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Book Review Sunshine Hotel Photographs by Mitch Epstein Reviewed by Blake Andrews Cass combines her poetry and photography, images of botanical and zoological specimens, and early 1900s glass plate negatives and journal excerpts by pioneering prairie ecologist Frank Shoemaker.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DT625
Sunshine Hotel. By Mitch Epstein.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DT625
Sunshine Hotel  
Photographs by Mitch Epstein

Steidl/PPP Editions, 2019. In English. 264 pp., 175 illustrations, 12x12¼".

When you’ve been making photos for as long as Mitch Epstein has —just over a half-century and counting— your archive is likely to be enormous. As time passes, previously disregarded photos take on a fresh air. New themes take shape, images are re-combined in novel ways.

Such is the inspiration behind Epstein’s latest offering Sunshine Hotel. This is a career retrospective, but with a twist. Epstein’s oeuvre has been broken down into individual photos, and then reorganized from scratch by an outside curator. The man for the job, in this case, is Andrew Roth, respected critic and photo aficionado, perhaps best known for the seminal photobook The Book of 101 Books. Tasked here with putting a fresh spin on old material, Roth passes with flying colors.

Sunshine Hotel. By Mitch Epstein.

“For a long time, I’d wanted to break my pictures out of their structured series and put them together on different terms, but I couldn’t figure out how to do it,” Epstein explained during an interview with Document Journal. “Andrew saw it clearly. He laid the groundwork for the sequencing, and broke the established order of my past chronology and projects. […] A madness builds in the book, which is intentional; every picture and placement was highly considered. That said, there is no one reading to any picture, juxtaposition of pictures, or sequence.”

Sunshine Hotel. By Mitch Epstein.
Photos stripped of context and chronology, considered only on their own merits. Such a treatment —closer in spirit to Instagram than traditional, concept-based projects— is quite liberating. Unfettered and set loose on the pages, Epstein’s photos make all sorts of exciting connections. His famous World Trade Center photo becomes less a study of American grandeur than a formal duality. It’s followed by two tracks in the snow, two roads bridging a desert chasm, then a similar road fronting a reservoir, and so on. Another short passage sequences crowd shots, transforming Epstein’s well-known photo of a grinning soldier —a Vietnam war commentary in its previous life— into yet another street study.

There are 175 such photos in the book, cleverly sequenced into 14 passages of varying length. Some of the connections are obvious, while others are more subtle. Regardless of sequence, the individual photographs are strong enough to stand on their own. There are several dozen old favorites included, and a few score more will be familiar to general photo buffs. But there is still more than enough unseen work included —roughly half the book— to entertain even the most jaded Epstein fans.

Certainly, Roth’s treatment strips Epstein’s photos of their emotional resonance. There’s none of the gut-punch power here of, say, Family Business or American Power, severe commentaries on the American dream. But for me, the trade-off is worth it. It’s nice to set aside societal issues for a moment and just enjoy photographs as photographs. If one wants to wade deeper, Sunshine Hotel also works on that level as a broad 50-year snapshot of American culture through the lens of Epstein.

Sunshine Hotel. By Mitch Epstein.

The sheer breadth of Epstein’s career comes across over the course of 175 photos. He is one of the rare photographers —like Friedlander, Soth, Meyerowitz, and some others— able to attack just about any subject with equal tenacity. Street photos, nature, portrait, monochrome, large format, event, social landscape, etc. Epstein handles all with aplomb, and just about everything is represented here.

For those keeping track, this is not the first Epstein career retrospective. Book lovers who own Recreation (2005) or Work (2007) might wonder if Sunshine Hotel has enough new material to justify the purchase. In my opinion, yes. First, this new book includes a sizable chunk of Epstein’s work from the past 12 years. Second, the reproductions are better than in either of the previous books. The color casts and awkward aspect ratio of the roughly chronological Recreation —how can that fit reasonably on any bookshelf?— have been corrected. Work was a better effort, but in comparison to Sunshine Hotel the photos are smallish, and of course, organized by project. Given the excellent print quality and fresh sequencing, Sunshine Hotel has enough separation from those two books to be worthwhile.

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Sunshine Hotel. By Mitch Epstein.


Blake Andrews is a photographer based in Eugene, OR. He writes about photography at blakeandrews.blogspot.com.


Book Review In Dreams Photographs by Dennis Hopper Reviewed by Zach Stieneker People are the primary subjects of In Dreams, and the cast of characters extends far beyond Hopper’s family. These images hold a celebratory spirit that seems in contrast with the melancholic character of the book’s title and the images of Hopper’s family, but ultimately testifies to the way nostalgia can tightly border grieving.

https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DT577
In Dreams. By Dennis Hopper.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=DT577
In Dreams  
Photographs by Dennis Hopper

Damiani, Italy, 2019. In English. 140 pp., 97 illustrations, 9¼x8".

There’s a man in a black leather jacket turning toward a stereo; there’s the click of the play button; there’s the disembodied strum of an acoustic guitar. And then there’s Roy Orbison’s voice, crooning “In Dreams” as the man in the black leather jacket silently sings along, his gleaming eyes betraying the forlorn gaze of someone staring more inward than outward.

The scene is from David Lynch’s Blue Velvet (1986), and the man is Frank Booth, played by Dennis Hopper. It represents one of the many iconic performances that famously link Hopper’s name to Hollywood. Although his work as a visual artist and photographer is lesser known, a line of books assembled from Hopper’s photographic archive, edited and designed by Michael Schmelling, testifies to the late actor’s talent in the medium. The latest, In Dreams, is conceptualized as a throughline, an effort to “connect his roles as photographer, husband, and actor” through a series of images made between 1961 and 1967.

Biker Couple, 1961. By Dennis Hopper.

This period, concurrent with a lull in Hopper’s acting career, entails the full extent of his photographic output. His abandonment of photography was as wholehearted as the fervor with which he practiced it. “I was trying to forget…” Hopper confessed in interview, “[t]he photographs represented failure to me. A painful parting from Marin (daughter) and Brooke (ex-wife), my art collection, the house that I lived in and the life that I had known for those eight years.”

That the book’s title, In Dreams, refers specifically to the Orbison ballad that entrances Frank Booth rather than the general realm of the phantasmagorical becomes particularly significant in light of Hopper’s words. In its final verses, the song transmits a similar sense of melancholia:

But just before the dawn, I awake and find you gone
I can't help it, I can't help it, if I cry
I remember that you said goodbye

It's too bad that all these things
Can only happen in my dreams
Only in dreams, in beautiful dreams

If the notion of dreams typically invokes the fantastical and enigmatic, this collection of images then resides on a different (though sometimes overlapping) plane. Dreams here are memories, hazy relics of a lost love, yearnings for a halcyon past.

Waiting for Dailies, 1961–67. By Dennis Hopper.

The book opens with an image that encapsulates this dynamic. It shows two hands –– one small, one large –– hovering above a puddle, index fingers outstretched and pointing. The hands belong to Hopper’s daughter Marin and his ex-wife, Brooke Hayward. Joined in the search for tiny fascinations, a feeling of intimate togetherness emanates from the photograph. Hopper’s presence as he crouches alongside his family feels implicit. There’s a unity that we know will not hold –– that may already be crumbling –– and so, the image becomes an emblem of Hopper’s lost, beautiful dream.

Girl in Rear-view Mirror, 1961–67. By Dennis Hopper.
David Hemmings with Lips, 1961–67. By Dennis Hopper.
We are only able to see Marin and Brooke in this photograph through their hands –– an elusiveness that they maintain throughout the collection. The only other photograph of Marin depicts her feet pressed against the back of a car seat; we see her metonymically. Brooke, meanwhile, returns as a weary grocery shopper, a small photograph in an oval frame, a model in a backyard photoshoot, and an out-of-focus lover. In none of these images, however, does she seem to concede herself to the camera –– rather, she is figured with a certain evasiveness. Such unknowability reflects the fogging and fracturing that experiences undergo as they become increasingly distant memories. They can always be recalled, but never in the completeness of the moments from which the photographs were extracted.

People are the primary subjects of In Dreams, and the cast of characters extends far beyond Hopper’s family. Depicting a pantheon of 1960s notability, the book reads in part as a catalog of the actor’s celebrity milieu. These images hold a celebratory spirit that seems incongruent with the melancholic character of the book’s title and the images of Hopper’s family, but ultimately testifies to the way nostalgia can tightly border grieving.

In Dreams is a portrait of a phase in Dennis Hopper’s life. It’s one very particular phase in one very particular life. Its emotional contours, however, may not be so particular. Lost painfully or peacefully, it’s a poignant reminder that each completed phase of our lives will become another of our beautiful dreams.

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Jane Fonda (with garter), 1965. By Dennis Hopper.


Zach Stieneker holds a BA in English and Spanish from Emory University. Following graduation, he spent several months continuing his study of photography in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

photo-eye Gallery Announcing:
FRACTURED Opening February 28, 2020
photo-eye Gallery is thrilled to announce FRACTURED, our first-ever international juried exhibition, opening Friday, February 28th, 2020. This exhibition was juried by the photo-eye Gallery staff, and out of thousands of submissions, 25 artists were selected for the exhibition. We're excited to preview a few of the works from FRACTURED here today.

Above Image:  Marcus DeSieno, 47.366670, 8.550000, Archival Pigment Print of a Still from a Surveillance Camera,
16 x 20 inches

photo-eye recently announced that we are celebrating our 40th year with our first-ever juried exhibition. Over the past few months, photo-eye Gallery held an international open call for artwork relating to the concept FRACTURED. Artists were asked to be broadly creative in interpreting the theme of “fractured” as it might relate to our seemingly broken world, politics, society, identity, or emotional states of being. Applicants were also charged with exploring art’s role as a way to bridge personal and social divides in our fractured times. The gallery received an immense amount of work covering a wide range of these topics.

This exhibition was juried by the photo-eye Gallery staff, and out of thousands of submissions, 25 artists were selected for the exhibition.

The FRACTURED artists are: Charles Anselmo, Tom Atwood, Edward Bateman, David Paul Bayles, Jo Ann Chaus, Heidi Cost, Kelly Cowan, Lauren Davies, Monica Denevan, K.K. DePaul, Marcus DeSieno, Virgil DiBiase, Peter Essick, Jon Feinstein, Meg Griffiths, Jennifer Steensma Hoag, Ruth Lauer Manenti, William Lesch, Christine Lorenz, Marie Maher, Jennifer McClure, Daniel McCullough, Leigh Merrill, JP Terlizzi and Ira Wagner.

Within FRACTURED, our viewers can look forward to a very diverse exhibition of work that considers “fractures” both literally and from perspectives a bit more nebulous. Jo Ann Chaus mysteriously examines the concept of fractured identities in her bold, psychologically captivating self-portraiture, while the photographs of grafted tree species by David Paul Bayles are a direct representation of man-made fractures in our agricultural environment. There are fresh, unexpected takes on materials as seen in Lauren Davies’ deconstructed blanket works, which push the boundaries of how a photograph can exist — in this case, as a fractured, deconstructed object. The show also features exciting explorations into alternative analog photography techniques like the physical alterations Daniel McCullough makes to his film before exposing it, which creates chance interactions between his mark-making and imagery.


Artwork Preview:

Jo Ann Chaus, Shutters, Archival Pigment Print, 19 x 13 inches

David Paul Bayles, Orchard for Arlo 62, Archival Pigment Print, 16 x 16 inches 


Lauren Davies, Detroit House 2, Deconstructed Woven Photography,
22 x 24 inches

Daniel McCullough, Untitled, 2018, Archival Pigment Print, 20x25 inches

FRACTURED will run February 28th – May 23, 2020, with an opening reception Friday, February 28 from 5-7pm corresponding with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Railyard Arts District.

A full online portfolio of works from FRACTURED will debut in the coming weeks. For more information, and to purchase prints, please contact Gallery Staff at 505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com.


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Book Store Interview Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes Photographs by Jason Tippet Interview by Blake Andrews Blake Andrews sits down with Jason Tippet to discuss his first monograph, Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes, a beautiful collection of 35mm, documentary-style photographs and a chronicle of the mundane absurdities that make Atwater Village in East Los Angeles both totally charming and utterly bizarre.
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=ZJ208
https://www.photoeye.com/bookstore/citation.cfm?catalog=ZJ208
Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes
Photographs by Jason Tippet

Oscilloscope Laboratories, 2019. 80 pp., 12x9"

The first monograph from award-winning filmmaker Jason Tippet, Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes is a beautiful collection of 35mm, documentary-style photographs and a chronicle of the mundane absurdities that make Atwater Village in East Los Angeles both totally charming and utterly bizarre.

The following interview has been edited for brevity and clarity.
 


Blake Andrews: Congrats on Heading To Bill’s For Cigarettes.

Jason Tippet: Thanks man, it feels good to work so hard on something and finally have it out there.

BA: How did the book come about?

JT: Well, I wanted to make a documentary that followed these two older guys going to the Santa Anita race track... We shot over a period of months, but cut it down to feel like it happened in one day. I grew up going with my dad and uncles and now it's something that's fading away, for a good reason, but still breaks my heart a bit looking at old photos of that place packed...

Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes. By Jason Tippet.

BA: Are those two older guys in the book Heading to Bills?

JT: Yeah, they're in the book. Have you been before?

BA: I've never been. Is that the track where the horses died?

JT: Yeah, that's the track. Now it feels like an abandoned cruise ship — empty rooms everywhere, vacant stands, feels like it's on its way out. It's terrible.

BA: So was the idea to film a documentary there based on the deaths?

JT: No, nothing to do with the deaths... or making a comment on horse racing. Fredrick Wiseman has a film called Racetrack made during the heyday of racing and I thought it might be a nice juxtaposition — to see it now when the sport isn't as popular.

BA: I'm browsing through the book trying to guess which guys are on their way to the racetrack. Maybe the guy in the pink polo shirt?

JT: Haha, yeah.

BA: And the guy chomping the cigar in front of Bill's?

JT: I see that guy around the neighborhood. He's got a cigar in his mouth walking around every morning. You see the same people everywhere... I don't know what that says about me, but I see these same guys at the bars I go to and run into them at the track. It’s a small world. Those guys are real characters. The Italian guy —I’ll probably make a short about him. It's incredible what people want to get off their chest if you put the time in to listen. I love it, and the reason for this is meeting people. I love meeting people like that. It's tough to tell in a photo that he thinks his landlord is poisoning him.

Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes. By Jason Tippet.

BA: So you started out making a film but wound up making a photobook?

JT: I couldn't find funding for that film and my buddy Carl McLaughlin was going out shooting a lot during that time, so I'd join him. He was taking these gorgeous night shots of Chatsworth, CA and developing and printing at his house. He had these photobooks out and I'd look through them. I thought the idea might work better as a book because I could bring a film camera in no problem, so started on that project. But that felt like it was going to take a while, so I started bringing my camera around where I lived. Every time I'd leave my place something slightly off was happening and I just really enjoyed capturing it. At first it was just to show my friends, but then Carl showed me there’s a great community of photographers online. That's when I started to get motivated about turning these projects into books.

Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes. By Jason Tippet.
BA: What were some of the photobooks Carl had that inspired you?

JT: He had a Fred Herzog book, Modern Color, that stuck out to me. Then I became interested in Martin Parr. Jill Freedman's books have also had a big impact on me. Take her book Firehouse for example. That's how I'd like to approach future projects. Picking a subject and following it along. It’s similar to how I'd shoot a movie, but with photos.

BA: So you plan to make future photobooks?

JT: Oh, I’m hooked. I have another, smaller book ready to go. It’s called My Cousin's Second Wedding. It’s really unflattering, bright flash, bad wedding shots.

BA: Cool. Did you shoot "bad" photos on purpose?

JT: Yeah. I guess I went in trying to take photos most people wouldn't like... people’s eyes closed, people's heads cut off.

BA: How much oversight/editing did Oscilloscope provide with the Heading To Bill’s For Cigarettes? Did you come to them with the product ready to go? Or did they shape it?

JT: Putting out movies with them and now putting out a book, it's the same process working with Oscilloscope. They want the artist to be happy with what they're putting out. They have great taste so I'd ask for their opinion, but in the end, they let me make exactly what I want. I hope they keep putting out books.

BA: Is Heading to Bill's For Cigarettes meant to tell a story of some sort?

JT: There's this documentary, Tchoupitoulas, that takes place in one night, but it was shot over a few months. I liked the idea of someone feeling like they got to spend a day hanging out with me around Atwater Village. It’s supposed to feel like you’re moving through the day, from when you get up in the morning to the end, when you go home.

Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes. By Jason Tippet.
BA: I hadn't noticed the sequence of lighting before. The book goes from morning light to afternoon to dark.

JT: It's me out running errands, getting food, stopping by the market... getting cigarettes. It’s more of a feeling. A lazy day. And for some reason photos can bring out those feelings more often for me. Tree of Life gives me a similar reaction.

BA: Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes refers to you then? Is that your spot for cigs?

JT: Yeah, I'm usually there once a day. Beer, cigarettes, laundry detergent, etc. The other thing about photobooks I appreciate is, people have to concentrate on them. You can't open your computer and do other things while you're flipping through a photobook. Well, you could. People throw on Netflix and don't pay attention to half of it.

Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes. By Jason Tippet.
BA: I'm flipping through your book as I type this. But I know what you mean.

JT: Haha, yeah, I might be wrong about this. I just appreciate giving proper attention to something, and for me, photobooks are relaxing, a chance to slow things down.

BA: A photobook can be more self-contained than other content. Anything that might come through a screen nowadays is by nature open to distraction. Because that's the nature of anything digital. Anything on your phone is always in a fight with other content for your attention.

JT: Absolutely. It isn't given the same level of respect as something tangible for some reason.

BA: I kind of feel that way about movies. You walk into a theater and you are in that world for 2 hours, nothing else exists.

JT: Completely... I went to see The Irishman in theaters cause I knew I'd be stopping it and get distracted at home.

BA: Do you see yourself shifting from filmmaking to still photography?

JT: I'd like to stick with what I'm excited about, and right now that's photography. I work in the film industry. It’s something I still want to do and mainly do for work right now... I'm sure one day I'll get excited about it again.

BA: Oscilloscope's press release compares you to Eggleston: “The Eggleston Of the Instagram Generation." What do you think of that description?

JT: Ha, I mean Eggleston liked to have a good time and enjoyed getting into memorable situations. I think as far as my work, I have a long way to go. I just enjoy saying yes to things and seeing where it takes me — like putting myself in an uncomfortable situation for a story.

Still, I can't believe Bill’s is out, I was working on it for a while. Actually, a few years isn't so bad, Rob Hornstra spends years documenting these people and places.

BA: How many years were you working on yours?

JT: ...including shooting, 4 years.

BA: Yikes!

JT: Haha, yeah.

Order Heading to Bill’s for Cigarettes on our website

Heading to Bill's for Cigarettes. By Jason Tippet.


Jason Tippet is a filmmaker living in Los Angeles. During his final year at CalArts, he directed the documentary short Thompson, which played Sundance and won the Jury Award at SXSW. In 2012, he directed with Elizabeth Mims the acclaimed documentary Only the Young, which was released theatrically by Oscilloscope. Jason is currently directing on the new season of Drunk History. His first book of photography, Heading to Bill’s for Cigarettes, is out now through Oscilloscope.


Blake Andrews is a photographer based in Eugene, OR. He writes about photography at blakeandrews.blogspot.com.

photo-eye Gallery photo-eye Gallery at photo LA 2020 photo-eye Gallery is thrilled to be back in Santa Monica, CA this week for Photo LA 2020, and we're excited to feature work by Julie Blackmon, Kate Breakey, Beth Moon, and Reuben Wu.

Julie Blackmon, Ezra, 2019, Archival Pigment Print, 31 x 26 inches, edition of 10, $4,000

photo-eye Gallery is thrilled to be exhibiting at Photo LA in 2020. Held again at the Barker Hanger in Santa Monica, California, Photo LA is a premier photographic art exposition returning for its 28th season. Our booth, #B08, will feature an incredible selection of new and recent work by represented artists including Julie Blackmon's social portraits, Beth Moon's Savage Garden series, orotones by Kate Breakey, and a collection of Areoglyphs and Other Nocturnes by Reuben Wu – who's returning to the fair for a second straight year with photo-eye. A selection of exhibiting artists is listed below along with a brief preview of works we're bringing to the fair. If you are in the Los Angeles area or will be making the trip out to Photo LA we'd love to have you drop by the booth and say hello.

photo-eye Gallery at Photo LA
January 30 - February 2, 2020
Barker Hanger, Santa Monica, CA
Booth # B08


Exhibiting Artists

Artwork Preview

Julie Blackmon, Talent Show, 26x26 inches, Edition of 10, $4,000


Kate Breakey, Six Pears, Archival Pigment Ink on Glass, 24kt Gold Leaf7x16 inches, Edition of 20, $1,700

Beth Moon, Nepenthes Bicalcarata, Platinum / Palladium Print7.5x5 inches, Edition of 9, $900

Reuben Wu, AE 1144, Archival Pigment Print, 15x20 inches, Edition of 10, $950



• • • • •

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published. 
Prices will increase as the print editions sell.

For more information, and to purchase prints, please contact Gallery Staff at 
505-988-5152 x202 or gallery@photoeye.com

photo-eye Gallery Radiant Allure Kate Breakey's Orotones at photo-eye Gallery Alexandra Jo A selection of 24kt gold leaf orotones featuring images of trees is included in Tree Stories, Kate Breakey’s solo exhibition currently on view at photo-eye Gallery. The orotones add brightness and depth to the subtle hand-colored archival pigment prints and delicate hand-embroidered photographs on silk that make up the rest of the exhibition.

Kate Breakey, Eucalyptus Tree, Fallen Boughs, Kangaroo Island, Archival pigment ink on glass, 24kt gold leaf, 10 x 15 inches, edition of 20, $1920 framed 

The luminescent flash of Kate Breakey’s orotones is a large part of their instant allure. These works are made by printing images directly onto glass, and then carefully applying 24 karat gold leaf behind the ink. The orotones shimmer when directly lit and emanate a warm glow in subdued lighting. The contrast between the ink and gold backing, and the way light is reflected from the gold, creates a shifting, radiant presence that thoroughly captivates viewers.

Kate Breakey, Eucalyptus Trees, Xmas Day,
South Australia,
Archival pigment ink on glass,
24kt gold leaf, 5 x 12 inches, Edition of 20, $1375 framed 
The other side of what makes these unique works so appealing to a wide audience is being able to understand Breakey’s motivation for creating them. In her artist statement about the series, she explains that these works are “an act of investigation — a passionate attempt to establish an understanding of the natural world.” Breakey uses the images in her orotones to highlight and record individual moments in the world that might otherwise go unseen. This insight allows viewers to truly appreciate Breakey’s selective eye and knack for observation.

Like most of Breakey’s work, the orotones are editioned, and yet there is room for variance and individuality in each piece. Since each work is custom framed, and the gold leaf is applied by hand (like the embroidery and hand-applied color in her other works) no two images in an edition will be entirely identical. This makes each piece feel special, and function as a unique object.

A selection of the orotones featuring images of trees is included in Tree Stories, Kate Breakey’s solo exhibition currently on view at photo-eye Gallery. The show combines work from three different series of Breakey’s work, displaying a range of photographic techniques that she is known for. The orotones add brightness and depth to the subtle hand-colored archival pigment prints and delicate hand-embroidered photographs on silk that make up the rest of the exhibition.

Kate Breakey, Scrub, Kangaroo Island, Australia, Archival pigment ink on glass, 24kt gold leaf, 10 x 15 inches, 
Edition of 20, $1925 framed 


Tree Stories is on view at photo-eye Gallery through February 22, 2020. photo-eye Gallery will also show a selection of Kate Breakey's orotones to Photo LA at the end of January. 


»View more work by Kate Breakey

»Read more about Kate Breakey

»More info on Photo LA

All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com


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photo-eye Gallery Reminder: Apply to FRACTURED Open Call F R A C T U R E D,photo-eye Gallery's first ever open call for entries, is a perfect opportunity to have your work seen by our gallery staff, and offers the chance of having your work exhibited in our physical gallery space in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
F R A C T U R E D
photo-eye Gallery's 2020 Juried Exhibition

Above Image: Christopher Colville, Citizen 13 [cropped], from the series Beyond Reckoning




The deadline to apply to photo-eye Gallery's first ever open call for artwork is January 12, 2020! 

The new year brings with it resolutions and ambitious goal-setting. If you're like many other artists, you may have set the intention of showing your artwork more in 2020. Applying to
F R A C T U R E D,  photo-eye Gallery's first ever open call for entries, is a perfect opportunity to have your work seen by our gallery staff, and offers the chance of having your work exhibited in our physical gallery space in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Read more about the open call below:


photo-eye in Santa Fe, New Mexico is celebrating 40 years with our first-ever Open Call. Our gallery seeks photographic submissions for F R A C T U R E D, a juried exhibition to take place in our physical gallery and online.

We invite the submission of photographic works exploring the concept of “fractured.” Artists are encouraged to be creative in their interpretation of the theme. Photographic works” may include any light-based images, or works created using any photographic process or materials.

Submitted photographs may come from photojournalistic or documentary projects, commercial assignments, as well as photographs made as expressive artworks.


Cig Harvey's Gardening at Night installed at photo-eye Gallery

Jurors: photo-eye Gallery Staff, including:

Rixon Reed, Founder & Director
Anne Kelly, Gallery Director
Alexandra Jo, Gallery Assistant
Lucas Shaffer, Artist Relationships
Vicki Bohannon, Preparator


Overview:
Fractured is an international call for entries open to all artists making photographic work that has not been previously exhibited by photo-eye or has appeared on our website. Fractured is a physical exhibition to be installed at photo-eye Gallery, 541 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, MN, 87501 with digital representation online at photoeye.com/gallery.

Fee for Entry:
Fractured requires a $35 non-refundable application fee that permits 3 submissions. Additional submissions cost $5 each, with a maximum of 20 submissions per application. Applications will be evaluated and accepted on a per-artwork basis, not on a per-project or per-artist basis.

Application Process:
Applications are only being accepted online through CaFÉ. Applicants are responsible for monitoring their CaFÉ account for updates regarding application status and jury results. A valid email address must be provided through CaFÉ for correspondence. Notifications regarding the Jury’s decisions will be sent on Monday, January 20, 2020.

Open Call & Exhibition Timeline:

  • Entry Deadline: January 12, 2020
  • Notification of Results: January 20, 2020 (by email and posted to CaFÉ accounts)
  • Artwork Received at photo-eye Gallery: February 14– 20, 2020
  • Exhibition Opening: Friday, February 28, 2020
  • Artwork returned the first week of June



For more information about Fractured and the Call for Entries,
please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com

photo-eye Gallery
541 South Guadalupe Street
Santa Fe, NM 87501
– view map –


photo-eye Gallery photo-eye Gallery Staff 2019 Favorites 2019 was an excellent year for photography at photo-eye Gallery. In the spirit of sending out the old year and welcoming in the new, photo-eye Gallery staff has taken on the difficult task of picking out some photographic highlights of 2019. Each staff member has chosen a favorite work exhibited in the gallery, and a favorite photograph by a represented artist released this past year.

From left to right, Images by Beth Moon, Julie Blackmon, and Chris Colville
2019 was an excellent year for photography at photo-eye Gallery. In the spirit of sending out the old year and welcoming in the new, photo-eye Gallery staff has taken on the difficult task of picking out some photographic highlights of 2019. Each staff member has chosen a favorite work exhibited in the gallery, and a favorite photograph by a represented artist released this past year. Read more about our selections below.

Happy New Year from photo-eye Gallery!


Anne Kelly 

Gallery Director

I love images that create a sense of wonder and make me look at the world differently. Nature has also always been a source of fascination. At this point in history, we have a decent understanding of the natural world, from the cosmos to tiny plants and flowers, but there are still so many elements left unproven or that we can’t comprehend. As we approach 2020 we have a wealth of information and images at our fingertips – we are saturated in it, so if one single image can make me pause, I find that joyful. Though I had so very many favorite images from 2019, two that stand out to me are Reuben Wu’s XT1876 and Beth Moon’s Nepenthes Bicalcarata

XT1876 by Reuben Wu


Reuben Wu, XT1876, Archival Pigment Print, 15x20 inches, Edition of 10, $1,250
Wu landscapes bring something new and fresh to the genre of landscape photography, a genre with a lot of history. By creating images that let us experience the landscape in a different way, visually freezing space and time, it is a refreshing reminder of just how much we probably don’t know. In XT1876, Wu uses light to paint almost a perfect circle on the horizon and seems to be projecting light forward. The perfect circle calls attention to the everchanging, imperfect but lovely shapes that have been temporally painted in the salt flats by the water and wind.  This image feels simultaneously primordial and post-apocalyptic.


Nepenthes Bicalcarata by Beth Moon


Beth Moon, Nepenthes Bicalcarata, Platinum/Palladium Print, 7.5x5 inches, Edition of 9, $900
Beth Moon’s Nepenthes Bicalcarata is a close-up portrait of a carnivores plant. What originally caught my attention about this image is simply the pleasing form of this plant – a bit like a music note. The print itself is an exquisite handmade platinum print and is somewhat reminiscent of the photogravures by professor Karl Blossfeldt, of close-up studies of plants made in the late ’20s. Moon recently explained to me that scientists believe that Bicalcarata has evolved to have fangs to protect nutrients that the plant has captured, yet they are not entirely sure.



Lucas Shaffer

Special Projects & Client Relations

I’ve always been a fan of artists who use materials in unique ways and push the boundaries of the photographic process to create compelling contemporary images. In 2019, photo-eye Gallery featured a number of artists making exciting non-traditional work, from Reuben Wu’s ethereal drone-lit landscapes to Diane Bloomfield’s tricolor gum bichromate still-lifes, but I keep coming back to Colleen Fitzgerald’s Land & Sea II and Christopher Colville’s Citizen 13 for their impact and complexity.


Land & Sea II by Colleen Fitzgerald


Colleen Fitzgerald, Land & Sea II, Archival Pigment Print, 20x24 inches, Edition of 5, $1,200
Fitzgerald’s Land & Sea II is a fascinating dialogue between the artist and the viewer wrapped in a delightful package. Reductively, Fitzgerald is saying “look what I can do” to the viewer, prompting a conversation about photography’s detailed and inherently convincing nature and the artist’s ability to manipulate an image. Gently curling the sheet film prior to exposure in a custom-built film holder leads the resulting image warped, creased, stained, and unexposed in areas. The technical imperfections and physical alterations are fully on display in the final print seeming to acknowledge that the truth of an image is shared between the artist’s intentions and the viewer’s experience. The end result is sleek, geometric, and elegant. Land & Sea II is delightfully simple on the surface but has depth if you want to dive in.


Citizen 13 by Christopher Colville


Christopher Colville, Citizen 13, Unique Silver Gelatin Print, 32x25 inches, $7,650
I feel like Christopher Colville’s Citizen 13 is a master class in fitting form to function. Using his explosive gun-powder based technique, Colville exposes human-shaped targets found in abandoned shooting ranges to traditional light-sensitive photographic paper to build a commentary on gun violence in American society. The resulting image is powerful. It’s haunting, energetic, and visceral imagery is created from a perfect combination of materials, skilled craftsmanship, and a vulnerability to investigate a divisive topic that can be deeply personal. Citizen 13 is from Colville’s Beyond Reckoning series, which made it’s photo-eye debut this October, and in my opinion, is some of Colville’s best and most complex work to date.



Alexandra Jo

Gallery Assistant

Meditation on the Northern Hemisphere 8 by Christopher Colville

Christopher Colville, Meditation on the Northern Hemisphere 8, Unique Silver Gelatin Print, 2x24 inches, $4,300

Christopher Colville’s work has a dark magnetism that is able to wholly pull me into the abstract, violent beauty of his images. Between the bursts of gunpowder marks flung across his compositions, and the fluid, undulating evocations of smoke, landscape, and sky created by his unique process, his work has the capacity to transport viewers into worlds of ethereal meditations centered on beauty and darkness.

Meditation on the Northern Hemisphere 8 is one of Colville’s least flashy images and took its time climbing to the top of my list of favorite works. This image’s monochromatic grey-black visual field, which seems quite flat at first glance, is actually rippling with atmospheric depth and texture.  Like the rest of Colville’s works in the Northern Hemisphere series, the primary aspect of the composition is a punctured, circular shape, the patterns of which reflect the mapped constellations of the northern hemisphere’s night sky at the time the work was created. The resulting image references lunar bodies, the cratered face of a distant planet, and the deep charcoal grey seems to pulse and wave like an ocean, or clusters of particles in deep space.

For me, the clincher of this particular work is the presence of delicate fingerprints in the corners of the picture plane, left behind by Colville during the work’s creation. The inclusion of these intimate details along the edges of the final piece act as a connection to Colville’s photographic process. He creates his work in the dark of the desert at night, transporting chemicals, developers, paper, and gunpowder into secluded areas of land far away from artificial light. With this image in particular, its map of the stars, and the indexical traces of the artist’s hand, I feel like I’ve been given a glimpse back in time, into the moment of the image's creation.


Ezra by Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon, Ezra, Archival Pigment Print, 31x26 inches, Edition of 10, $4,000

Julie Blackmon’s ability to subtly braid mystery and narrative into an image is masterful. In her photograph titled Ezra, released earlier this year, that ability takes the forefront. The photograph features a young girl with fabulous hair and an unprecedented aura of maturity surrounded by various Polaroids and little clues (like a parrot perched on top of a door, sparse furniture, a spilled jar of birdseed) that weave a sense of cryptic wonder into the scene.

In this specific image, Blackmon’s choice of a bright color palate allows the image to straddle both sides of believable and fantastical while pointing to the auteur aesthetic sensibilities of someone like Wes Anderson. This image, like so many others in Blackmon’s repertoire, creates an entire world out of things from real, ordinary life with this unifying aesthetic power. The way her images are so carefully balanced, believable yet surreal, straightforward and enigmatic, makes me want to revisit each of them again and again.

Ezra also specifically speaks to me with the precise expression on the girl’s face… so youthful, yet full of anomalous knowing. I keep returning to this colorful room with the Polaroids and the birdseed, and the girl who is wise beyond her years, searching for the answer to the mystery Blackmon has created.



All prices listed were current at the time this post was published.

For more information, and to purchase artworks, please contact photo-eye Gallery Staff at:
(505) 988-5152 x 202 or gallery@photoeye.com


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