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Books In Stock at photo-eye: Signed Three books on sale from Darren Almond, Gilles Bonnecarrère and Gilles Bonnecarrère.
The Civil Dawns
Photographs by Darren Almond
Torch Press

Sale copies are imperfect with bumped corners
$63.00 — SALE $50.40

"British artist Darren Almond has been known for his works using variety of media, including sculpture, films as well as photography. This The Civil Dawns consists of 2 photographic series. 'Civil Dawn@Giverny' is a series of photographs taken in the Claude Monet’s garden at Giverny in the winter and summer, while 'Civil Dawn@Mt. Hiei' photographed foggy Mt. Hiei. Images of both series are captured by exposing to the momentary light of the break of dawn.

Book Review Carpoolers By Alejandro Cartagena Reviewed by Colin Pantall Alejandro Cartagena made his Carpoolers pictures between 2011 and 2012. It’s a series of Mexican workers getting to and from work in the back of pick-up trucks. They sit, they lie, they sleep surrounded by the tools of their trades in trucks that are isolated from above.

Carpoolers. By Alejandro Cartagena.
Self-Publish, 2014.
 
Carpoolers
Reviewed by Colin Pantall

Carpoolers
Photographs by Alejandro Cartagena
Self-Published, 2014. 112 pp., 110 color illustrations, 8½x13¼".


Alejandro Cartagena made his Carpoolers pictures between 2011 and 2012. It’s a series of Mexican workers getting to and from work in the back of pick-up trucks. They sit, they lie, they sleep surrounded by the tools of their trades in trucks that are isolated from above.

photo-eye Gallery Interview & Portfolio: Dornith Doherty on Archiving Eden photo-eye gallery is pleased to announce a new portfolio titled Archiving Eden by Photographer’s Showcase artist Dornith Doherty. In this project, Maas images the consequence of time and atmosphere on photographic film – presenting the evidence of an object, image, and moment reduced to an abstract color field. photo-eye Gallery's Anne Kelly talks to Doherty about her work.

Prairie IV — Dornith Doherty

photo-eye Gallery is pleased to announce the addition of Dornith Doherty’s Archiving Eden, to the Photographer's Showcase. In Archiving Eden, Doherty photographs in seed banks across the globe, exploring everything from small private institutions to some of the world's largest and most comprehensive vaults. In this project Doherty blends science, conservation, and artistry by collaborating with biologists and governments to investigate complex issues while creating poetic imagery, including both straight documentation of vaults and institutions as well as digital collages utilizing onsite x-ray technology. The Photographer's Showcase portfolio focuses on Doherty's delicate and detailed digital collages, photographs that echo fine lucida pencil drawings or early cyanotypes, aiding in the formal blend between history, preservation, and photography. —Anne Kelly

Kangaroo Grass, 2014 — Dornith Doherty


Anne Kelly:     What inspired your ambitious project Archiving Eden?

Dornith Doherty:     The stewardship of natural resources and the challenging complexity of human interaction with our world are of utmost importance to me. Prior to Archiving Eden, my focus was on the cultural aspects of contemporary managed landscapes in national parks, historic gardens, and nature preserves (Temporal Screens and Altered Terrain); and later, the politically and environmentally contested landscape of the Rio Grande river valley (Burnt Water/Agua Quemada). When I read John Seabrook’s article about the opening of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in the New Yorker magazine, (Annals of Agriculture, Sowing for the Apocalypse), I was immediately impressed by the simultaneously pessimistic and optimistic aspects of a global seed vault built to save the word’s botanical life from catastrophic events.

Dornith Doherty at Svalbard Global Seed Vault
AK:     You have photographed in seed banks all over the world from private to government run. Where did you start and how did you gain access?

DD:     I started by photographing the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas. You can’t imagine how moving it was to see individual volunteers cleaning, counting, and packaging tiny seeds by hand in order to send them to two of the most important seed banks in the world — the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the Millennium Seed Bank in England. When confronted by large problems such as climate change and extinction of species we face today, sometimes it seems that individual effort can’t make a difference. While photographing the seed banks, it became apparent that by saving these seeds, individuals and institutions were helping to ensure the survival of entire plant species. It was a profoundly moving experience. Early in the project, I had the very good fortune to work with Dr. Dave Ellis, a research scientist at the United States National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, and now head of the International Potato Center in Peru. His support and collaboration made it possible to expand Archiving Eden to include seed banks in England, Norway, Russia, the Netherlands, Italy, Australia, Brazil, and the Svalbard Global Seed Vault.

Australia, 2014 — Dornith Doherty

AK:     You started by making “traditional” photographs inside of the seed banks and eventually began capturing images using onsite x-ray equipment at the facilities. Please talk about this transition. 

DD:     The dual nature of Archiving Eden emerged very early in the project. At the second bank I photographed, (the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins, Colorado), I asked permission to use their research x-ray equipment in order to make digital x-rays of seeds and research plants from their collection. Upon return to my studio in Texas I used the images as the basis for a suite of collages, which allowed me to address, in a more openly poetic way, my wonder in encountering a massive vault filled with an archive of life. The photographs and the x-ray collages are linked; they are captured at the same time and place, and express two sides of the quest to preserve life.

Seed Head II, 2010 — Dornith Doherty
AK:     What are your thought on the intersection of science and art in Archiving Eden?

The innovative discursive space created by artistic and scientific collaboration enhances the creative process for me. When I was working at the NCGRP, I focused on the collections of diverse seeds saved for agrobiodiversity, and tissue samples of cloned plants used for global agriculture. The cross-disciplinary dialogue with Dave Ellis, who was Plant Physiologist and Lead Curator of the Plant Genetic Resources Preservation Program at the time, created an opportunity to expand the project in surprising and unanticipated directions, thereby creating a nuanced view of this important and timely subject. His research into the genetic diversity of corn became a basis for several collages.

AK:     Your images document a very important story, but are also graphic and visually pleasing. How do you balance aesthetics and intent in your photographs?

DD:     Thank you! One of the aspects I love about photography is the element of surprise that may arise out of recognizing a confluence of visual phenomena that, when captured, resolves into a visually compelling and meaningful image. By capturing images in the field and then taking them back to the studio to complete them, contemplation time is introduced into the process, which helps me to edit and create work that reflects my concerns. At the moment, in contemporary photography and art criticism, there is a trend in which beauty is somehow suspect. In my work, at first glance, viewers may not recognize the layers of meaning because of that train of thought and may dismiss my work. However, it is my hope that beauty may make viewers pause and consider what I’m trying to say about extinction and survival, wild and agricultural biodiversity, recycling of genetic information, empirical knowledge, and scientific intervention such as suspended animation in living materials.

Waning I, 2014 — Dornith Doherty
Dornith Doherty at work in the Netherlands

AK:     Please share a story about something unexpected that you discovered in the process of making this work.

DD:     Hahaha! This whole project has been an encounter with the unexpected. Who would think you could make a project out of seed banks? Before 2008, I did not know what a seed bank was. As I’ve worked at the various institutions around the world, each bank has stories of close calls and species surviving against the odds. In this era of climate change and extinction, those unexpected successes give me hope. One of my favorite stories is a small plant I saw at the Millennium Seed Bank in England. This plant was sprouted from seeds collected by a sea captain during the early 1800s, and the plant was previously thought to be extinct. So, a sea captain from 200 years ago saved a species.


View the complete Archiving Eden portfolio

For more information or to purchase a print, please contact Anne Kelly 505-988-5150 x121 or anne@photoeye.com

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Andreas Trogisch Photographer Andreas Trogisch selects The Rendering Eye edited by Regula Bochsler & Philipp Sarasin as photo-eye Book of the Week.
The Rendering Eye. Edited by Regula Bochsler &
 Philipp Sarasin. Edition Patrick Frey, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from photographer Andreas Trogisch The Rendering Eye edited by Regula Bochsler & Philipp Sarasin from Edition Patrick Frey.

Book Review It Will Be a Better Day By JeongMee Yoon Reviewed by Christopher J Johnson A picture, we are told, is worth a thousand words. This may be true, but it might be more accurate to say that photography is best when it defies words. We look to an image to articulate for us what cannot be spoken, what stifles us in the realm of language. It is photography’s great ability to contain a deeper sense of joy, sorrow, fear, and the human condition (as well as nature’s great unwavering beauty), that makes it a medium like no other.

It Will Be a Better Day. By JeongMee Yoon.
PinknBlue, 2014.
 
It Will Be a Better Day
Reviewed by Christopher J. Johnson

It Will Be a Better Day: Korean Modern Short Stories
Photographs by JeongMee Yoon.
PinknBlue, 2014. 80 pp., 16 color illustrations, 10x7½".

A picture, we are told, is worth a thousand words. This may be true, but it might be more accurate to say that photography is best when it defies words. We look to an image to articulate for us what cannot be spoken, what stifles us in the realm of language. It is photography’s great ability to contain a deeper sense of joy, sorrow, fear, and the human condition (as well as nature’s great unwavering beauty), that makes it a medium like no other. Conversely, it is the aim of the written word to articulate our thoughts for us, to lend to us a voice that is solid, well put, and on the human level.

Books In Stock at photo-eye: Signed Three signed titles from Max Pinckers, Graham MacIndoe and Guy Tillim.
Will They Sing Like Raindrops Or Leave Me Thristy
By Max Pinckers
$100 — Purchase Signed Book

The new book from The Fourth Wall photographer Max Pinckers. Copies on Amazon start at $140.

"The work revolves around the expression of love in India, including its problematics and wondrous beauty. A key subject throughout the series are the Love Commandos, an organisation who help young runaway couples from harassment and prosecution by their disapproving families. One such couple started their relationship by secretly talking to each other across their rooftops. This inspired me to stage an image based on this event." Max Pinckers in Rooms

Book Review Italia O Italia By Frederico Clavarino Reviewed by Colin Pantall I went on holiday with my family to Crete this summer. We spent most of our time on the beach and in the sea, but the day before we left we visited the Heraklion Archaeological Museum. There are sections dedicated to Greek and Roman art but it’s the Minoan relics that are the real treasures.

Italia O Italia. By Frederico Clavarino.
Akina, 2014.
 
Italia O Italia
Reviewed by Colin Pantall

Italia O Italia
Photographs by Frederico Clavarino
Akina, 2014. 136 pp., 66 color illustrations, 7½x10".


I went on holiday with my family to Crete this summer. We spent most of our time on the beach and in the sea, but the day before we left we visited the Heraklion Archaeological Museum. There are sections dedicated to Greek and Roman art but it’s the Minoan relics that are the real treasures.

The Minoans ruled Crete before the Greeks and the Romans took over. They made amazing art. They put it on their walls, on their pots, on every little knick-knack you can imagine. It is glorious stuff and it stands the test of time. Look at their decorated plates and you see where Picasso got his ideas from. Check out the clay vases and suddenly the Constructivists don’t seem quite so bold. The variety and dynamism of their Leaping Bulls and wriggling squid are really a sight to behold.

photo-eye Gallery Interview & Portfolio: Rita Maas – 20th Century Plastics photo-eye gallery is pleased to announce a new portfolio titled 20th Century Plastics by Photographer’s Showcase artist Rita Maas. In this project, Maas images the consequence of time and atmosphere on photographic film – presenting the evidence of an object, image, and moment reduced to an abstract color field. photo-eye Gallery's Lucas Shaffer asked Maas to tell us more about this series.
Untitled 14.05 (1989 - 2014)  – Rita Maas

photo-eye gallery is pleased to announce a new portfolio titled 20th Century Plastics by Photographer’s Showcase artist Rita Maas. In this project, Maas images the consequence of time and atmosphere on photographic film – presenting the evidence of an object, image, and moment reduced to an abstract color field. These vibrant plastic windows, reminiscent of stained glass, serve as statements about photography’s ephemeral nature, an elegy for its chemical history, and perhaps hope for its future. All prints are produced with archival pigments on cotton rag paper, and come in three editioned sizes.

Video A Year's Worth of Photobooks In Just Over 2 Minutes In celebration of World Photobook Day, we present a year's worth of photobooks from our online catalog at photoeye.com.
In celebration of World Photobook Day, we present a year's worth of photobooks from our online catalog at photoeye.com.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Andrea Botto Photographer Andrea Botto selects Amc2 Journal Issue 9 — Amore e Piombo: The Photography of Extremes in 1970s Italy edited and with an essay by Roger Hargreaves & Federica Chiocchetti as Book of the Week.
Amc2 Journal Issue 9 — Amore e Piombo: 
The Photography of Extremes in 1970s Italy 
edited and with an essay by Roger Hargreaves&
 Federica Chiocchetti. AMC Books, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from photographer Andrea Botto who has selected Amc2 Journal Issue 9 — Amore e Piombo: The Photography of Extremes in 1970s Italy edited and with an essay by Roger Hargreaves & Federica Chiocchetti from AMC Books.

Book Review The Epilogue By Laia Abril Reviewed by Adam Bell As a journalist and documentarian, sometimes the most important thing to remember is to let your subject speak. Photographers, and journalists, often forget this and plow ahead with a self-assurance that clouds their subject. Sometimes the best thing to do is shut up and quit the theatrics.


The Epilogue. By Laia Abril.
Dewi Lewis Publishing, 2014.
The Epilogue
Reviewed by Adam Bell

The Epilogue
Photographs by Laia Abril
Dewi Lewi Publishing, 2014. 172 pp., illustrated throughout, 7½x9¾".

As a journalist and documentarian, sometimes the most important thing to remember is to let your subject speak. Photographers, and journalists, often forget this and plow ahead with a self-assurance that clouds their subject. Sometimes the best thing to do is shut up and quit the theatrics. From the multimedia presentation A Bad Day to the 2012 zine Thinspiration, Laia Abril has explored the devastating social and personal effects of eating disorders. In her latest book, The Epilogue, Abril focuses her attention on the life of one woman, Cammy Robinson, who tragically lost her life to bulimia in 2005. Striking in its restraint, The Epilogue brings Cammy to the foreground and allows her family and loved ones to tell her story. Although edited and compiled by Abril, her own images never attempt to upstage the more compelling narrative and documents from Cammy’s life. Drawing on transcribed interviews, family photographs, and documents, The Epilogue communicates the sorrow, grief and tragedy of a young woman’s passing with remarkable power and insight that linger long after the book is closed.

Books In Stock at photo-eye: Out of Print Four out of print titles from Kenro Izu, Bruce Gilden, Terri Weifenbach and Adam Fuss.

We're excited to feature a new selection of out-of-print books from our collection here at photo-eye. Due to limited availability, purchase links will put you in touch with us via email. The images in this post depict the actual books for sale. Questions? Send us an email.

Book Review Töchter By Clara Bahlsen Reviewed by Janelle Lynch Clara Bahlsen is not driven by new technologies or trends. There is nothing jarring or seductive about her images, no bones, no flesh. Photoshop is not a factor. Indeed, Töchter (Daughters) is a welcome reprieve from work that is made to shock or be the next new, cool thing.

Töchter (Daughter). By Clara Bahlsen.
Self-Publish, 2014.
 
Töchter
Reviewed by Janelle Lynch

Töchter (Daughter)
Photographs by Clara Bahlsen
Self-Published, 2014. 64 pp., 22 black & white and 22 color illustrations, 11x14¾".


Clara Bahlsen is not driven by new technologies or trends. There is nothing jarring or seductive about her images, no bones, no flesh. Photoshop is not a factor. Indeed, Töchter (Daughters) is a welcome reprieve from work that is made to shock or be the next new, cool thing. It sustains the viewer’s interest with the quiet strength of its inquiry into what it means to grow up and define one’s identity.

Born in 1979 in a small village near Hannover, Germany, Bahlsen lives and works in Berlin where she studied visual communication at the University of the Arts and photography at the Ostkreuz School for Photography. Töchter, self-published in 2013, was awarded the 10th Aenne Biermann Prize for Contemporary Photography the same year.

Book Review Dioramas By Hiroshi Sugimoto Reviewed by Karen Jenkins Standing before the glowing dioramas of New York’s American Museum of Natural History in 1974, closing one eye, Hiroshi Sugimoto saw things differently; sparking a photographic vision in the form of a career-spanning daydream. In his black and white alternate reality, those perfect specimens of bird and bear statically restaged in their ideal landscapes are brought back to life in that sweet spot in-between now and then, true and fake.

Dioramas. By Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Damiani, 2014.
 
Dioramas
Reviewed by Karen Jenkins

Dioramas
Photographs by Hiroshi Sugimoto
Damiani, 2014. 118 pp., 56 black & white illustrations, 10¼x11¼".


Standing before the glowing dioramas of New York’s American Museum of Natural History in 1974, closing one eye, Hiroshi Sugimoto saw things differently; sparking a photographic vision in the form of a career-spanning daydream. In his black and white alternate reality, those perfect specimens of bird and bear statically restaged in their ideal landscapes are brought back to life in that sweet spot in-between now and then, true and fake. In Sugimoto’s reverie, there are no fantastical mash-ups or improbable antics, as he keeps one foot planted in the real, the representational, to be found within these even-keel dramas of gentleman scientists who themselves dreamed of statuesque predators and dignified prey. Hiroshi Sugimoto: Dioramas assembles 56 of the photographer’s large-scale diorama photographs made at New York’s iconic museum and around the United States. It is the first of a new series from Damiani and Matsumoto Editions that will also showcase his series Seascapes, Theaters, Architecture and Lightning Fields.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Daniel Boetker-Smith Daniel Boetker-Smith from the Asia-Pacific Photobook Archive selects Dominion by Wawi Navarroza as photo-eye Book of the Week.
Dominion. By Wawi Navarroza.
E. Stephanian, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from Daniel Boetker-Smith from the Asia-Pacific Photobook Archive who has selected Dominion by Wawi Navarroza published by E. Stephanian.