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photo-eye Gallery Michael Kenna – Also On View Article by Alexandra Jo photo-eye Gallery currently has six of Kenna’s photographs on display, as a companion to Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes. The delicacy of Kenna’s unique photographic sensibility is particularly apparent. His atmospheric images present the world through a captivating perspective that offers both mystery and stillness.

Works by Michael Kenna installed at photo-eye Gallery alongside Reuben Wu's Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes

Across his extensive career, Michael Kenna’s photographs contain a precise balance between the ethereal and corporeal. Through his subtle manipulation of relationships between airy white and rich black tones, his work embodies unexpected visual contrasts that lay just this side of the surreal. These subtle variations on light and darkness bring a particular harmony to his tranquil compositions. There is an open quality to the work that never feels too heavy or dark, though the images are believably tangible. The meditative lens through which Kenna looks at the world feels consistent, elegant, and profoundly calm in the visual language of his photography.


Michael Kenna, Swan Song, Prague, Czech Republic, 1990, Silver Gelatin Print, 8 x 8 inches, Edition of 40, $3,000

In a quote from the forthcoming Des Oiseaux, Kenna states “In all my work, there is an underlying theme of memory, time, change, atmospheres that seem related to place." This idea speaks to that consistency of vision. Regardless of subject, Kenna’s photographs feel tied to a place, the particular light, the angle of a roof, or the curve of a branch; the singular feeling of one moment in one particular space. Kenna rarely photographs people, but instead looks for serene places in the world that the viewer can inhabit vicariously through viewing the images.

Michael Kenna, Four Birds, St. Nazaire, France, 2000, Silver Gelatin Print, 8 x8  inches, Edition of 40, $3,500

photo-eye Gallery currently has six of Kenna’s photographs on display, as a companion to Reuben Wu’s solo exhibition, Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes. Wu’s saturated, sci-fi neon color palate in his photographs of monumental landscapes and Kenna’s contemplative black and white images of more intimate natural spaces offer two very different ways to see and document spaces and moments in time. However, the contrasting works complement one another,— bright vs. soft, bold vs. subtle. The delicacy of Kenna’s unique photographic sensibility becomes particularly apparent. His atmospheric images present the world through a captivating perspective that offers both mystery and stillness.

Additional Works on View by Michael Kenna





New Books by Michael Kenna



Korea - Part 1.
Photographs and text by Michael Kenna.

Gallery K.O.N.G., Seoul, South Korea, 2019. In English & Korean. 64 pp., 55 black-and-white illustrations, 7¾x10½".

This exquisite book of Kenna's South Korean work is an important addition to the Kenna oeuvre. Because of its lack of distribution, Korea is likely to become collectible upon going out-of-print. Limited copies are available. Backorders will be filled in the order in which they are received as this may sell out quickly.

Hardbound: $95.00 – Order Copies
» Read the Review by Carlo Brady




Beyond Architecture.
Photographs by Michael Kenna.
Text by Yvonne Meyer-Lohr.

Prestel, Lakewood, 2019. In English. 384 pp., 310 duotone illustrations, 9½x11½"

A stunning selection of black-and-white photographs taken by Michael Kenna over the past forty-five years.

Hardbound: $80.00

» Pre-Order Copies
   Due, October 2019



All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com

Book Of The Week Aporia Photographs by Andrew Waits Reviewed by Jake Bartman “Andrew Waits’ photobook Aporia dissects the power dynamics that undergird America’s new urbanization. Its black-and-white images move from portraits of soon-to-be-demolished homes and urban homelessness to shots of sleek skyscrapers that reflect stratocumulus clouds. Taken together, these images explore how a changing urban landscape affects its population. Waits’ work also asks how city-dwellers can best understand certain kinds of oppression. In this sense, Aporia’s project is to seek a new urban epistemology.” — Jake Bartman

Aporia. By Andrew Waits.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=ZH851
Aporia  
Photographs by Andrew Waits

Dalpine, Madrid, Spain, 2018.
112 pp., 44 black-and-white illustrations, 9¼×12½".

One after effect of the Great Recession has been the reversal of a half-century’s trend toward suburbanization. “Suburban sprawl, that seemingly inexorable, inevitable spreading of the population to the outer edges of metropolitan areas, may well be over in the United States,” observed land use theorist John McIlwain as early as 2012. Faced with new barriers to home ownership and stable employment, people—especially young people— have spent the last decade flocking to cities. Now, more than 82 percent of Americans call urban areas home.

Andrew Waits’ photobook Aporia, which was released last year to plaudits including a 2018 Fiebre Dummy Book Award, dissects the power dynamics that undergird America’s new urbanization. Its black-and-white images move from portraits of soon-to-be-demolished homes and urban homelessness to shots of sleek skyscrapers that reflect stratocumulus clouds. Taken together, these images explore how a changing urban landscape affects its population. Waits’ work also asks how city-dwellers can best understand certain kinds of oppression. In this sense, Aporia’s project is to seek a new urban epistemology.


Aporia. By Andrew Waits.


Aporia. By Andrew Waits.




The dreamlike manner with which the photographer’s lens floats from subject to subject and place to place owes a debt to the French philosopher Guy Debord, whose Critique of Separation Waits cites at the book’s conclusion. Aporia’s movement calls to mind Debord’s concept of the dérive, or “drift.” First theorized by Debord in the mid-1950s, to drift is to wander, in an unstructured way, the urban landscape. It is an aspect of psychogeography, which aims to study the “specific effects of the geographical environment (whether consciously organized or not) on the emotions and behaviors of individuals.” In particular, the dérive is a way of exploring how a city is structured to control or confine its population.

Aporia. By Andrew Waits.
Part of Aporia’s interest derives from the tension between this drifting approach and the book’s narrative structure. Aporia has four sections that trace the changes occurring in an archetypical American city. In the first section, we’re shown several urban-dwellers—among them, a person in a well-worn coat, and another huddled among bags of possessions—alongside images of a city in the early phases of redevelopment.

In the third section, we see inhabitants of a different sort: the back of a businessman’s head, or a group of young men in button-down shirts and ties. By this point, the city has transformed into an assemblage of glassy buildings and electrical components.

Aporia. By Andrew Waits.
Aporia. By Andrew Waits.

It is the book’s second section, documenting the city in transition, which sets Aporia apart. Here, Waits takes dichotomies like classical vs. modern, highbrow vs. lowbrow, and organic vs. synthetic, and pushes their opposition to extremes. In one image, a crumpled plastic fence forms an ellipse around an empty plot of earth; in another, the capital of a Corinthian column, and an arch in bas relief, lie fallen beside a sidewalk. By turns mordant and earnest, each of these photographs is taut with paradox, examining the ways in which old and new inform, undermine, and reinforce each other. Ultimately, we’re asked to consider how this interplay affects a city’s inhabitants.

Aporia. By Andrew Waits.


Still, Aporia would fall short of excellence had not Waits balanced the book’s narrative arc with a conceit: a series of images, scattered throughout each section, of dancers emerging from, or disappearing into, a pitch-black background. These images’ vibrancy, and their varied placement, pose a self-conscious challenge to the book’s structure. Aporia suggests that while the impressions Debord sought to uncover via dérive aren’t enough to understand the shifting urban landscape, so narrative—confronted with the city’s perpetual interplay of past, present, and future—also falls short.

Aporia. By Andrew Waits.

Aporia’s aim is to explore the overlap between different ways of knowing, in a bid to unravel how power acts in a changing city. The term aporia refers to a state of puzzlement, so it isn’t a surprise that in the end, we’re left with questions, rather than answers. Thanks to Waits’ work, however, such questions should at least be better formed.


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Aporia. By Andrew Waits.

Jake Bartman is a writer and journalist living in Santa Fe. You can contact him at jbartman15@gmail.com.

photo-eye Gallery Behind the Image:
Reuben Wu's LN 0377
Article and Interview by Alexandra Jo Wu’s approach is ephemeral and leaves no lasting detrimental effect on the land. His work is more about pointing to a sense of compressed time, using light and long-exposure photography to mark and record a transitory human presence in the landscape, inviting viewers to think about humanity’s place in the vastness of our planet’s history.

Reuben Wu, LN0377 installed at photo-eye Gallery for Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes
Anyone familiar with the American west is also aware of the presence of petroglyphs, or prehistoric carvings in the surface of rocks and landmasses, smattered across the landscape. These esoteric signs, including waving lines, spirals, circles, and arrows, have no clear message attached to them, as any original meaning has been obscured, shed, lost through time and change. Today these marks punctuate the presence of an ancient humanity; a lasting, archaic declaration of “I was here.” Petroglyphs compress time in a way that makes me feel small within the span of years that stretch between my own body’s existence and the hands that carved them. And yet, I simultaneously feel a connection to the whole arc of my species’ history. This is the very same sensation I get when viewing photographs by Reuben Wu.

Wu uses man-made lights attached to drones to illuminate monumental landscapes found in locations spread across the world, in gestures that parallel both the ancient symbols of petroglyphs and the explorations of the land art movement in the 1970’s. He uses contemporary technology to interact with the landscape in a way that flows in continuity with the eternal human impulse to document our presence. However, Wu’s approach is ephemeral and leaves no lasting detrimental effect on the land. The photograph becomes the lasting mark. And for Wu, the actual symbols drawn in the air by the drones have no specific meaning in and of themselves. The work is more about pointing to that sense of compressed time, using light and long-exposure photography to mark and record a transitory human presence in the landscape, inviting viewers to think about humanity’s place in the vastness of our planet’s history.

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Wu about LN 0377, one of the first images in which he used drones and light in this unique way:

Reuben Wu, LN 0377 (Time present and time past Are both perhaps present in future III), 
Archival Pigment Print, 38 x 50 inches, Edition of 3, $5,000 (Unframed)


“That image [LN0377] was from the first attempt at doing an idea which I’d had in my mind for a couple of years prior. Back when I was thinking of what this project could be, I wanted to light all of these vast landscapes under the light of the drones. I was pretty excited about the maneuvers that the drone could do…one was called “the orbit” where you could lock the position and path of the drone (having it fly in a circle automatically) but control the speed and radius at which it flies. I thought, if I put a light on that I could move the light around the landscape in this magical, impossible way. I hadn’t tested this technique until that point.

Reuben Wu photographing on location while making
work for Lux Noctis
I was in a place called Blue Canyon on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona, which is a place where you need permission and a guide to have access to the land. If you go there without a guide then you’ll be escorted off the grounds. That place has this sacredness to it, which I don’t feel in lots of other places. So I spent the afternoon and night with a guide just walking around, shooting these pictures. This image was either the last or second to last photo that I shot. It worked really well…honestly better than I expected.

One of the things I love about this project is the fact that there is tension between the natural textures and surfaces of the terrain and the clean geometry of the light path. I see it as kind of like my version of the land art movement. Where the land artists do their thing by touching the landscape, altering it in some way, building, changing something, I wanted to do something light-based which didn’t touch the landscape or interfere with it in a permanent way.  Obviously, it’s a noisy, annoying drone while it’s flying, but it’s not painting or carving things or leaving any lasting effect. And for me, it’s more about the light that’s cast onto the rocks than the path of light itself. The path shows how I’m intervening into the landscape, but the light that’s shown down onto the land really makes the image for me. It makes it real… that kind of lighting is impossible to create in Photoshop, it’s a real thing that’s happening.

I also see this project as speaking to something bigger than humanity. Humanity is such a tiny blip on the time-span of the planet. It speaks to something that is more based in the language of geology and the elements, like the way that a rainbow is elements of light playing with precipitation, and this very pure visual effect occurs. The light paths only exist in the photograph. You don’t see the shapes in person because your eye only sees a single point of light moving. These shapes have to be recorded with a camera to be seen, which points to the photograph and the camera being able to show what you can’t see with your eye. There is something there for me, about being able to use the camera in this way. You can only see what is in front of you one moment at a time with your eye, but using a camera in this way, you can see what’s happening over the course of a few seconds. This is expanding on the element of time and that capacity of the camera being able to show beyond what the eye can see." — Reuben Wu


Wu's solo exhibition at photo-eye Gallery, Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes, runs through November 16, 2019.


All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com

Exhibition Catalogue Available for Preorder
(Shipping Late October)

Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes: Photographs by Reuben Wu
Kris Graves Projects, Queens, New York, United States, 2019. In English. 30 pp., 16 color plates, 8½x9" 






Book Of The Week Gerontion Photographs by Christian Michael Filardo Reviewed by Sarah Bradley “Much of what Filardo captures is outdated or broken down—the most timely items being a can of La Croix and a bottle of Gatorade, but these two are used up. The tight vertical frames show small and specific views that feel suspended in time. A pair of checkerboard pants lays on a dizzying tiled floor, a silvery dragon sticker gleams on the side of a rusted car, bits of red pop in a small apartment kitchen. While the perspective is clear, the images feel impersonal, which stands in contrast to the book’s writing.” — Sarah Bradley


Gerontion. By Christian Michael Filardo.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=ZH898
Gerontion  
Photographs and text by Christian Michael Filardo

Dianne Weinthal, Los Angeles, US, 2019.
60 pp., 34 four-color illustrations, 6¾x10".

I have been thinking for a while about this review and how I will approach it, that I will approach it like I approach every other review I write. Of course, I didn’t completely do that. I failed at first to do the Googling that I typically do because I have an atypical proximity to this photographer. It’s enough to say that Christian Michael Filardo and I were close friends for a time when they lived in Santa Fe, but we haven’t talked since they moved in the summer of 2018. This, maybe, gives me some additional context. I know the Brad who is mentioned in the text and recognize two of the three faceless people depicted. I know this, but it is not illuminating. I say all of this because though this book is deeply personal, it is also about an internal state that I couldn’t have traction on, regardless of what I know and what I do not.

The cover of Gerontion is beautifully designed; the red printed dust jacket unfolds to a red image printed on the inside. It feels a bit like a chapbook. Indeed, it takes its name from a T.S. Eliot poem, reprinting the Shakespeare epigraph that starts it on the book’s cover. The dream and pull between youth and age mentioned in the sparse lines are themes demonstrated throughout. It even appears in the book’s signature, which includes a child-like holdover of “Age 27” between the name and date.

GerontionBy Christian Michael Filardo.
The images, shot with flash and existing within a blown-out flatness, can be interestingly confusing. Filardo’s eye is slyly associative, and the photographs feel most concerned with showcasing his odd discoveries. Much of what Filardo captures is outdated or broken down—the most timely items being a can of La Croix and a bottle of Gatorade, but these two are used up. The tight vertical frames show small and specific views that feel suspended in time. A pair of checkerboard pants lays on a dizzying tiled floor, a silvery dragon sticker gleams on the side of a rusted car, bits of red pop in a small apartment kitchen. While the perspective is clear, the images feel impersonal, which stands in contrast to the book’s writing. Consequently, it is also worth getting to know the book from just the photographs, letting them breathe without the emotional crowding of the text.

GerontionBy Christian Michael Filardo.

The first poem enhances a sense of narrative in the early images, but as the book progresses, narrative becomes less apparent and we are left with feeling. The stream of consciousness poems have a hazy-minded logic and a preoccupation with death. They are heavy in the way that so many young men I’ve known have told me with narrowed eyes, “I don’t expect to make it to 30.” Every one of them did. The solipsism of sadness bounces off of mundane action to create a very specific humor. It is a strong voice of slight depiction. Momentary feelings are made clear, but little is revealed.

GerontionBy Christian Michael Filardo.
While the associative qualities that brought the lines of the poems together are opaque, the associations between images become more overt. About halfway through the book, the parallels between images hit a high pitch, so much so as to cloud their distinct subject matter; what is notable is that they look like each other. I am brought back to those lines of text mentioning Brad: “I could never tell you how much it meant to me, the trust. Putting faith into something you know will let you down. Brad calls me to tell me he’s sorry he’s forgotten to be in touch. I’m sorry I’ve forgotten to be in touch too.” I am reminded of those states where the urge to prolong and examine the emotion overtakes the need to mitigate it. These are places of free association where traces of the things you can’t stop thinking about surface everywhere. The act of connection is clear even if the significance is not.

As I sit down to write this, I read a music review and find uncanny associations to my own patterns of thought. The reviewer excerpts a quotation from The Egg and The Chicken by Clarice Lispector about how the most important part of knowing something is what you do not know. I have a growing affinity for the complexity of this kind of knowing. There is much I don’t know about this book, but what I do understand is its mood, an interior place of looking outward.


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GerontionBy Christian Michael Filardo.

Sarah Bradley is a multidisciplinary artist whose practice spans writing, audio, sculpture, installation, and costume. Her writing on photobooks has appeared in photo-eye, IMA, Phroom and Southwest Contemporary. Bradley is a co-founder of the Santa Fe art space Etiquette, a Creative Director at Meow Wolf and a co-host of the Too Sick podcast.
sebradley.com

photo-eye Gallery Reuben Wu
Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes
Exhibition CatalogueArticle by Alexandra JoA catalogue of Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes, published by Kris Graves Projects, will accompany the physical exhibition at photo-eye Gallery, which runs through November 16, 2019. With these photographs Reuben Wu slices moments out of time, simultaneously pointing to past and future by slowly exposing the present.

Reuben Wu, LN 0309, Archival Pigment Print,
15 x 20 inches, Edition of 10, $950 unframed

Last Friday Reuben Wu’s solo exhibition Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes opened at photo-eye Gallery. Mysterious and captivating in both process and aesthetics, Wu’s work involves illuminating nocturnal landscapes with lights attached to drones. The resulting images are otherworldly, depicting land and water in saturated color, bold and slightly surreal, crowned with the ethereal glow of cryptic symbols drawn in the air with light.


Reuben Wu, AE 1144, Archival Pigment Print, 15 x 20 inches, Edition of 10, $950 unframed

Wu’s photography has a unique way of sliding in and out of our typical perceptions of time. The monumental landscapes that he carefully chooses to photograph feel ancient, permanent and unchanging in a way that is deceptively tangible. However, the simple, esoteric language of symbols created by the drones’ clean light is temporary, appearing and disappearing at Wu's command. The precise movements of the drone lights echo the minimal aesthetics of contemporary technology and feel futuristic against the age of the landmasses beneath. By juxtaposing these short, luminous bursts of man-made light and the enduring terrestrial stillness below them, Wu reveals to the viewer that each of these works documents a singular temporal fragment. With these photographs, Wu slices moments out of time, simultaneously pointing to past and future by slowly exposing the present.

Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes
Photographs by Reuben Wu
Kris Graves Projects, Queens, New York, 2019
In English, 30 pp., 16 color plates, 8.5 x 9 inches
$25.00

A catalogue of Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes, published by Kris Graves Projects, will accompany the physical exhibition at photo-eye Gallery, which runs through November 16, 2019. The thirty-page photo book will feature 16 color plates including all of the work in the exhibition, plus select images from Wu’s newest bodies of work.

» PRE-ORDER THE CATALOGUE
 Shipping: October 2019
$25.00 Softcover 

• • • • •




Lux Noctis 
Photographs by Reuben Wu. 
Text by Geoff Manaugh
Kris Graves Projects, New York, USA, 2018. 
48 pp., 23 color illustrations, 12x13". 

Signed copies available!
Out of Print

Near Fine condition (slight imperfections to the cloth and cover illustration)

2 Copies left in stock, orders will be processed on a first-come-first-served basis.




All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com

Current Exhibition

Reuben Wu: 
Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes 
On view through November 16, 2019




Book Of The Week The Mind and the Hand Photographs by Lee Friedlander Reviewed by Blake Andrews A slipcased set of six paperback books, The Mind and the Hand presents the photographer’s intimate portraits of six of his best friends taken over the past five decades. The subjects, each presented in their own separate volume, comprise a veritable who's who of one of America's most fertile periods in photography.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DT431
The Mind and the Hand. By Lee Friedlander.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DT431
The Mind and the Hand  
Photographs by Lee Friedlander

Eakins Press Foundation, 2019. In English.
240 pp., 191 illustrations, 8½x9".

Lee Friedlander turned 85 this summer. It's an age when most folks begin to slow down. Maybe a vacation would be in order? A day at the beach? Or a trip to the countryside? Nope. None of that for Lee Friedlander. Incredibly, his pace of production seems to be picking up in recent years. In the 32 months since I last reviewed one of his books for photo-eye —the wonderful monograph Western Landscapes— he has published six new titles. There are at least two more in the pipeline for this fall.

The subject at hand might count as six books on its own. It's the gorgeous box-set The Mind And The Hand, published this spring by Eakins Press. Tucked in a handsome clothbound slipcase is a set of six lean paperbacks, each one focusing on a close photographer friend of Lee. Friedlander kept high company, and these friends represent something of a “Who's Who” in late 20th-century photoland: Richard Benson, William Christenberry, William Eggleston, Walker Evans, John Szarkowski, and Garry Winogrand.

 William Christenberry, New York City, 2009. By Lee Friedlander.
Friedlander photographed each of them over the course of a few decades, a prodigious feat for any photographer. But for Friedlander, they were just six more subjects plucked from an inexhaustible, and irresistible, world. Six more boxes to fill in his seemingly boundless oeuvre. In fact, Friedlander's longevity can probably be measured against the lifespans of his colleagues. With one exception (Eggleston) he's outlived all the people in these books.

Of course, it's not quite true that these subjects were interchangeable with other material. These were close friends, presumably more meaningful than the utility poles, chain link, and car mirrors of other projects. At least one would hope so, although, who really knows? It's difficult to tell from the photographic approach, which for Friedlander rarely varies: direct, playful, bold, and ever-present. And the notoriously reticent Friedlander doesn't offer any opinion. Instead, each booklet is prefaced with a brief paragraph written by the subject.

Walker Evans, New York City, 1958. By Lee Friedlander.
The moments Friedlander captured with friends are sometimes quite intimate. There are snapshots of family dinners, weddings, and social gatherings, as well as more personal, private moments. Taken together, they are the small incidents that form the fabric of any deep relationship. In most friendships these moments pass unnoticed. The difference here is that Friedlander always had a camera handy. Always! And so now, some decades after the fact, we get to reap the harvest. It was worth the wait.

Garry Winogrand, New York City, 1979. By Lee Friedlander.
Within each small book, the photos slowly —generally chronologically— reveal their subject's personality. In many of the Eggleston photos he appears to be sloshed, or perhaps just tired. Christenberry looks invariably contemplative, often staring down as if in a moment of silent prayer. Richard Benson has a defiant gaze, as if asking the world, "Hey what're YOU looking at, buddy?" The life of the party was Winogrand. In nearly every photo he looks jolly and charming, with the wry grin of someone who's just remembered a good joke. For me, his book is the highlight, presenting at least a dozen unseen candids of the late master. Of course, photos can lie. Who knows how close any of these portraits are to the truth? Let's just say they hint strongly in certain directions.

Richard Benson, Memphis, Tennessee, 1990 (with John Benson). By Lee Friedlander.
Tying all the books together is the title, The Mind And The Hand, taken from the Richard Benson quotation inserted inside the case: "This remarkable thing that we carry around inside our heads is the most complicated known object that we are aware of…The hand does its work in response…and can outlive its maker. Even though the mind once stood behind it, the physical thing is all that remains." It's a nod to photography's two central ingredients, and also to the nonstop hourglass of life, and of friendships, and good books. Will the ticking clock ever catch up to Friedlander? Not in the foreseeable future.

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William Eggleston, Memphis, Tennessee, 1990. By Lee Friedlander.


Blake Andrews is a photographer based in Eugene, OR. He writes about photography at blakeandrews.blogspot.com.


photo-eye Gallery Reuben Wu Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes Opening this Friday, August 30 at photo-eye Gallery Wu's photography hovers somewhere between the mythic and the surreal, between dream and memory, with an undulating sense of temporality slipping between the ancient past and the imagined future. Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes runs from August 30th to November 16th, 2019 with an opening reception Friday, August 30 from 5-7pm corresponding with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Railyard Arts District.



photo-eye Gallery is excited to announce Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes, a solo exhibition of photography by Reuben Wu. Simultaneously reminiscent of the slick, neon glow of sci-fi aesthetics and the cryptic symbolic language of ancient petroglyphs, Wu’s work is clean, yet mysterious. His photography hovers somewhere between the mythic and the surreal, between dream and memory, with an undulating sense of temporality slipping between the ancient past and the imagined future. Light and land are entwined equally at the center of Wu’s practice. By affixing lights to drones and using them to illuminate select parts of the landscapes he photographs, Wu draws precise geometric marks that hover in the air like beacons, harbingers, and signs. His work is concise, yet versatile in concept, offering new ways to approach the human relationship to nature, technology, and the overlay between past, present, and future.

Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes runs from August 30th to November 16th, 2019 with an opening reception Friday, August 30 from 5-7pm corresponding with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Railyard Arts District.

Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes installation view

Aeroglyphs & Other Nocturnes installation view

ABOUT THE ARTWORK

In his visual work, Reuben Wu is driven not just by the urge to create imagery, but also by a desire to explore new places as if they were unknown territory. He is constantly open to serendipity and has an eye for the unnoticed and the hidden. Wu states: “Photographs, like music, can create an echo of a time and a place. To me, my images are more than pictures. They are fragments of memory and imagination.”

Wu’s work encompasses an ongoing series of large temporary geometries traced by light-carrying drones in space. A nod to the Land Art movement, he views these works as non-invasive interventions in the landscape where the medium is simply the trace of light over the earth.

Reuben Wu at AIPAD 2019, photograph by Anne Kelly.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Reuben Wu is a British photographer, born in 1975 in Liverpool. He's also a violinist, keyboardist, DJ and music producer for the popular electronic band Ladytron. His work has been featured in National Geographic, Wired Magazine, and most recently in Photo District News’ print and online publication. He was the recipient of the 2018 Graphis Award (Automotive Category) and his series Lux Noctis was a winning entry in the 2017 PDN Photo Annual. photo-eye Gallery debuted their representation of Wu’s work earlier this year at Photo LA and in a solo exhibition booth at AIPAD, NYC.





All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com