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Book Review Memory City By Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb Reviewed by Tom Leininger Photography is as intertwined with memory as it is with light, shadow and surface. The individual film or sensor choice made by the photographer determines how memory is rendered, a choice that is as important as what the photographer puts in front of their camera. In their new book, Memory City, Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb investigate Rochester, New York during the time Eastman Kodak was in bankruptcy.

Memory CityBy Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb.
 Radius Books, 2014.
 
Memory City
Reviewed by Tom Leininger

Memory City
Photographs by Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb
Radius Books, 2014. 172 pp., 45 coor illustrations, 9¾x12¼".


Photography is as intertwined with memory as it is with light, shadow and surface. The individual film or sensor choice made by the photographer determines how memory is rendered, a choice that is as important as what the photographer puts in front of their camera. In their new book, Memory City, Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb investigate Rochester, New York during the time Eastman Kodak was in bankruptcy. They explore how memory, photography, film and the book making process come together to make a statement about a place during a particular time.


Book Review Art Fare By Andy Freeberg Reviewed by David Ondrik Andy Freeberg’s second monograph, Art Fare, is a typology of the interminable and ubiquitous art fairs that are now an entrenched part of the contemporary art market. The homophone title works as a wonderfully to-the-point artist statement: art entertainment is art money.

Art Fare. By Andy Freeberg.
Sojourn Books, 2014.
 
Art Fare
Reviewed by David Ondrik

Art Fare
Photographs by Andy Freeberg
Sojourn Books, 2014. 88 pp., 42 color illustrations, 11x14".


Andy Freeberg’s second monograph, Art Fare, is a typology of the interminable and ubiquitous art fairs that are now an entrenched part of the contemporary art market. The homophone title works as a wonderfully to-the-point artist statement: art entertainment is art money. The photography is well done, although like all typologies shooting the subject in a consistent, analytical manner trumps other concerns. There are a few clever compositions, like where installers look to be holding back the crush of an anxious mob, or where an artist’s head is almost literally stuck up his own naked posterior. How a viewer responds to the images will depend more on how they respond to art fairs than any quality of the photography itself. Each picture of sales booths staffed with gallery owners, assistants, and the art they’re hocking are presented as “walk-by shootings.” They can’t really be spontaneous since Freeberg would need to acquire model releases and convince the artists to agree to have their art appear in the pictures. It’s entirely possible the behind the scenes legal wrangling was an extremely complicated part of this project.

Book of the Week
Book of the Week: A Pick by Alec Soth Photographer Alec Soth selects the five books from oodee's POV Female Bogotá series as photo-eye Book of the Week.
Embera-chamis – ¡chao Nos Vemos! by Karen Paulina Biswell
 
Nada Es Eterno by Guadalupe Ruiz
 
Masked by Joana Toro

 Todo Se Parece a Su Dueno by Ana Maria Ruiz
 
Ventanas by Estefania Gonzalez
oodee, 2014
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from photographer Alec Soth who has selected the five books from oodee's POV Female Bogotá series: Embera-chamis – ¡chao Nos Vemos! by Karen Paulina Biswell, Nada Es Eterno by Guadalupe Ruiz, Masked by Joana Toro, Todo Se Parece a Su Dueno by Ana Maria Ruiz and Ventanas by Estefania Gonzalez.

"I once met a collector who said he would purchase every photobook published in the US in any given year. Back in the day, he explained, this number could be counted on two hands. With the recent boom in photobook publishing, I’ve heard more and more grumbling in collector circles. Among the complaints are (1) there are too many books to keep up with (2) photobooks have become too expensive. While I understand the frustrations to some extent, we should be wary of succumbing to a false nostalgia for an earlier time.

When I was a student twenty-five years ago, the only place to find a photography book was at a museum and the selection was primarily made up of American men. I recently looked at one of the books I bought back then, William Eggleston’s Democratic Forest, and was surprised to see a $50 price tag.

It’s interesting to counter that with what is available now. After writing a blog post inquiring about the current status of photography in Colombia, a publisher in London (oodee) sent me five publications made by female photographers from Bogotá. Not only do all five publications have excellent photography, design and printing, they are all priced reasonably.

I feel lucky to have been exposed to this incredible work in print. I’ve been a fan of Guadalupe Ruiz’s domestic dramas for some time, but had never encountered Estefanía González’s wonderfully voyeuristic portraits or Joana Toro’s depiction of fantastically costumed ‘black cowboys.’

While nobody can’t keep track of every book being published, we are lucky for publishers like oodee that make the tent for photography so much bigger than it used to be."—Alec Soth

Purchase Embera-chamis – ¡chao Nos Vemos!
Purchase Nada Es Eterno
Purchase Masked
Purchase Todo Se Parece a Su Dueno
Purchase Ventanas

All five books are available in a limited edition box set that includes five prints. Copies are very limited. See it here.

Embera-chamis – ¡chao Nos Vemos!  by Karen Paulina Biswell, oodee 2014
Nada Es Eterno by Guadalupe Ruiz, oodee 2014
Masked by Joana Toro, oodee 2014
 Todo Se Parece a Su Dueno by Ana Maria Ruiz, oodee 2014
Ventanas by Estefania Gonzalez, oodee 2014


Alec Soth (b. 1969) is a photographer born and based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 2008, Soth started his own publishing company, Little Brown Mushroom. Soth is represented by Sean Kelly in New York, Weinstein Gallery in Minneapolis, Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco, and is a member of Magnum Photos.







See more Book of the Week picks


Book Review Face in the Crowd By Alex Prager Reviewed by Karen Jenkins Crowds unnerve and excite for both their scattered unpredictability and swarm-like consensus. Alex Prager has sought to dissect their power in Face in the Crowd; not with the street photographer’s intimate immersion, but rather through staged replication and an omniscient remove.

Face in the Crowd. By Alex Prager.
Lehmann Maupin, 2014.
 
Face in the Crowd
Reviewed by Karen Jenkins

Face in the Crowd
Photographs by Alex Prager
Lehmann Maupin, 2014. 60 pp., illustrated throughout, 9¾x12¾".


Crowds unnerve and excite for both their scattered unpredictability and swarm-like consensus. Alex Prager has sought to dissect their power in Face in the Crowd; not with the street photographer’s intimate immersion, but rather through staged replication and an omniscient remove. Assembled for twelve large-scale color photographs (part of a recent exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery of Art), Prager’s crowds populate not just the street, but the airport, party, theater and beach, painstakingly cast, costumed, staged and lit — in total fabrication and parallel universe. Where everyone is out of place, she sets their mark. Where frenetic motion rules, she stops them in their tracks. Where uncertainty and anxiety manifest, she makes a monument of the awkward, on pause for our scrutiny like so many Duane Hanson sculptures. And then she sets them in motion, giving isolation and disconnection another look in a ten-minute, three-channel video installation, (represented in the catalog with selected stills), where certain characters from the photographs reappear, along with a featured performance by film actress Elizabeth Banks, alone in the crowd.

photo-eye Gallery Nick Brandt - Behind the Photo: Cheetah and Cubs Lying on Rock, Serengeti, 2007 In early May, Nick Brandt began posting the stories behind his beautiful and evocative portraits of African animals to his Facebook page. Brandt has graciously given us permission to reproduce them on photo-eye Blog. This week, Cheetah and Cubs Lying on Rock, Serengeti, 2007.
In early May, Nick Brandt began posting the stories behind his beautiful and evocative portraits of African animals to his Facebook page. Brandt has graciously given us permission to reproduce them on photo-eye Blog.

Cheetah & Cubs Lying on Rock, Serengeti, 2007 — Nick Brandt

Book Review Typology 1979 By Joachim Brohm Reviewed by Colin Pantall I flicked open my English newspaper today and landed on a story about gardening. There was a picture of Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss tending a window box, an example of how great and trendy gardening has become amongst the wealthy young.

Typology 1979. By Joachim Brohm.
MACK, 2014.
 
Typology 1979
Reviewed by Colin Pantall

Typology 1979
Photographs by Joachim Brohm
MACK, 2014. 98 pp., 35 color illustrations, 9½x10¼". 


I flicked open my English newspaper today and landed on a story about gardening. There was a picture of Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss tending a window box, an example of how great and trendy gardening has become amongst the wealthy young. In the UK, gardening is listed fifth in a list of top activities for the 25-35 age group and is an extension of a food culture where the sourcing of produce adds mystique and value to what you eat.

Interview Interview: Victoria Sambunaris - Part II In Part II of our two part interview, photo-eye's Melanie McWhorter talks to Victoria Sambunaris about her interest in geology, recent projects and her new publication Taxonomy of the Landscape from Radius Books.

Taxonomy of a Landscape. By Victoria Sambunaris.
Radius Books, 2014.
 
Victoria Sambunaris has been photographing the far reaches of America for over twelve years, venturing out on solo journeys to the Alaskan frontier, Hawaiian volcanic landscapes and the United States/Mexico border among many other locations. Her desire to document the grand idea of the American Dream and how it manifests itself in the culture and landscape are based in her personal and professional experience and her exploration of many fields of study including geology, cartography, economics, and art. In her documentary process she uses journals, Polaroids and large format photographs to convey her ideas and create a personal record of her numerous explorations of the country.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Erik van der Weijde Artist and publisher Erik van der Weijde selects Entre Entree by Stephan Keppel as photo-eye Book of the Week.
Entre Entree. By Stephan Keppel.
Fw: Books, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from artist and publisher Erik van der Weijde who has selected Entre Entree by Stephan Keppel published by Fw: Books.

Books In Stock at photo-eye: Out of Print Four out of print titles from Roger Eberhad, Anders Petersen, Masahisa Fukase and Bernd and Hilla Becher.


This week we're excited to feature a new selection of out-of-print books. Due to limited availability, purchase links will put you in touch with us via email unless otherwise noted. The images in this post depict the actual books for sale. Questions? Send us an email.

Book Review The Day the Dam Collapses By Hiroshi Watanabe Reviewed by Blake Andrews Judging by his photographs Hiroshi Watanabe has always had a deep contemplative streak. But in recent years it has become outsized. Maybe he feels the rush of late middle age as he approaches his mid-sixties. Or perhaps it's inspired by the birth of his son 5 years ago. Whatever the cause, he's been doing some extra deep thinking lately about, you know, the big stuff.

The Day the Dam Collapses. By Hiroshi Watanabe.
Daylight Books, 2014.
 
The Day the Dam Collapses
Reviewed by Blake Andrews

The Day the Dam Collapses
By Hiroshi Watanabe
Daylight Books, 2014. 88 pp., 66 color illustrations, 7½x9½".


Judging by his photographs Hiroshi Watanabe has always had a deep contemplative streak. But in recent years it has become outsized. Maybe he feels the rush of late middle age as he approaches his mid-sixties. Or perhaps it's inspired by the birth of his son 5 years ago. Whatever the cause, he's been doing some extra deep thinking lately about, you know, the big stuff. The cycle of humanity and the universe. The end of time. Death. God. Birth. It's all that mysterious crap you used to debate back in college drunk at 3 am. You never settled it then and you never will because there've never been any final answers. But the issues become harder to ignore in later years, in particular the central one: What does it all mean?

Interview Interview: Victoria Sambunaris - Part I In Part I of our two part interview, photo-eye's Melanie McWhorter talks to Victoria Sambunaris about becoming a photographer, her documentary process and her new publication Taxonomy of the Landscape from Radius Books.

Taxonomy of a Landscape. By Victoria Sambunaris.
Radius Books, 2014.
 
Victoria Sambunaris has been photographing the far reaches of America for over twelve years, venturing out on solo journeys to the Alaskan frontier, Hawaiian volcanic landscapes and the United States/Mexico border among many other locations. Her desire to document the grand idea of the American Dream and how it manifests itself in the culture and landscape are based in her personal and professional experience and her exploration of many fields of study including geology, cartography, economics, and art. In her documentary process she uses journals, Polaroids and large format photographs to convey her ideas and create a personal record of her numerous explorations of the country.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Christopher J. Johnson Reviewer and poet Christopher J. Johnson selects Pikin Slee by Viviane Sassen as photo-eye Book of the Week.
Pikin Slee. By Viviane Sassen.
Prestel, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from reviewer and poet Christopher J. Johnson who has selected Pikin Slee by Viviane Sassen published by Prestel.

Book Review Untitled: (I've taken too many photos / I've never taken a photo) By Anouk Kruithof Reviewed by Colin Pantall How do you edit your pictures? How do you decide what goes into your photobook or exhibition? You can layout your piles of prints and flick them back and forth between piles of yeses, nos, and maybes like a twitching picture monkey.

Untitled. By Anouk Kruithof and Harrison Medina.
Stress Press, 2014.
 
Untitled: (I've taken too many photos / I've never taken a photo)
Reviewed by Colin Pantall

Untitled: (I’ve taken too many photos / I’ve never taken a photo)
Photographs by Anouk Kruithof. Edited by Harrison Medina.
Stress Press, 2014. 112 pp., color illustrations, 8¼x11".


How do you edit your pictures? How do you decide what goes into your photobook or exhibition? You can layout your piles of prints and flick them back and forth between piles of yeses, nos, and maybes like a twitching picture monkey. Or maybe you can seek advice from experts and, with their conflicting suggestions firmly in hand, end up twisting yourself into multiple layers of indecision about exactly what it is you’re trying to do with your pictures.

photo-eye Gallery From the Flat Files: Platinum Recording - Prints by Kevin O'Connell, James Pitts, & Nick Brandt “The prince of all media” — is how Alfred Stieglitz once referred to the platinum printing process. Indeed, platinum printing lives up to this moniker as it is one of the oldest, most refined, and stable of all black and white procedures in photographic history. Here at photo-eye Gallery we are proud to represent a few photographers who print with this noble metal including: James Pitts, Kevin O’Connell, and Nick Brandt.

Nick Brandt – Ostrich Egg Abandoned, Amboseli, 2007
28x36 inch Platinum Print

“The prince of all media” — is how Alfred Stieglitz, Photo-Secessionist and founder of Camera Work, once referred to the platinum printing process. Indeed, platinum printing lives up to this moniker as it is one of the oldest, most refined, and stable of all black and white procedures in photographic history.

Book Review Grassland By H. Lee Reviewed by Blake Andrews My favorite marijuana joke is about three guys who walk into a bar. The first man is very tall. He walks over to the bartender and says… No, wait. I'm getting it wrong. The second guy is the tall one because… Let's see. He asks the bartender for a glass of water and… No, hold on… That's not right. Let me start over…

Grassland. By H. Lee.
Kehrer Verlag, 2014.
Grassland
Reviewed by Blake Andrews

Grassland
Photographs by H. Lee
Kehrer Verlag, 2014. 112 pp., 80 color illustrations, 9½x11¾".


My favorite marijuana joke is about three guys who walk into a bar. The first man is very tall. He walks over to the bartender and says… No, wait. I'm getting it wrong. The second guy is the tall one because… Let's see. He asks the bartender for a glass of water and… No, hold on… That's not right. Let me start over… How did it go? Something about a priest… And I know the punch line — melting ice! But I can't remember the rest of it exactly. But it was funny. Trust me, hilarious. Um, I guess you had to be there.