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Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Morten Andersen Photographer Morten Andersen selects Shikishima by Tamiko Nishimura published by Zen Foto Gallery as photo-eye Book of the Week.

Shikishima. By Tamiko Nishimura.
Zen Foto Gallery, 2014.


This week's Book of the Week selection comes from photographer Morten Andersen who has selected Shikishima by Tamiko Nishimura published by Zen Foto Gallery.

photo-eye Gallery Photographer's Showcase: Svjetlana Tepavcevic's Means of Reproduction — New Work photo-eye Gallery is pleased to release a new portfolio of images from Svjetlana Tepavcevic's Means of Reproduction series on the Photographer's Showcase. Tepavcevic talks about the new images with photo-eye Gallery's Erin Azouz.
photo-eye Gallery is pleased to announce the release of a new portfolio of work by Svjetlana Tepavcevic, Means of Reproduction  New Work. The new images are a continuation of the series by Tepavcevic that we published last year (read the first interview we did with her on photo-eye Blog). Means of Reproduction is a vivid, colorful exploration of the world of seeds and seedpods, which hold the code for life and allude to the passage of time, death and rebirth. I asked Svjetlana to discuss some of the new photographs in this series and how the project has evolved. —Erin Azouz

Svjetlana Tepavcevic, Means of Reproduction no. 524
Erin Azouz:     You've stated that coming across the seeds and seed pods naturally, such as on hikes in the wilderness, is important to you. Can you talk about how that informs your work?

Svjetlana Tepavcevic:     It is important to me to be aware of the world around me — not just on hikes in the wilderness, but every day, wherever I happen to be at the moment. Our environment is fascinating and enormously complex, but we mostly go through life not paying attention to its complexities. And that’s the whole point of the project — to show the essential elements of life in a new and unfamiliar way, to make people more aware of the world around them.

EA:     Can you tell us about the experience of encountering some of the seed pods in this new portfolio? How and where did you find them?

ST:     About half of the images in this new portfolio are of the seeds and seed pods I found, mostly going about my daily life, in totally unadventurous scenarios, such as picking up clothes at dry cleaners, where I found the silver maple samaras. The Japanese maple is from my neighborhood.

Book Review Ongaku By Junichi Taguchi Reviewed by George Slade I was forewarned that this book had something to do with music. Its title is the Japanese word for music. Naturally, then, I brought it to my violinist friend for any general comments and asked her to translate the inscriptions on the cover.

Ongaku. By Junichi Taguchi.
Tosei-Sha, 2013.
 
Ongaku
Reviewed by George Slade

Ongaku
By Junichi Taguchi

$44.00
Tosei-Sha, 2013. 73 pp., 36 color illustrations, 10¼x7¾".


I was forewarned that this book had something to do with music. Its title is the Japanese word for music. Naturally, then, I brought it to my violinist friend for any general comments and asked her to translate the inscriptions on the cover. To me, the notations Fl, Xyl, Vib, and Voice at the beginning of four staffs were cryptic.

Stephanie casually informed musically-challenged me that these were the parts of a composition for flute, xylophone, vibraphone, and voice. To her eyes, their meaning was simple and clear. I then wondered how inscrutable the book’s contents would be.

There is, fortunately for us, more visual language here than musical. Ongaku presents two worlds made by hand. One world produces the ethereal realm of sound, while the other refers to the entirely physical environment of rock, mineral, and wood.


Books In Stock at photo-eye: Signed Photobooks Under $20 Four signed in stock photobooks from Yann Gross, Murray Brott and Jim Krantz all under $20.


Book Review William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography By Mirjam Brusius, Katrina Dean, & Chitra Ramalingam Reviewed by Alexandra Huddleston William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography is an illustrated collection of twelve academic essays on the eponymous inventor of numerous early photographic technologies.

William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography.
 By Mirjam Brusius, Katrina Dean, & Chitra Ramalingam.
Yale University Press, 2013.
 
William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography
Reviewed by Alexandra Huddleston

William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography
By Mirjam Brusius, Katrina Dean, and Chitra Ramalingam

$75.00
Yale University Press, New Haven, 2013. 328 pp., 100 color illustrations, 7x10".


William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography is an illustrated collection of twelve academic essays on the eponymous inventor of numerous early photographic technologies. The stated aim of the work is to use recent research on Talbot’s archive of manuscripts, notebooks, correspondences, and photographs to contextualize Talbot and his photographic discoveries within the framework of his other research and of the historical, cultural, and scientific context he inhabited.

As a collective, the essays effectively do just that, and a quick glance at the biographies of their authors shows why the essays are so persuasive and why the subtitle is aptly ‘beyond photography.’ Talbot was the quintessential polymath, and his work on photography’s discovery is only the most well know of his many research topics. He was also a botanist (with a particular interest in mosses), a mathematician (with a focus on elliptic functions), an Assyriologist (who worked on the early decipherment of cuneiform), and an amateur fiction writer. His accomplishments in many of these fields may never have been groundbreaking, but they are significant enough that the expertise of the historians of mathematics, science, and Ancient Middle Eastern science who have contributed some of the included essays brings a necessary perspective to Talbot’s work and his place in art and scientific history.

William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography. By Mirjam Brusius, Katrina Dean, & Chitra RamalingamYale University Press, 2013.

Individual readers will most likely choose their favorite essays depending on their own particular interests and preoccupations, and there is a wide range to choose from. I was particular fascinated by Larry J Schaaf’s piece 'The Caxton of Photography:' Talbot’s Etchings of Light since I was not aware that Talbot discovered the halftone dot and developed early techniques of photogravure.

William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography. By Mirjam Brusius, Katrina Dean, & Chitra RamalingamYale University Press, 2013.

Perhaps the most startling quote for readers who only know of Talbot as Britain’s contestant for the inventor of photography is Eleanor Robson’s statement at the end of her essay “Bel and the Dragon: Deciphering Cuneiform after Decipherment”: “Assyriology provided, in short, a limitless source of apparently unattractive and intractable problems of the sort that Talbot had relished since he was a child. From this perspective it is clear that Talbot’s Assyriology was far from an irrelevance, an old man’s hobby with which he idled away the quiet decades between his great invention and his death. On the contrary—indeed, to be deliberately contrarian—one could even argue that photography was just a phase he went through on the way to finding his true vocation.”

William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography. By Mirjam Brusius, Katrina Dean, & Chitra RamalingamYale University Press, 2013.

William Henry Fox Talbot: Beyond Photography is part of a series of works on British art published by the Yale Center for British Art and the Paul Mellon Center for Studies in British Art. There are relatively few photographs in the book, and the work makes no apologies for its academic approach—and it has no reason to. However, a reader seeking an image-rich study or a more introductory text on early British photography would probably be more likely to enjoy a different work (such as Impressed by Light: British Photographs from Paper Negative, 1840-1860 or a the fairly recent publication of a reproduction of The Pencil of Nature). Nonetheless, anyone who enjoys lifting higher the veil thrown by the obscurities of time and culture over the past, will enjoy the light shed by the essays of this book on one of photography’s pioneers.—ALEXANDRA HUDDLESTON


ALEXANDRA HUDDLESTON is an American photographer who was born in Freetown, Sierra Leone, and grew up in the Washington, DC area and in West Africa. She holds a BA from Stanford University and an MS in broadcast journalism from Columbia University. Her work has been published in The New York TimesZeit Magazine, and National Geographic Explorer, and exhibited in group and solo shows worldwide. Among other honors, she has received a Fulbright Grant for her photographic work. Her prints are in the permanent collection of the US Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division and the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African Art Eliot Elisofon Photo Archives. In 2012 Huddleston published the collaborative artists’ book Lost Things under her own imprint, The Kyoudai Press. 333 Saints: A Life of Scholarship in Timbuktu is her second book and Searching for Lost Time: Night Photographs from Timbuktu is her third. http://www.alexandrahuddleston.com

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Jim Stone Photographer and educator Jim Stone selects We Shall by Paul D'Amato published by DePaul Art Museum as photo-eye Book of the Week.

We Shall. By Paul D'Amato.
DePaul Art Museum, 2013.

This week's Book of the Week selection comes from photographer and educator Jim Stone who has selected We Shall by Paul D'Amato published by DePaul Art Museum.

Video In-Print Photobook Video #44: Camouflages By Joan Fontcuberta With Erin Azouz Erin Azouz presents Joan Fontcuberta's Camouflages in #44 of our in-print photo book video series.
In video #44 of our In-Print Photobook series, Erin Azouz shares with us Camouflages by Joan Fontcuberta co-published by Contrasto.

Book Review Water By Edward Burtynsky Reviewed by Blake Andrews Edward Burtynsky has never been one to dabble in small gestures. Whether the subject is oil, China, or mining, his focus is on large-scale processes. And his technical practices go hand in hand. He uses large format equipment to produce wall-size prints. His books are dense. In the words of Geoff Dyer, Burtynsky "is as close to stadium rock as a landscape photographer is likely to get."

Water. By Edward Burtynsky.
Steidl, 2013.
 
Water
Reviewed by Blake Andrews

Water
By Edward Burtynsky

$128.00
Steidl, 2013. 228 pp., 114 color photographs, 14¼x11½". 


Edward Burtynsky has never been one to dabble in small gestures. Whether the subject is oil, China, or mining, his focus is on large-scale processes. And his technical practices go hand in hand. He uses large format equipment to produce wall-size prints. His books are dense. In the words of Geoff Dyer, Burtynsky "is as close to stadium rock as a landscape photographer is likely to get."

Books In Stock Books from Parr & Badger's The Photobook: A History Vol. III Four in stock titles from Max Pam, Roe Ethridge, Rob Hornstra and Lieko Shiga featured in Martin Parr & Gerry Badger's The Photobook: A History Vol. III.



In celebration of the third and final volume of Martin Parr and Gerry Badger's The Photobook: A History, we're happy to share a few titles from the 200 books featured in the publication that we currently have in stock. All copies are first edition unless otherwise noted. Read Melanie McWhorter's review of The Photobook Vol. III.


Book Review Anders Petersen By Anders Petersen Reviewed by Karen Jenkins Writing of Anders Petersen’s devotion to photography’s analogue mode, in film cameras and silvery papers, essayist Hasse Persson likens his underground darkroom to a “gateway to heaven.” And Petersen’s giant new retrospective catalog from Max Ström surely showcases gorgeous tonal contrasts and expressive finesse in black and white, from a master of the old school.

Anders Petersen. By Anders Petersen.
Max Ström, 2013.
 
Anders Petersen
Reviewed by Karen Jenkins

Anders Petersen
By Anders Petersen

$75.00
Max Ström, 2013. 384 pp., 264 black & white illustrations, 9x13". 


Writing of Anders Petersen’s devotion to photography’s analogue mode, in film cameras and silvery papers, essayist Hasse Persson likens his underground darkroom to a “gateway to heaven.” And Petersen’s giant new retrospective catalog from Max Ström surely showcases gorgeous tonal contrasts and expressive finesse in black and white, from a master of the old school. Yet it’s also a funny analogy, in that a transcendence of this world seems so unlikely for a photographer so thoroughly rooted on earth, entwined in its mundane messiness and unexpected elegance. A young Petersen kicked off his photographic life in Hamburg in the late 1960s, frequenting a bar in the red light district and making those pictures that would form his celebrated book, Café Lehmitz published in 1978. This new volume situates that collection within a career-spanning sweep through the subsequent decades. Those he encountered in the street and at home (in private dwellings and institutional quarters) are at once fragile and hardened, weighed down and carefree. Tattoos are a shield and a revelation. Sexuality is frank, but only rarely lurid. Animals too run the gamut — as pets, and meat and wild things, flailing, restrained and stuffed.


Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Paula McCartney Photographer Paula McCartney picks I'm Not Tailgating, I'm Drafting by Jan Kempenaers as photo-eye Book of the Week.

I'm Not Tailgating, I'm Drafting. By Jan Kempenaers.
Roma Publications, 2013.

This week's Book of the Week selection comes from photographer Paula McCartney who has selected I'm Not Tailgating, I'm Drafting by Jan Kempenaers published by Roma Publications.

"I picked up I'm Not Tailgating, I'm Drafting, by Jan Kempenaers at the New York art book fair last fall and it has been sitting on top of my book shelf ever since. I was drawn to the book on the Roma table for the color print of a giant scarred tree trunk included with the book. The 16-fold binding, the saddle stitched archive of images, the contrast of the color images on the front side of the book with the black and white images on the back, all make for a really unique structure that doesn’t feel gimmicky. But what I keep opening the book up to experience is the image of the flowering tree, exploding in a two page spread with a sunburst of yellow blooms, each time warming me up through this long Minnesota winter."—Paula McCartney

photo-eye Gallery Video & Portfolios: Zoe Zimmerman photo-eye Gallery releases two new portfolios of older work from Zoe Zimmerman. On the occasion, Zimmerman sat down with us to discuss the albumen printing process, what brought her into the studio and her long-term collaboration with her daughter.

Sumie I, 2006 and Her Mother's Garden by Zoë Zimmerman

photo-eye Gallery has just released two new portfolios of older work from Zoë Zimmerman. Titled Birds, Nest & Fish and Girls, Glass & Vintage Photographs, the portfolios are full of over 30 stunning albumen prints. On the occasion, Zimmerman sat down with us to discuss the albumen printing process, what brought her into the studio and her long-term collaboration with her daughter.

Book Review Bücher Books By Boris Mikhailov Reviewed by David Ondrik Boris Mikhailov’s Bücher Books (like most text in the book, the German precedes the English) is a ponderous tome of 334 pages that reproduces two of his artists books, Structures of madness, or why shepherds living in the mountains often go crazy and Photomania in Crimea.

Bücher Books. By Boris Mikhailov.
Walther König, 2013.
 
Bücher Books
Reviewed by David Ondrik

Bücher Books
By Boris Mikhailov
$59.95
Walther König, 2013. 336 pp., 270 color illustrations, 9x12".


Boris Mikhailov’s Bücher Books (like most text in the book, the German precedes the English) is a ponderous tome of 334 pages that reproduces two of his artists books, Structures of madness, or why shepherds living in the mountains often go crazy and Photomania in Crimea. There are also essays, in both German and English, by Inka Schube, Helen Petrovsky, Bernd Stiegler, Tobias Wilke, Boris Groys, and Oksana Bulgakowa. Unfortunately, the essays are reflective of much academic writing on art and are verbose, lugubrious, and dull; nearly 80 pages that you’ll most likely skip unless you are a dedicated fan of Mikhailov’s work or in the unfortunate position of working on your MFA or a PhD in Art History.

Books In Stock Books from Parr & Badger's The Photobook: A History Vol. III Four in stock titles from John Gossage, Joel Meyerowitz, Michael Schmidt & Igor Samolet featured in Martin Parr & Gerry Badger's The Photobook: A History Vol. III.


In celebration of the third and final volume of Martin Parr and Gerry Badger's The Photobook: A History, we're happy to share a few titles from the 200 books featured in the publication that we currently have in stock. All copies are first edition unless otherwise noted. Read Melanie McWhorter's review of The Photobook Vol. III.


Interview Stephen Shore on New York Minute and From Galilee to the Negev Stephen Shore speaks to photo-eye's Melanie McWhorter about his two books published by Phaidon — New York Minute, the photographer's first iBook, and From Galilee to the Negev, a commissioned project that brought him to Israel and the West Bank.

A New York Minute and From Galilee to the Negev
by Stephen Shore. Published by Phaidon. 
New from Phaidon are two publications by Stephen Shore. Available now, A New York Minute is the first digital book from both the photographer and publisher. While referencing the traditional photobook, Shore engaged the unique multimedia format of the iBook by creating 16 moving images contained in a static frame, catching fragments of the nonstop bustle of New York or details easily lost in the relentless movement of the city. The "still photographs flowing in time," as Shore calls them, give new dimension to his photographic vision while also connecting to his early film work.