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Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Forrest Soper Forrest Soper selects Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs by Diane Arbus as Book of the Week.
Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs 
 By Diane Arbus. Aperture and the 
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2018.
Forrest Soper selects Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs by Diane Arbus from Aperture and the Smithsonian American Art Museum as Book of the Week.

"The photobook world is plagued by a myriad of posthumous publications by notable photographers. While there is nothing intrinsically wrong with these publications, as their educational value cannot be understated, many seem cold, distant, and detached. Exhaustive catalogs with pages of academic text place so much importance on formality that the artistic essence of the original photographs seems distilled — almost as if the artist’s original vision had been forgotten. At the very least, few of these publications seem to propel the evolution of the photobook genre.

An Exception can be made for Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs. Published alongside an exhibition of the same name at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, this book highlights one of the most important photographic publications ever made.

During her lifetime, A box of ten photographs was the only physical collection of her work that Diane Arbus personally made for sale. The portfolios were housed in a plexiglass box and contained ten prints, each interlaced with vellum sheets upon which extended hand-written titles for the subsequent photographs were written. Intended to be printed in an edition of fifty, Arbus only completed prints for eight of the portfolios, of which only four had been sold, prior to her death. The subject of the recent Aperture publication focuses on edition #5, sold to Bea Feitler, which included an additional eleventh photograph.

Published as a book for the first time, A box of ten photographs is so beautifully reproduced that it is only one small step below a professionally made facsimile of the original portfolio. The printing quality is impeccable, and the attention to detail in the handwritten titles is commendable. Unless you have access to authentic gelatin silver prints, the reproductions in this book are the closest you can get to viewing Arbus’ work as it was originally intended.

After the initial reproductions, a wonderful illustrated essay by the curator John P. Jacob thoroughly discusses the importance and history of this body of work.

At the end of the day, there is nothing I can say about Arbus that has not already been said. Every living photographer working as an artist is indebted to her in some way. Her work has become legendary and her life has transcended into myth. Her images are forever ingrained in our collective memories and publications of her work can be found in libraries across the globe.

I have many books on Diane Arbus in my library, but A box of ten photographs is the first publication that feels like it was made by the artist herself." — Forrest Soper

Purchase Book

Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs By Diane Arbus. Aperture and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2018.
Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs By Diane Arbus. Aperture and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2018.


Forrest Soper is an artist and photographer based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Forrest is the editor of photo-eye Blog, a former photochemical lab technician at Bostick & Sullivan, and a graduate of the Santa Fe University of Art and Design.

photo-eye Gallery The Joy of Getting There
Steve Fitch on Vanishing Vernacular
In this interview, Gallery Associate Yoana Medrano speaks with Steve Fitch about publishing Vanishing Vernacular, his love of the road trip, and what's next for the artist in 2018.

Blue Swallow Motel, Hwy. 66, Tucumcari, New Mexico; July, 1990, Archival Pigment Print, 16x20" Image
Edition of 12 $2000  © Steve Fitch

If I were to take a vacation now, I imagine getting on a quick flight to start an adventure in some far off land. Today, I feel that we are far more focused on arriving at the destination then experiencing the journey of getting there. We peer down from oval airplane windows and watch as we speedily fly over so many cities and towns that we will never get to know as opposed to jumping into a vehicle and heading out onto the open road.  On the road, we might find a once-in a-lifetime place or perhaps new people who remind us of our biological need to be together. A road trip can pull us away from the fast-paced hustle and bustle or even away from our phones for just a moment. Both types of trips have their pros and cons, but the latter is quickly disappearing.

In Steve Fitch’s Vanishing Vernacular, he documents the disappearing structures and other architectural features that can be found along the two-lane highways of the West. I can imagine him pulling over at different spots that captured his attention – places originally meant to house a sleepy traveler, entertain the wildly bored, or capture the attention of all. I asked Steve to give us some insight into the process of publishing Vanishing Vernacular, as well as creating this body of work. 

Yoana Medrano: The staff at photo-eye Gallery were asked to pick a favorite photograph from the show. Do you have a favorite photograph from Vanishing Vernacular


Ft. Union Drive-In Theater, Las Vegas, New Mexico; July 12, 1982, Archival Pigment Print,16x20" Image, 
Edition of 12, $2000, © Steve Fitch 


Monolith, 2001- A Space Odyssey 
Steve Fitch:      Which is my favorite photograph in Vanishing Vernacular? Of course, that is a tough question to answer since I like so many of them. Maybe the photograph of the Fort Union Drive-in Theater in Las Vegas, New Mexico on page 31. I like the white rectangle of the screen, immobile and seemingly timeless, waiting to receive a projected image, in a beautiful, high plains landscape. It kind of reminds me of the monolith in Stanley Kubrick’s movie, 2001—A Space Odyssey. I also enjoy the photograph on page 40 of a weathered plywood sign floating in the sky above a southwestern landscape with a semi truck and solitary butte. Or the photograph on page 81 of the neon AA Motel sign with an arrow pointing to “Modern”. What is modern? Phone booths used to be but not anymore. A train blurs by next to the highway in beautiful dusk light.

YM:     What was the process of having this book published in comparison to your previous book publications?

SF:      The process of publishing Vanishing Vernacular was similar in one important way to all the book projects that I have been involved with, including Diesels and Dinosaurs, in that it was collaborative. With Diesels and Dinosaurs, two fellow photographers, Roger Minick and Richard Misrach, were instrumental in choosing and sequencing the photographs. Marks in Place, Gone, and Island in the Sky were all published by university presses which means a different procedure has to be negotiated: faculty committees and administrative committees have to approve the book before it can be designed, sequenced and produced which is all done in house. With Gone, for example, I had a lot of contact with the two book designers at UNM Press and one of the editors came up with the book's title. With my book, American Motel Signs, which was published by The Velvet Cell, I worked with the designer and publisher, Eanna de Fréine, entirely through the Internet; I have never met or spoken to him but only communicated online. We both worked on the selection of photographs but he was mostly responsible for the final selection and sequencing as well as the design. Working on Vanishing Vernacular was great because the two people I worked most closely with (designer David Skolkin, and Joanna Hurley, the book packager and editor), both live in Santa Fe, so I could meet with them frequently. And Toby Jurovics, who wrote an essay in the book, is a good friend with whom over several years I had many conversations about the project.

AA Motel, Holdrege, Nebraska, May 22, 1981, Archival Pigment Ink Print, 16x20" Image, 
Edition of 12, $2000, © Steve Fitch  
YM:     Do you have any advice for people looking to get published?

SF:      Getting a book published can be an exciting and satisfying experience but also an aggravating and expensive one. Unless it is a labor of love, it might not be worth the trouble. There are many options, today, for a person wishing to publish a book of photographs so do some research and, if possible, discuss your project with someone who has knowledge about those options.

YM:     The sequencing of the book has a very specific flow to it. What was the thought process?

SF:      Vanishing Vernacular mostly includes color work that I did beginning in 1979 but there are a couple of black-and-white images from the early 1970s and one from 1969. The first thing I had to do was figure out what photographs—out of the thousands that I had made—to select and how they should be strung together in a book. I wanted the book to be about something and not just a retrospective. Gradually, the hundred plus photographs ended up in roughly five groups: views, signs, night and neon, drive-in theaters, and radio towers. I didn’t, however, want to configure the book as five distinct sections; I wanted a flow, not a narrative, exactly, but a sequence that would override the five groupings so that the whole book feels, somehow, organic. Hopefully, the book achieves that. Another decision was to not place the title or caption on the page with each photograph but instead to have them all at the back of the book as notes. This would allow for a more visual experience and also allow for more detailed captions.

Radio Tower Between Trujillo & Las Vegas, New Mexico, September 9, 2006, Archival Pigment Print, 16x20" Image, Edition of 12, $2000, © Steve Fitch
YM:     What is so appealing about the two-lane highway?

SF:      What is so appealing about the two-lane highway? When you get on the interstate you drive 600 miles or so, as quickly as possible, and get off and stay in a motel just like the one you stayed in the night before. There is not much excitement or discovery or variety along the way. On two-lane highways you can experience time and place and adventure since what happens along the way is as important as the actual arrival at a destination. You are on a journey, which the interstates or even jet travel, have basically eliminated. A journey occurs through real time—not compressed time—and space, and it has no guarantees. Two-lane highways are different from each other and they allow for exploration, even require it. They are the Blue Highways that William Least Heat Moon wrote about. And they are adorned with the variety of landmarks that I have taken great pleasure in photographing and which make up this book: nutty signs like the El Kapp in Raton, New Mexico or motels with sublime neon like the Blue Swallow on Route 66 in Tucumcari.

YM:     Can you talk a bit about how you started shooting hop kilns and how that was your first introduction into documenting the vernacular?

SF:      As I write in my essay in the book, it was on day trips with my mother as she travelled around Mendocino County in northern California to make paintings of what she found interesting, that I noticed hop kilns. I was five or six years old and hop kilns were common architectural features of the landscape, used to dry hops, which were a major crop of the region before they were replaced by wine grapes. My mother liked to make paintings of them and a dozen years later I began to photograph the remaining hop kilns—most were being torn down or were burning down. I found them interesting because they were these unique structures designed to do only one thing: dry hops for brewing beer and they were disappearing. They were not to be found everywhere but only in a few counties in California (and Oregon and Washington). This made them—by definition—vernacular architecture and I have been interested in “the vernacular” in its many forms ever since. I must admit, part of my love of vernacular architecture is that it is not usually designed by architects but—in the case of hop kilns— by the farmers who grow the hops, which leads to an interesting variety of designs. Like drive-in movie theaters they are a folk architecture that is reflective of purpose and place.

YM:      You started photographing with film; your newer work is digital and you’ve been working with a drone lately. How do you like the transition and which do you prefer?

SF:      The transition for me from film to digital was gradual and is not complete. In 2005, on a sabbatical from teaching, I began to learn Photoshop and to scan my negatives and make inkjet prints while at the same time still making darkroom prints from negatives. By 2006 I was no longer working in a darkroom at all, so the transition to digital—at least in terms of making prints—was relatively quick and easy. However, it wasn’t until 2008 when I was making photographs for the book, Sun, Sticks and Mud that I really began to shoot digitally. Around 2010 I began to make the long, horizontal images, four of which are in the Vanishing Veracular exhibition, which could not very easily have been constructed using film—they basically demand that I shoot with a digital camera. In 2010, I made my last image using film and an 8x10 view camera but I still occasionally make pictures on two-and-a-quarter size film, such as the square images of motel signs that are in the exhibition, and I plan to continue doing that. And I may make some more images with film and my 8x10 view camera, who knows?

Muleshoe, Texas; October 14, 2012, Archival Pigment Print, 10x61" Image, Edition of 7, $4000, ©S teve Fitch
YM:     What’s next for you?

SF:      What is next for me? I plan to continue creating the wide, horizontal view photographs of murals and facades that I construct from a number of digital frames. And what is really interesting me now is to use a drone to make bird’s eye views of various subjects—such as small towns like Vaughn, or Ft. Sumner—and to pair those views with ground level views made in the same towns. For this work I have been inspired by the many beautiful 19th-century bird’s eye view lithographs of towns and cities in the American West that were published in John W. Reps' book, Cities of the American West published by Princeton University Press in 1979, one of my favorite books.
– YM

Vanishing Vernacular is on view at photo-eye Gallery through May 19th, 2018, and we will be hosting a Book Singing event with Steve Fitch on Saturday, May 12th from 2–4PM.

For more information on Vanishing Vernacular, and to purchase prints or a copy of the monograph, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

» View the Work

» Purchase the Book



Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Christian Michael Filardo Christian Michael Filardo selects Overflow by Takuma Nakahira as Book of the Week.
Overflow. By Takuma Nakahira Case Publishing, 2018.
Christian Michael Filardo selects Overflow, by Takuma Nakahira, from Case Publishing, as Book of the Week.

When one thinks of Japanese photography it’s easy to gravitate towards the extremely well-known masters: Fukase, Moriyama, and Araki. However, Takuma Nakahira is potentially one of the most influential Japanese photographers you’ve overlooked. Known primarily for his black-and-white work, Nakahira was one of the founding members of Provoke magazine, a quintessential building block of Japanese photography that helped form what contemporary Japanese photography is today. Since Nakahira’s passing in 2015 we’ve been lucky to see a few publications of his work see the light of day.

For Book of the Week this week, I’ve selected Takuma Nakahira’s Overflow from Case Publishing. Overflow is a body of work consisting of 48 color photographs shown for the first time in 1974 as an installation at The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. For the book version, the installation has been photographed with a digital camera and presented in a linear way. This approach essentially distorts the installation and re-contextualizes Nakahira’s images.

The result is a skewed presentation of Nakahira's extremely moody examination of urbanity. The seemingly random cropping of the installation is hard to pinpoint but makes sense in an abstract way and gives Overflow an extremely unique flow. While it feels impossible to examine these images as stand-alone documents, it is easy to comprehend the complex photographic style in which Nakahira operated. Overflow feels fast and loose, like a joyride through the city, as if Nakahira didn’t stop walking to take a single picture.

While confusing at first, Overflow is a constantly unfurling narrative. It renders the linear sequence powerless and creates a jumble that can be interpreted in a myriad of different ways. It doesn’t matter if you look at it from left to right or what page you begin on. Overflow is best experienced by chance and is a true testament to the genius mind of one of Japanese photography’s most underrated heroes. — Christian Michael Filardo

Purchase Book

Overflow. By Takuma Nakahira Case Publishing, 2018.
Overflow. By Takuma Nakahira Case Publishing, 2018.



Christian Michael Filardo is a Filipino American photographer, curator, and composer living and working in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This year they released their second book The Voyeur’s Gambit through Lime Lodge. Currently, they help run the gallery and performance space Etiquette and write critically for photo-eye and Phroom. Filardo is the current shipping manager at photo-eye Bookstore.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Laura M. André Laura M. André selects False Positives, with photographs by Esther Hovers, as Book of the Week.
False Positives, by Esther Hovers. 
Fw: Books, 2017.

Laura M. André selects False Positives by Esther Hovers, from Fw: Books, as Book of the Week.


Esther Hovers' recent project False Positives investigates how artificial intelligence surveillance systems detect potential criminal behavior in public spaces. The result is a visual taxonomy of eight aberrant behaviors that intelligence experts have identified as increasing the probability that something is amiss.

Hovers conceived of the project while visiting the La Défense business district of Paris and being struck by its brutal architecture and dense security web. She shot the photographs, however, in Brussels — the EU's de facto capital. Hovers positioned her camera in elevated positions above sidewalks, building entrances, and plazas in order to mimic the high placement of security cameras. The layered images in the book are a mix of straight documentary and posed tableaux. It's impossible to tell which is which — which, of course, is the point. What constitutes normal or abnormal behavior?

Hovers worked with Dutch security experts to learn how they use dataveillance (visual information to assemble data and measure potential threats). The book includes a mix of photographs and drawings that illustrate the eight anomalies, as well as the normative behavior for a given public space within Brussels: Standing Still, Fast Movements, Isolated Objects, People on Street Corners, Synchronized Group Movements, Repeatedly Looking Back, and Moving in Deviant Directions. It's up to the viewer to look critically at the images and decide whether they indicate a threat.

The ongoing debates about the effectiveness of mass "intelligent" surveillance systems in public spaces raise legitimate psychological, racial, and legal questions about what — if any — correlation exists between physical appearances, movement within space, group behavior, etc. Recent studies suggest that there is no reliable correlation. But looking through this book and becoming aware of these anomalous patterns led me to think differently — more suspiciously — about the way I perceive others within public spaces — a sad but true reality of our time.

Purchase Book

False Positives by Esther Hovers. Fw: Books, 2017.
False Positives by Esther Hovers. Fw: Books, 2017.



Laura M. André received her PhD in art history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and taught photo history at the University of New Mexico before leaving academia to work with photobooks. She is the manager of photo-eye's book division.


photo-eye Gallery New Gallery Associate Yoana Medrano Picks Her Favorite Fitch In this introduction, new photo-eye Gallery Associate Yoana Medrano shares a little about her background and chooses her favorite work from Steve Fitch’s Vanishing Vernacular.

The Opening and Artist Reception for Steve Fitch's Vanishing Vernacular
Steve Fitch’s Vanishing Vernacular opened Friday, March 30th at photo-eye Gallery, and the space was filled with people filing in to catch a glimpse of the exhibition. It is clear to see that Steve Fitch is a well-respected member of the photographic community. Vanishing Vernacular is on view through May 19th,  2018.

My name is Yoana Medrano and I am the new Gallery Associate at photo-eye gallery. Steve Fitch's Opening and Artist Reception was my first day at photo-eye and it had this this really wonderful feeling of “meant to be”. Steve was my first photography professor while I studied at Santa Fe University of Art and Design, and I tend to credit him for igniting my passion for photography. My first assignment, at photo-eye was to choose one of Fitch's photographs that speaks to me, and it is a real treat to be surrounded by his work as I begin my career.

Part of Vanishing Vernacular's appeal comes from the nostalgic factors that pull on your soul while showcasing evidence of a different time. This is certainly a show that evokes those feelings, and I’ve always been drawn to the classic neon lighting that scatters Route 66, encouraging patrons to come in and stay a while. It is quite difficult to pick just one.

Star-Vu Drive-In Theater, Longmont, Colorado; July, 1980, Archival Pigment Print, 16x20" Image, Edition of 12, $2000 © Steve Fitch 
Not only is Star-Vu Drive-In Theater my favorite work from Vanishing Vernacular, but it was the first one that caught my eye upon viewing the exhibition. I’ve spent some time admiring it in the gallery, and I struggle to find a fault in it. My eyes flicker around the scene, the way that I imagine florescent lights would, moving from corner to corner fascinated with the image's subtle details.

First, I like how carefully curated the scene looks; it shows how much time and patience went into capturing this image. For example, Fitch waits for the single moment in time where the sky mimics the neon lights on the drive-in's exterior — the color coordination almost makes the image look staged.

I also feel as though the signage in Steve's work is multipurpose. For example, the "One Way- Do Not Enter" sign in the lower left corner, seems to juxtapose itself telling the viewer that there is only one way, but this is way – their viewpoint, is not the right way. Mixed with the marquee title of Starting Over where the "Over" is over-exposed, these simple nuances in Fitch's work make me smile, and are part of the reason Star Vu is one of my favorites from Vanishing Vernacular.

Yoana Medrano, Gallery Associate
Yoana Medrano is a photographer based out of New Mexico. She received her BFA in photography from Santa Fe University of Art and Design where her passion for the medium was first evoked.  Yoana has joined photo-eye Gallery as an Associate.

Print prices were correct at the time of publication, for current details, and to purchase prints, please contact  Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com.

» View Additional Work by Steve Fitch

» Read More about Steve Fitch

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Forrest Soper Forrest Soper selects Home by Olivia Arthur, Antoine d’Agata, Jonas Bendiksen, Chien-Chi Chang, Thomas Dworzak, Elliott Erwitt, David Alan Harvey, Hiroji Kubota, Alex Majoli, Trent Parke, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, Mark Power, Moises Saman, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Alec Soth and Alex Webb as Book of the Week.
Home By Olivia Arthur, Antoine d’Agata, Jonas Bendiksen, 
Chien-Chi Chang, Thomas Dworzak, Elliott Erwitt, David Alan Harvey,
 Hiroji Kubota, Alex Majoli, Trent Parke, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, 
Mark Power, Moises Saman, Alessandra Sanguinetti, 
Alec Soth and Alex Webb Magnum Photos, 2018.
Forrest Soper selects Home by Olivia Arthur, Antoine d’Agata, Jonas Bendiksen, Chien-Chi Chang, Thomas Dworzak, Elliott Erwitt, David Alan Harvey, Hiroji Kubota, Alex Majoli, Trent Parke, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, Mark Power, Moises Saman, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Alec Soth and Alex Webb from Magnum Photos as Book of the Week.

"In 2017, FUJIFILM gave 16 Magnum photographers a GFX 50S medium-format digital camera and asked them to document ‘Home’ in whatever way they saw fit. The result was an incredibly personal and often experimental collection of photo essays that highlight the diversity of Magnum while shedding insight into some of its member's lives. Almost better suited to be 16 small volumes or zines rather than one large anthology, Home brings us into the lives of Magnum photographers, and in the process shows us photographs that we otherwise may never have seen.

We’re shown glimpses of family life as Mark Power sends his daughter off to university, while just pages away, Olivia Arthur gives birth to her second child. Alec Soth takes a long walk to work while Antoine d’Agata retraces the steps of Mary Magdalene while struggling with rehabilitation. Elliott Erwitt brings us into the humorous and chaotic world of his New York studio while Mosises Saman confronts his mixed heritage in Peru. Alex Webb abandons his traditional street photography to take calming panoramas in Cape Cod as Hiroji Kubota takes to a helicopter to photograph the islands of Japan from above.

At the end of the day, this book gave Magnum photographers the freedom and liberation to invest time in documenting something that they were truly invested in. Unburdened by the normal limitations of a traditional photo assignment, these photographers were left to their own devices, and as a result, the photographs are incredibly personal. This book does not contain the iconic or dramatic images that many expect from Magnum, but it gives something more important. The work highlights humanity, and in the process, it grants us a deeper understanding of the personal lives and characters of these legendary photographers. Anyone who has interest in the history of Magnum should pick up this well designed and deceptively endearing book." — Forrest Soper

Purchase Book

Home By Olivia Arthur, Antoine d’Agata, Jonas Bendiksen,  Chien-Chi Chang, Thomas Dworzak, Elliott Erwitt, David Alan Harvey, Hiroji Kubota, 
Alex Majoli, Trent Parke, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, Mark Power, Moises Saman, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Alec Soth and Alex Webb Magnum Photos, 2018.

Home By Olivia Arthur, Antoine d’Agata, Jonas Bendiksen,  Chien-Chi Chang, Thomas Dworzak, Elliott Erwitt, David Alan Harvey, Hiroji Kubota, 
Alex Majoli, Trent Parke, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, Mark Power, Moises Saman, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Alec Soth and Alex Webb Magnum Photos, 2018.




Forrest Soper is an artist and photographer based out of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Forrest is the editor of photo-eye Blog, a former photochemical lab technician at Bostick & Sullivan, and a graduate of the Santa Fe University of Art and Design.





photo-eye Gallery Opening Friday March 30th, 2018
Steve Fitch: Vanishing Vernacular
Please join us for Vanishing Vernacular an exhibition by represented artist Steve Fitch celebrating the release of his new monograph from George F. Thompson Publishing. An Opening and Artist Reception for Fitch will be held on Friday, March 30th corresponding with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Santa Fe Railyard Arts District.


STEVE FITCH
VANISHING VERNACULAR

Opening & Artist Reception: Friday, March 30, 5 – 7 PM
Book Signing: Saturday, May 12, 2 – 4 PM
On View: March 30 – May 19, 2018




Please join us for Vanishing Vernacular an exhibition by represented artist Steve Fitch celebrating the release of his new monograph from George F. Thompson Publishing. An Opening and Artist Reception for Fitch will be held on Friday, March 30th corresponding with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Santa Fe Railyard Arts District.

Vanishing Vernacular features a selection of color works by photographer Steve Fitch focusing primarily on the distinctive, idiosyncratic, and evolving features of the western roadside landscape including topologies of neon motel signs, drive-in movie theaters, radio towers, and ancient rock pictographs. photo-eye Gallery is also proud to display Fitch’s large-scale murals for the first time in Santa Fe.

"The photographs in [Vanishing Vernacular] blaze a trail through our Western landscape. It was a selective and personal view that was created over thirty-eight years and many miles traveled. Although it is my story, I think it is also one that most Americans who have wandered our roadways in the West will recognize and appreciate. It is also a story that is evolving and that has not ended.”
– Steve Fitch
Steve Fitch in his studio.

Steve Fitch is an American photographer born in 1949. He earned an MFA from the University of New Mexico in 1978, and has taught at UC Berkeley, the University of Colorado in Boulder, Princeton University, and, the College of Santa Fe. Fitch's photographs are included in the permanent collections of museums such as the Whitney Museum of American Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and The Art Institute of Chicago.



For more information, and to purchase prints, please contact Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com


Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Christian Michael Filardo Christian Michael Filardo selects Election Eve by William Eggleston as Book of the Week.
Election Eve. By William Eggleston Steidl, 2017.
Christian Michael Filardo selects Election Eve, by William Eggleston, from Steidl, as Book of the Week.

"Life used to be simple. Now it’s a little less simple and a lot more complicated. I started my viewing experience of Eggleston’s Election Eve like any logical person would, with four glasses of red wine.

It’s easy to think that things could have been different after any election. However, the night before the results are announced is a night that one remembers. It’s like the day before a baby is born, or the day you forget to put the trash on the curb. You can accept it, or you can regret it. For the most part, I’ve always been a fan of William Eggleston. Election Eve is as much about the American as it is about Eggleston. Unlike many Americans, however, Eggleston likes to stop and smell the roses. He doesn’t drive directly to his destination, rather he stops and takes his time. Photographing the crippled trees, the dilapidated houses, the fish fries, and empty lots.

America was different back then. Nowadays you can still go on for miles and not see a damn thing. However, you’re never too far away from a gas station or advertisement trying to warp your perception of reality. What does it really mean to elect a President of the United States of America? Do the trees notice the difference? Towards the end of this monograph, Eggleston photographs a number of churches that I don’t think he’d step foot in. I don’t perceive him to be a man of the lord. However, the picture Eggleston takes of a basketball hoop in this book feels as close to god as any image he’s made.

I suppose what I am trying to say here, is that William Eggleston cuts through the crap. He is the photographic wizard we all perceive him to be. He waves his wand at the mundane and it becomes important or beautiful. To think of this body of work as the result of a presidential election would be a mistake. Rather, I like to think about it as the result of an experience that an individual chose to embark on in search of answers that the press was not giving him. Eggleston wanted to be reminded what it felt like to drive, he wanted to remember what America dreams about at night. When the sun goes down, and the light fades from vision, and there is nothing left but a tree swaying in the humid breeze of the Georgian plains. Election Eve isn't about a specific Election, it’s about the mortality of a nation. It illustrates what it means to cast the ballot, to roll the dice, to take a chance on the land of freedom." — Christian Michael Filardo

Purchase Book

Election Eve. By William Eggleston Steidl, 2017.
Election Eve. By William Eggleston Steidl, 2017.



Christian Michael Filardo is a Filipino American photographer, curator, and composer living and working in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This year they released their second book The Voyeur’s Gambit through Lime Lodge. Currently, they help run the gallery and performance space Etiquette and write critically for photo-eye and Phroom. Filardo is the current shipping manager at photo-eye Bookstore.
photo-eye Gallery Maggie Taylor: Through the Looking-Glass
Conversation & Book Preview
Gallery Director Anne Kelly speaks to Maggie Taylor about her new book Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There– join us at photo-eye Gallery this Saturday, March 24th from 2-4 PM for a preview and Q&A with Taylor.

The cover for Maggie Taylor's forthcoming book Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There due May, 2018

More than 5 years in the making, Maggie Taylor is finally unveiling her new book Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There the widely anticipated follow up to her 2008 illustrated edition of Alice in Wonderland. Just like the previous release, Through the Looking-Glass… features Lewis Carroll's original text in its entirety accompanied by 64 fantastical photomontages created in Taylor's signature whimsical style.

We are delighted to invite you to meet photographer Maggie Taylor at photo-eye Gallery as she previews Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There. Copies of both the trade edition and limited edition will be available to handle during this event and the artist will be available to answer your questions. Please join us for this artist Q&A and rare opportunity to view this very special publication before its official release in May.

Five prints by Talyor from the series will also be on view at the Gallery as a part of our Winter Group Show.



Prints from Through the Looking-Glass… installed at photo-eye Gallery during the Winter Group Show

Gallery Director Anne Kelly recently spoke with Taylor about Through the Looking-Glass… about the process of making the book as well as insights to how and why the work was made.

Anne Kelly:     We're very excited about the forthcoming publication, what can you tell us about how your new book came about?

Maggie Taylor:     My Alice in Wonderland book, with Lewis Carroll’s full original text, was published in 2008.  There were 44 images in that series, and I have had it in mind to create images for the sequel, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, ever since.  It took me quite a while to collect materials for all of the characters and scenes, and I began really assembling finished images for the project in 2015.  Over the last 3 years, as I completed this series, I read and re-read the story countless times.  I also visited the Harry Ransom Center in Austin to do a bit of research and look at some of the Lewis Carroll photography albums they have in their collection.  Midway through the project I thought there would be approximately 50 images, but as I worked on them, the list of characters I wanted to include grew.  Eventually I settled on 64 images, which seemed appropriate because a game of chess is the underlying structure of the story, and there are 64 squares on that board.

BookTease of Maggie Taylor's Through the Looking-Glass… featuring the image What remains?
AK:     As I understand it, you are working with the same designer as your last book, No Ordinarily Days on the new book – what was the process like?

MT:     The wonderful San Francisco designer Connie Hwang created the design for this book—as well as my last two books and my website.  I love working with her.  We kept the same overall format as the Alice book so that it can be the companion volume, but made the design more contemporary.  Because Lewis Carroll made liberal use of italics in the story, the typeface needed to be easy to read, yet elegant.  One italicized word in a sentence can really change the meaning of the words, so we wanted to be sure the italics were easy to spot. We settled on a typeface called Scala Sans designed by Martin Majoor in 1993.  I love it!  Connie used design elements to reinforce or reflect elements in the story in a very poetic way in my opinion.

Strange Things, Archival Pigment Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 15, $1500 – Maggie Taylor
AK:     Can you share some details about the limited edition version of the book?

MT:     The limited edition of the book consists of 100 copies that are in cloth-covered boxes and come with an 8x8 inch print of the image on the back cover of the book: And What Alice Found There.  That image will not exist in the 8-inch size in any other place, so buying the limited edition is the only way to get the small version of it.

Through the Looking-Glass Limited Edition with And What Alice Found There signed 8x8" Archival Pigment Print – $800
AK:     Anything special you'd like to share about the creation of Through the Looking-Glass…?

The Feast, Archival Pigment Print, 8x8" Image, Edition of 15, $1500
– Maggie Taylor
MT:     The front and back images were conceived as a pair, and they were very nearly the final images I worked on for the project this past fall. Alice appears on the front cover in the real world before she climbs over the mantel and through the mirror.  In the distance you see her reflection has a crown, because once she completes her journey she becomes a queen.  Also on the far side of the glass in the distance you see the flying elephant (Anything but a regular bee.) Flipping the book over, you find the mirror image of Alice as seen from the fantasy, looking-glass world side of things.  Here, her reflection back in the real world has no crown, she is just an ordinary girl.  But she is accompanied by some of the creatures she meets along the journey.  Looking through the mirror “backwards” into the real world you also see a glimpse of the room where Alice’s story begins as she plays with her kittens by the fire.  My version of that room is William Henry Fox Talbot’s oriel window at Lacock Abbey.

The story was really delightful to spend time with — there are many more quirky characters than people generally recall.  Also my collection of daguerreotypes grew quite a bit over the last 5 years as I looked for more potential Alices, queens and kings.

Without my knowing it,
Archival Pigment Print, 8x8" Image,
Edition of 15, $1500 – Maggie Taylor
AK:     Any words of wisdom you would like to share about photo book publishing?

MT :     The process of completing a book is much more tedious and lengthy than I imagine every time—but in the end it is
worth it.  There are so many little details and decisions, and it is easy to become overwhelmed.  I am glad that I was able to work with a designer I trust and admire—that made the long process much more manageable.

—PE

photo-eye Gallery's Winter Group Show closes on Saturday, March 24th as well. Attending Maggie Taylor's Book Preview is also an excellent opportunity to view our survey exhibition before the show closes. 

For more information about Maggie Taylor, and to purchase her prints or books, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x202 or email us at gallery@photoeye.com

All prices listed are correct upon the time this post was published. Prints are limited and prices change as the edition sells. Please reach out for the most current information.






Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Laura M. André Laura M. André selects Obama: An Intimate Portrait, with photographs by Pete Souza, as Book of the Week.
Obama: An Intimate Portrait, by Pete Souza. 
Little, Brown and Company, 2017.

Laura M. André selects Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza, from Little, Brown and Company, as Book of the Week.

Obama: An Intimate Portrait is a tangible reminder of photography's power to shape presidential legacies; it's also destined to become a crucial memory book of an important shared experience.

Sold out upon publication, the book of photographs by former Chief Official White House Photographer Pete Souza proved to be so popular that its publisher, Little, Brown and Company, was caught off guard and had to hastily reprint the book in massive quantities.

Filled with nearly 300 photographs of President Obama, his family, staff, and other officials, depicting everything from private moments to grand public events, many of these images have never before been published.

The book features an introduction by Obama himself, as well as Souza's explanatory notes and anecdotes about the images, which offer important insights and help to contextualize the photographs, which span the entirety of Obama's two terms.

What struck me most, however, is that every page consistently reveals three overriding things: the mutual trust and respect that Obama and Souza shared, which enabled the creation of these images; Souza's talent for timing and composition, which goes well beyond standard photojournalism; and finally, a great sense of nostalgia. While the Obama years were of course complex in terms of the social and political impact of his historic presidency, from today's vantage point it all looks extraordinarily different, and way too far in the past.


Purchase Book

Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza. Little, Brown and Companay, 2017.
Obama: An Intimate Portrait by Pete Souza. Little, Brown and Company, 2017.

The book was also published in a special edition, which is signed by Pete Souza, stamp numbered, and enclosed in an illustrated cloth slipcase with an 8 × 10-inch print of “44” and First Lady Michelle Obama dancing at their first Governors Ball.


Obama: An Intimate Portrait, Special Edition, by Pete Souza. Little, Brown and Company, 2017.



Laura M. André received her PhD in art history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and taught photo history at the University of New Mexico before leaving academia to work with photobooks. She is the manager of photo-eye's book division.