in an intimate close up and to get lost in a space devoid of structure and time. The book perfectly translates the experience of viewing her large-scale installations on handmade paper"




S. Billie Mandle's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/best-books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=S.%20Billie&Lastname=Mandle
How We See: Photobooks by Women
Photographs by Jo Ann Walters

"Looking through Wood River Blue Pool is slightly painful. Some of the portraits feel too intimate — as if Jo Ann Walters had captured neighbors or cousins, maybe myself. Laura Wexler’s essay and Emma Kemp’s companion book give a powerful context: voicing the moral pain held in and around the pictures and our lives."




Emily Sheffer's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/best-books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Emily&Lastname=Sheffer
The Splitting of the Chrysalis and the Slow Unfolding of the Wings
Photographs by Yorgos Yatromanolakis

"The allegorical imagery feels like a stumbling fever dream through a familiar place. The size and length of the book is just right, as are the carefully chosen details on the hardcover design. It’s rare that I find a book that feels so complete within itself — as if it needs to live only in this form."





Book Of The Week Deana Lawson Photographs by Deana Lawson Reviewed by Blake Andrews Since the early eighties, Gerry Johansson has made quiet pictures of quiet places, often lying in the shadows of industrial decline. For American Winter, Johansson travelled through semi-deserted towns in Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado, finding as much beauty as there was misery in landscapes cloaked in snow
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=AP647
Deana Lawson. By Deana Lawson.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=AP647
Deana Lawson
Photographs by Deana Lawson

Aperture, New York, 2018.
104 pp., 40 color and duotone illustrations, 11x13¾".

Deana Lawson's Aperture monograph hit me like a Mack Truck. Starting with the very first photo — a barely dressed couple locked in a sultry embrace, the woman leering askance near their sleeping infant. It's a disquieting image, and just an inkling of what's to come. A flood of theatrical and bewitching portraits follows, or what seems a flood anyway. In reality, the book only has 40 photos. But they feel like a multitude. This is Lawson's first monograph, after all, and it comes at age 39, more than a decade into her career. Bookwise, she's been bottled up. So it's no surprise her debut packs a wallop. This huge book pulls out all the stops, with marbled endpapers, maroon gilded edges, and exhibition-quality reproductions. But of course, it's the photos which are the core.

Lawson's subject matter varies but certain motifs abound. Most of her models are nude. They're generally centered in the frame and set in messy domestic spaces, from which they glare back at the camera. Are they bored? Irritated? Proud? Defiant? It's hard to say. Indeed, the magic of these photos lies in their ambiguity. One shows a shirtless man holding a half-cocked rifle. In another, a naked woman floats in erect yoga pose over a tiger rug. There's a man with a large dental implement matching his gold chains, a bloody pig's head worn as a hat, a nude couple crisscrossed under Mickey Mouse. These photos aren't afraid to air dirty laundry, sometimes literally. But what exactly is going on here?

Part of what makes Lawson's portraits unsettling is that they give the effect of documentary exposures, when instead they're carefully choreographed. Lawson finds her models in various locales —"from lower-class or working-class backgrounds"— locates sets, then combines her subject matter in ways that look beguilingly real and regal. "Her people seem to occupy a higher plane," writes Zadie Smith in the opening essay. You can see strains of other strong portraitists in Lawson's direct style —Arbus, Weems, and Bruce Wrighton, to name a few. All share a certain rugged brutalism. But Lawson's voice is hers. In fact, she's found what all photographers seek: Immediately recognizable authorship.

Did I mention that Lawson and all of her subjects are black? Oh yes, the racial component. I'm a white man, and I'm going to speculate that most of Lawson's audience is also white. Perhaps you are too? So the book's inherent dynamic —caucasian viewers consuming black subjects— is weighted with the troublesome baggage of the white gaze. As John Edwin Mason recently tweeted, "white people like to look at photos of black people. No question. There's a seemingly insatiable demand for photos of black folks."

Lawson is unquestionably aware of this dynamic. Perhaps she's leveraged it to advantage by amplifying the exoticism of her subjects? Her photos dance around racial stereotypes, depicting her subjects as primitive, fierce, lascivious, and gauche. Could whitey make these photos? Hell no. But in Lawson’s hands they are something else. She embraces generalities and tosses them back at the viewer.

"Prelapsarian," Zadie Smith calls Lawson's photographs: "before the fall." The book's final photo encapsulates Smith's thought — a naked couple sitting amid lush vegetation. But her words might describe any photo in the book, which is seeped throughout in a tone of Edenic timelessness. They seem to exist outside of time or place. Long before receiving her MFA, Lawson's own creation story carried seeds of photo prehistory. She grew up in Rochester. Her grandmother worked for George Eastman, her mother for Kodak. Her father was an avid photographer. "I was destined to be an artist with a camera," she tells Arthur Jafa in an interview included in the book. She's far surpassed those beginnings at this point, with an MFA, Guggenheim fellowship, and now Aperture monograph in hand.


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Blake Andrews is a photographer based in Eugene, OR. He writes about photography at blakeandrews.blogspot.com.


Books 2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day Five Day 5 of our 14-day series featuring the Favorite Photobooks of 2018! This year we asked a number of luminaries from the photobook world to select their favorite photobook of the year. The list will continue to grow over the next two weeks, so check back each day for a new group of favorite books!"
https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/index.cfm


2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day 5

This year we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of our renowned listing of the year's best photobooks. To mark this milestone, we've decided to do something a bit different. We've asked 88 internationally recognized luminaries from the photobook world to choose their favorite photobook of the year. Their favorite book could be unforgettable for any number of reasons but the chosen books affected our selectors on a very personal level. These books led each of our contributors to conclude, "If there's one book not to miss this year, it would be this!"

Each day for the following two weeks we will publish additional titles selected by our distinguished group of photobook lovers. Subscribe to PhotoBookDaily to get our email announcements in advance!

Check back daily to see a new group of favorite books!



Melanie McWhorter's Favorite

Jasper
Photographs by Matthew Genitempo

"Jasper opens with a poem by Frank Wright that begins to describe what Genitempo has captured in his photographs and the designers in this book: “there is another world.” This book is near perfect."





Terri Weifenbach's Favorite

Halfstory Halflife
Photographs by Raymond Meeks

"It seems to me that a true signifier of a work of art is its power to suggest more than any words surrounding it can describe. Halfstory Halflife with its restless corporeal forms and surrounding notes has this intelligence, one that is not limited to thought."




Jonathan Blaustein's Favorite

Aunt Paloma Was a Pigeon
Photographs, illustrations, design, and text by Alice Garret-Jones

"2018 is one of those years that I'll be glad to see go come December 31st. The absolute insanity that has plagued America in particular, and global geo-politics in general, feels overwhelming, and in my opinion is best countered with a healthy dose of absurdity."




Tamara Shopsin's Favorite

Issue 11 of Der Grief
Edited by Jason Fulford

"Der Greif asks photographers to submit their photos with the caveat that an editor can use the images any which way. It seems batshit crazy and brave to let someone run wild with your photos, but I’m glad they did."





Michael Schmelling's Favorite

Map Pointz
Edited by Guadalupe Rosales

"Looking back on the train-wreck that was social media in 2018, it may be comforting to point out a few bright spots — one of those being the community-sourced photo archives of Guadalupe Rosales: Veteranas and Rucas, and Map Pointz, both of which started as Instagram accounts."





Anouk Kruithof's Favorite

Masken
Photographs by Michael Etzensperger

"The world is a messed up place; why are we still wearing masks? Do we want to hide our true identity? Old masks are like magical entities from the past: strongly used in many traditions, spiritual ceremonies, and celebrations. Now we live in a time where our online persona can become a mask in itself, we’re somewhat lost in the truth about masks and the comfort a metaphorical mask gives us to provide us safety."






Books 2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day Four Day 4 of our 14-day series featuring the Favorite Photobooks of 2018! This year we asked a number of luminaries from the photobook world to select their favorite photobook of the year. The list will continue to grow over the next two weeks, so check back each day for a new group of favorite books!"
https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/index.cfm


2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day 4

This year we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of our renowned listing of the year's best photobooks. To mark this milestone, we've decided to do something a bit different. We've asked 88 internationally recognized luminaries from the photobook world to choose their favorite photobook of the year. Their favorite book could be unforgettable for any number of reasons but the chosen books affected our selectors on a very personal level. These books led each of our contributors to conclude, "If there's one book not to miss this year, it would be this!"

Each day for the following two weeks we will publish additional titles selected by our distinguished group of photobook lovers. Subscribe to PhotoBookDaily to get our email announcements in advance!

Check back daily to see a new group of favorite books!



Adam Bell's Favorite

Wood River Blue Pool + Blue Pool Cecelia
Photographs by Jo Ann Walters. Text by Laura Wexler.

"Two books in one, these individual volumes could easily exist on their own, but form a symbiotic relationship, strengthening and enriching each other. Good work often takes a long time to find a proper home; rarely is it presented in such a powerful and elegant package."




Raymond Meeks's Favorite

Driftless
Photographs by Jason Vaughn

"In the face of current events and recent news cycles, Driftless (TBW Books) offers levity and hope in the verbal meanderings of Brad Zellar (“days like music sucked from a car window dissolved like a dream”) while laying straight the tenuous and shifting terrain photographer Jason Vaughn inhabits."




Ed Panar's Favorite

Domesticated Land
Photographs by Susan Lipper

"The intensity of the sun feels like it was burnt through the exposures straight onto the luscious, tri-tone printed pages of the book to reveal crisp desert vistas full of rich details and subtle layers that reward repeated readings. This is not your forefathers desert."






photo-eye Gallery Holiday Gift Guide
Prints under $1,500
The gallery staff at photo-eye have selected some of our favorite prints to fit your holiday spending budget.


The gallery staff at photo-eye have selected some of our favorite prints to fit your holiday spending budget. We hope wherever you are this season, you find a quiet moment to take in the beauty around you. All of our artists here at photo-eye have ordered their lives around capturing the moments that have impacted them across the world, through many subjects. Please allow us to pass on their gratitude for your support of their craft. Your patronage to the gallery allows our photographers to continue to do what they love. Many thanks and peaceful holiday thoughts from our hearts to yours.

Tom Chambers, Hide Your Eyes, 2018, Archival Pigment Print, 22x13" Image, Edition of 20, $950


Mitch Dobrowner, Lightning Storm and Homestead, 2017 Archival Pigment Print, 14x20" Image, Edition of 40, $1,500

Douglas Levere, Snowflake 2014.02.09.007, Archival Pigment Print, 12x12" Image, Edition of 10, $500

Tom Chambers, Seabird Mimicry / Mímica de aves marinas, Archival Pigment Ink Print, 14x14" Image, 1/20, $750


David H. Gibson, Cypress Island with Cypress, Village Creek, Texas, 1987 Gelatin-Silver Print,
 7x23" Image, 16x32" Mat, 3/48, $800
Kate Breakey, Five Birds in Tree, Archival Pigment Ink on Glass, 24kt Gold Leaf, 8.5x11" Image, 4/20, $1370

Tom Chambers: DREAMING IN REVERSE SOÑANDO HACIA ATRÁ photo-eye EDITIONS portfolio $1,300.
12 Archival Pigment Prints, Custom Engraved Aluminum Case, Limited Edition of 30

Ernie Button, Planet Whiskey, Planet Signet 181, Archival Pigment Print, 15x15" Image, Edition of 10, $950

Des Oiseaux, Photographs by Pentti Sammallahti. Text by Guilhem Lesaffre. Editions Xavier Barral, Paris, France, 2018.
120 pp., 66 black-and-white illustrations, 8x10¼". Hardbound: $60.00

Mitch Dobrowner, Saucer-Field, 2012 Archival Pigment Print, 14x20" Image, Edition of 45, $1,500

Tom Chambers, Marwari Stallion #1, Archival Pigment Print, 14x15" Image, Edition of 20, $950

Pentti Sammallahti, Hanko, Finland, 2014, Gelatin-Silver Print, 6.5x6.5" Image, $1,300

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published. 
Prices will increase as the print editions sell.

For more information, and to purchase prints, please contact Gallery Staff at 
505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com


On view through February 16th, 2019

» View the Work

» Read Our Interview 
   with Tom Chambers

» Purchase the Monograph

photo-eye Gallery
541 S. Guadalupe Street
Santa Fe, Nm 87501
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Books 2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day Three Day 3 of our 14-day series featuring the Favorite Photobooks of 2018! This year we asked a number of luminaries from the photobook world to select their favorite photobook of the year. The list will continue to grow over the next two weeks, so check back each day for a new group of favorite books!"
https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/index.cfm



This year we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of our renowned listing of the year's best photobooks. To mark this milestone, we've decided to do something a bit different. We've asked 88 internationally recognized luminaries from the photobook world to choose their favorite photobook of the year. Their favorite book could be unforgettable for any number of reasons but the chosen books affected our selectors on a very personal level. These books led each of our contributors to conclude, "If there's one book not to miss this year, it would be this!"

Each day for the following two weeks we will publish additional titles selected by our distinguished group of photobook lovers. Subscribe to PhotoBookDaily to get our email announcements in advance!

Check back daily to see a new group of favorite books!



Susan Burnstine's Favorite

Littoral Drift + Ecotone
Photographs by Meghann Riepenhoff

"During a time when the natural world is rapidly changing and regularly vanishing before our eyes, the impermanent nature of Meghan Riepenhoff’s large-scale, camera-less cyanotypes made in collaboration with waves, wind, rain and sediment, precipitation and materials in the landscape strikes a deep chord."




Laura Moya's Favorite

Summer of the Fawn
Photographs by Alain Laboile

"Transported to his corner of village life in France, I get to hang out with his children who make their home and gardens a playground of artful frolic: finding deer antlers! Climbing hay bales! Wearing a tutu instead of clothing! Drawing, painting, running with dogs, and no doubt falling asleep exhausted but happy at day’s end."




Tim Carpenter's Favorite

Looking Up Ben James
Photographs by John Gossage

"The pictures are ten years old, and not “timeless” exactly but rather not of a time. Topicality is never much of an element in Gossage anyway because his pictures don’t rely on subject matter for meaning; rather they are new things in the world that engender their own authority."




Andrew Phelps's Favorite

The Arsenic Eaters
Photographs by Simon Brugner

"He combines historical and found images along with his own in what feels like a seamless collection somewhere between a medical examiner's notebook, a junkie's scrapbook, and a police detective's case file. Brugner dives into some of the original caves — which can still be visited, assuming one knows where to look — hidden away behind and below farmhouses in the mountains of Austria."




Aline Smithson's Favorite

Friends, Enemies and Strangers
Photographs by Oliver Wasow

"I jumped in with great curiosity and came away thinking about the potential of individuals–something I always consider when taking a portrait, and it appears that Mr. Wasow does the same–elevating his subjects, whether he likes them or not, to a place that ranges between beautiful, poignant, and barely tolerable."




Carolyn Drake's Favorite

How We See: Photobooks by Women
Edited by Russet Lederman, Olga Yatskevich and Michael Lang

"Women artists, including myself, sometimes cringe at the idea of being pigeonholed into women-only projects. Perhaps it's the sense that being isolated in this category keeps you at the fringe. Or perhaps it's the wish not to confine the reading of your work to a gender-based lens. But books such as this remind me that “the majors” are often driven by a system of judgment that idealizes the prejudices of the marketplace, and that the fringe is actually a compelling place to be."






Books 2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day Two Day 2 of our 14-day series featuring the Favorite Photobooks of 2018! This year we asked a number of luminaries from the photobook world to select their favorite photobook of the year. The list will continue to grow over the next two weeks, so check back each day for a new group of favorite books!"
https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/index.cfm


2018 Favorite Photobooks — Day 2

This year we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of our renowned listing of the year's best photobooks. To mark this milestone, we've decided to do something a bit different. We've asked 88 internationally recognized luminaries from the photobook world to choose their favorite photobook of the year. Their favorite book could be unforgettable for any number of reasons but the chosen books affected our selectors on a very personal level. These books led each of our contributors to conclude, "If there's one book not to miss this year, it would be this!"

Each day for the following two weeks we will publish additional titles selected by our distinguished group of photobook lovers. Subscribe to PhotoBookDaily to get our email announcements in advance!

Check back daily to see a new group of favorite books!



Jason Fulford's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Jason&Lastname=Fulford
Look It's Getting Sunny Outside!!!
Photographs by Sohrab Hura

"Look It's Getting Sunny Outside!!! is beautiful, honest, funny and heartbreaking. It's a simple story about photographer Sohrab Hura's mom and her dog. Sohrab is based in Delhi, India, and he self-published this book."




Janet Delaney's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Janet&Lastname=Delaney
Landfall
Photographs by Mimi Plumb

"The images weave together disparate thoughts to create an uncomfortable but salient whole. When seen collectively the photographs perfectly name the dark side of our current emotional and political life."




Kris Graves's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Kris&Lastname=Graves
Wood River Blue Pool
Photographs by Jo Ann Walters

"Walters has been working on this series since the 1980s, and the imagery has become a historical time capsule for a subset of American life spanning almost forty decades. Within is a project focusing on women. There are overwhelming moments of confidence and a distinct awareness of the passage of time."




Blake Andrews's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Blake&Lastname=Andrews
Deana Lawson
Photographs by Deana Lawson

"Deana Lawson's debut monograph hit me like a ton of bricks. At first glance these domestic scenes seem be documentary. Instead they're carefully choreographed by Lawson to explore issues of race, class, and the consensual aspect of portraiture."




Ania Nałęcka-Milach's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Ania&Lastname=Nalecka-Milach
On Abortion
Photographs by Laia Abril

"Probably everybody is writing about On Abortion now. And, yes, they should. I wish it was translated to Polish. And it should be to as many languages as possible. The book reminds us why we make books really – to give testimony and record stories that matter in a skillful and responsible way. Thank you, Laia."




Erik van der Weijde's Favorite

https://www.photoeye.com/Best-Books-2018/details.cfm?FirstName=Erik&Lastname=van%20der%20Weijde
Eggs and Rarities
Photographs by Paul Kooiker

"Eggs and Rarities reads like a visual encyclopedia of the artist's life and the history of photography. Beautiful images set in striking spreads and a bold book design by Jurgen Maelfeyt raise the bar for good photo books. Not an easy book, but a milestone in Kooiker's oeuvre."