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Books In Stock at photo-eye: Signed Four signed titles from Grégoire Pujade-Lauraine, Graham MacIndoe, Dana Stoelzgen and Anton Kusters, all in stock at photo-eye Bookstore.
A Perpetual Season
By Grégoire Pujade-Lauraine published by MACK
$50 Signed — Purchase Book

Selected as one of the Best Books of 2014 by Alex F. Webb & Lewis Chalpin

"A Perpetual Season lays a photographic trail through a dream-like city, offering glimpses into a network of spaces that loom as silent witnesses to some forgotten order. Recurring concrete shapes and perplexed human beings punctuate the journey with a faintly elegiac tone which conjures up an inverted Arcadia, illuminated by the hopes and visions of a bygone era."—MACK


photo-eye Gallery Portfolio: Angela Bacon-Kidwell's Home By Nightfall photo-eye is pleased to introduce Home By Nightfall, a new portfolio of atmospheric black and white images by Angela Bacon-Kidwell, to the Photographer’s Showcase. We asked Bacon-Kidwell to tell us, in her own words, how she came to photography as an artistic practice, and how the dramatic and enigmatic Home By Nightfall series came to be.

Angela Bacon-Kidwell  A Faithful Surrender, 2014

photo-eye is pleased to introduce Home By Nightfall, a new portfolio of atmospheric black and white images by Angela Bacon-Kidwell, to the Photographer’s Showcase. Bacon-Kidwell photographs a lone road surrounded by stretches of a seemingly infinite smokey landscape bathed in gausy light. Ultimately speaking of transition and journey, a young boy, the series' only character, grapples with the environment — simultaneously resisting and embracing its cold and tumultuous demeanor. Almost narrative at times, Bacon-Kidwell plants us firmly at the road's center, lending a sensation of infinite space, and leaving the viewer to decide whether each scene describes past events or future obstacles. We asked Bacon-Kidwell to tell us, in her own words, how she came to photography as an artistic practice, and how the dramatic and enigmatic Home By Nightfall series came to be.

Book Review Out There By Bruno Augsburger Reviewed by Adam Bell Like a receding mirage, the “wild” has always existed beyond our reach. The exact position and nature of this categorical landscape shifts and changes depending on where we stand, but remains a constant trope — teasing us from afar and then slipping away. Journeying out beyond the perceived edge of civilized society and into this untamed space, it is easy to see the land as a foil or test.


Out There. By Bruno Augsburger.
STRUM & DRANG, 2014.
Out There
Reviewed by Adam Bell

Out There
By Bruno Augsburger
STURM & DRANG, 2014. 88 pp., 61 color illustrations, 14x11½".


Like a receding mirage, the “wild” has always existed beyond our reach. The exact position and nature of this categorical landscape shifts and changes depending on where we stand, but remains a constant trope — teasing us from afar and then slipping away. Journeying out beyond the perceived edge of civilized society and into this untamed space, it is easy to see the land as a foil or test. The nights are long, cold, or hot, and one is left largely to oneself. More imaginary than real, this desire for an untouched landscape has less to do with the terrain itself and has more to do with our desire for utopian renewal in a pristine landscape — a blank slate with which to not only position and redefine oneself but also move forward. Bruno Augsburger’s Out There joins a long tradition of venturing out into the wilderness. Evoking writers like Thoreau and London, Augsburger’s expansive images of the Yukon chart a personal journey and escape into a mythologized landscape.

Book Review Destino By Michelle Frankfurter Reviewed by Karen Jenkins Since 2009, Michelle Frankfurter has traveled throughout Mexico, dovetailing a photographic quest with northern migrations to the United States. Journeys intersect and converge in rail lines and resting places, built on forward motion and no going back. Frankfurter’s own family history informs her understanding that migration is no quick dash with a clear beginning and end, but rather is an ongoing drama with a far reach.

Destino. By Michelle Frankfurter.
FotoEvidence, 2014.
 
Destino
Reviewed by Karen Jenkins

Destino
By Michelle Frankfurter
FotoEvidence, 2014. 128 pp., 80 black & white illustrations, 9¾x9¾".


Since 2009, Michelle Frankfurter has traveled throughout Mexico, dovetailing a photographic quest with northern migrations to the United States. Journeys intersect and converge in rail lines and resting places, built on forward motion and no going back. Frankfurter’s own family history informs her understanding that migration is no quick dash with a clear beginning and end, but rather is an ongoing drama with a far reach. She is the daughter of migrants; her father escaped the Holocaust in Hungary by fleeing to Israel where he met her mother; together they eventually immigrated to America. Like the multi-generational story of which she is a part, Destino is less about individual sagas ending in the Promised Land, and more about an entrenched network of exiles in those treacherous places in between known ills and uncertain alternatives, harnessing faith and bravado to propel them along a circuitous path.


Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Valentina Abenavoli Valentina Abenavoli selects H. said he loved us by Tommaso Tanini as Book of the Week.
H. said he loved us by Tommaso Tanini.
Discipula Editions, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from Valentina Abenavoli who has selected H. said he loved us by Tommaso Tanini published by Discipula Editions.

Book Review Africa Junctions: Capturing the City By Lard Buurman Reviewed by Blake Andrews Africa Junctions: Capturing the City. The title of Lard Buurman's recent monograph says it all. At its most basic level, the book is comprised of photographs of African cities, fifteen of them strung across the continent. Buurman is fascinated with daily urban life and quotidian physical structure —"The commonplace remains my point of departure," he says.

Hajte Cantz, 2014.
 
Africa Junctions: Capturing the City
Reviewed by Blake Andrews

Africa Junctions: Capturing the City
By Lard Buurman
Hatje Cantz, 2014. 204 pp., 87 illustrations, 9¾x12x¾".


Africa Junctions: Capturing the City. The title of Lard Buurman's recent monograph says it all. At its most basic level, the book is comprised of photographs of African cities, fifteen of them strung across the continent. Buurman is fascinated with daily urban life and quotidian physical structure —"The commonplace remains my point of departure," he says. Thus his scenes lean toward the undramatic territory of Joe Deal, Stephen Shore, or Google Street View. Drab buildings, informal intersections, sprawling markets, anonymous inhabitants. In other words, it's the plain visual fabric of ordinary existence. Nothing is happening here, his photos seem to say, while begging the viewer to examine what's really happening.

Video Behind the Image - Superstition Mountain by Mitch Dobrowner Photographer Mitch Dobrowner discusses his image Monument Valley in his exhibition at photo-eye Gallery in Santa Fe, NM titled STILL EARTH | STORMS, on view through January 24, 2015.

Mitch Dobrowner – Monument Valley, 2014

There's just one more week to see Mitch Dobrowner's STILL EARTH | STORMS on view at photo-eye Gallery through January 24, 2015. In this new segment from our view interview with the photographer, Dobrowner discusses the making of the image Monument Valley in Utah's Canyonlands district. All of the new landscapes on view in STILL EARTH | STORMS are world debuts and are offered exclusively by photo-eye Gallery at this time.

photo-eye Gallery Nick Brandt - Behind the Photo: Petrified Bat, Lake Natron, 2012 In early May, Nick Brandt began posting the stories behind his beautiful and evocative portraits of African animals to his Facebook page. Brandt has graciously given us permission to reproduce them on photo-eye Blog. This week, Petrified Bat, Lake Natron, 2012.
In May of 2014, Nick Brandt began posting the stories behind his beautiful and evocative portraits of African animals to his Facebook page. Brandt has graciously given us permission to reproduce them on photo-eye Blog.



Book Review Lessons in Posing Subjects By Robert Heinecken Reviewed by Sarah Bradley Reproduced in its entirety for the first time, Robert Heinecken’s Lessons in Posing Subjects was part of a movement into a different type of work for the image appropriation master. The collection of early 1980s catalogue images have not just been repositioned, but actually re-photographed using a Polaroid SX-70. Reduced to their most necessary details, the catalogue of poses is fully annotated with commentary on effectiveness, pointing out flaws and proper technique.

Lessons in Posing Subjects. By Robert Heinecken.
WIELS & Triangle Books, 2014.
 
Lessons in Posing Subjects
Reviewed by Sarah Bradley

Lessons in Posing Subjects
By Robert Heinecken
WIELS & Triangle Books, 2014. 56 pp., color illustrations, 13½x10".

Reproduced in its entirety for the first time, Robert Heinecken’s Lessons in Posing Subjects was part of a movement into a different type of work for the image appropriation master. The collection of early 1980s catalogue images have not just been repositioned, but actually re-photographed using a Polaroid SX-70. Reduced to their most necessary details, the catalogue of poses is fully annotated with commentary on effectiveness, pointing out flaws and proper technique. The Polaroid images and design lend authority, as if they were test shots made and assembled into a manual from the set of a catalogue shoot. But of course, Lessons in Posing Subjects is satire, perhaps less about photography than the culture that produced these images.

Book Review A Field Guide to Snow and Ice By Paula McCartney Reviewed by Allie Haeusslein In 1928, Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley wrote in the New York Times “[t]he snow and the ice and the boar frost furnish brilliants that are incomparably more beautiful than the gems of the Summer dew or those wrought elsewhere in nature’s laboratory.” Entranced by the natural world, he made the first photograph of a snowflake in 1885 at the age of twenty.


A Field Guide to Snow and Ice. By Paula McCartney.
Silas Finch, 2014.
 
A Field Guide to Snow and Ice
Reviewed by Allie Haeusslein

A Field Guide to Snow and Ice
By Paula McCartney
Silas Finch, 2014. 48 pp., color illustrations, 8x10".

In 1928, Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley wrote in the New York Times “[t]he snow and the ice and the boar frost furnish brilliants that are incomparably more beautiful than the gems of the Summer dew or those wrought elsewhere in nature’s laboratory.”* Entranced by the natural world, he made the first photograph of a snowflake in 1885 at the age of twenty. Paula McCartney’s A Field Guide to Snow and Ice reflects a fascination and passion akin to Bentley’s for the unique and wide-ranging manifestations of frozen water vapor.

photo-eye Gallery Portfolio: Brad Wilson's Affinity photo-eye Gallery is pleased to announce Santa Fe photographer Brad Wilson as our newest represented artist. To celebrate the launch of Wilson's new portfolio, and welcome him to photo-eye, we asked Brad to detail two of his most memorable experiences during the course of the Affinity project.
Mountain Lion #1, Los Angeles, CA, 2011— Brad Wilson

photo-eye Gallery is pleased to announce Santa Fe photographer Brad Wilson as our newest represented artist. Last summer photo-eye was excited to host an exhibit of Wilson's stunningly detailed animal portraits entitled Avian: Selections from the Affinity Series at photo-eye Bookstore + Project Space. This exhibition corresponded with the worldwide launch of Wilson's first monograph entitled Wild Life, published by Prestel, including more than 70 full color plates from the Affinity series, and covering a diverse array of animals. A new portfolio showcasing images of mountain lions, mandrills, and servals — among others — is now available on the photo-eye gallery artist website.  For a more in-depth look at the Affinity series read Melanie McWhorter's 2014 interview with Brad Wilson on the photo-eye blog.


Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Espen R. Krukhaug Espen R. Krukhaug selects She Comes in Colors by Florian Braakman as Book of the Week.
She Comes in Colors by Florian Braakman.
Self-Published, 2014.
This week's Book of the Week pick comes from Espen R. Krukhaug who has selected She Comes in Colors self-published by Florian Braakman.

Book Review Land Without Past By Philipp Ebeling Reviewed by Adam Bell The erasure of individual and collective memory is often intertwined. Slow and cumulative, one image, one document or brick at a time until the illusion is complete and we’re left with blank spots or holes in the past. Phillips Ebeling’s Land Without Past deals with the painful erasure of one of the 20th centuries darkest moments.


Land Without Past. By Philipp Ebeling.
Fishbar, 2014.
Land Without Past
Reviewed by Adam Bell

Land Without Past
By Philipp Ebeling
Fishbar, 2014. 80 pp., illustrated throughout, 9¾x11".


The erasure of individual and collective memory is often intertwined. Slow and cumulative, one image, one document or brick at a time until the illusion is complete and we’re left with blank spots or holes in the past. Phillips Ebeling’s Land Without Past deals with the painful erasure of one of the 20th centuries darkest moments. In the wake of WWII, Germany was left not only physically devastated, but forced to reconcile with the crimes it had committed against its Jewish population and the world. For those who participated, a simple denial was often all that was needed to move on. Burn the pictures, rebuild, and forget what happened. For those born in the wake of WWII, the task was not so easy. As Ebeling’s title suggests, they were born into a country without a past, or with part of its recent history excised, glossed over and forgotten, much less discussed openly. Combining his own color images with archival family photographs, Ebeling’s powerful book offers a glimpse into the difficult task of looking backwards, but also living with and acknowledging a past long forgotten.

Video Behind the Image - Doll House by Mitch Dobrowner Photographer Mitch Dobrowner discusses his image Doll House in his exhibition at photo-eye Gallery in Santa Fe, NM titled STILL EARTH | STORMS, just extended through January 24, 2015.

Mitch Dobrowner, Doll House, 2014
photo-eye gallery is excited to announce STILL EARTH | STORMS, an exhibition of black and white photographs depicting Western American landscapes and Midwestern skies by Mitch Dobrowner, has been extended through January 24, 2015. Douglas Fairfield of photograph magazine notes, "Dobrowner’s black-and-white pictures of rugged mesas and mountainscapes interspersed amid desolate expanses of desert are real, though they have a timeless quality that taps into the realm of the sublime. Not unlike the sense of awe and wonder one recalls from photographs by Ansel Adams and Minor White, Dobrowner’s pictures invite contemplation." Read the full review on photograph magazine's website. Haniya Rae of Artsy Editorials sees a more conceptual approch to the contrasting images of rolling skies and solid rock, stating "though we take geological formations for granted, and expect them to be a part of our landscape for thousands of years to come, Dobrowner might subtly be suggesting that erosion and change are constantly occurring, and as a photographer, he intends to capture this scenery as it is, and preserve its inspiring views for prosperity." Read the full write up here.

In the video interview, Dobrowner details both thoughts and experiences behind the creation his brand new image Doll House, made in Canyonlands Utah last Fall. For Dobrowner reverence and respect are in mind as he seeks to capture the beauty and majesty of a natural rock formation millions of years in the making. All of the new landscapes on view in STILL EARTH | STORMS are world debuts and are offered exclusively by photo-eye Gallery at this time.



View more work by Mitch Dobrowner

For more information about STILL EARTH | STORMS, or for print sales, please contact Gallery Director Anne Kelly at 505.988.5152 ext.121 or anne@photoeye.com.

Book Review The Whale's Eyelash Edited by Timothy Prus Reviewed by Sarah Bradley There is no chance I could blunder into a description of this book better than its own: “The Whale’s Eyelash is a play written through the medium of 19th century microscope slides. The men who made these slides were known as mounters. Each slide contains a specific dramatic moment in a universe of its own, and together they tell the story of the Whale’s Eyelash — a story about what happens between the appearance of humankind and its passing away.”

The Whale's Eyelash. Edited by Timothy Prus.
AMC Books, 2014.
 
The Whale's Eyelash
Reviewed by Sarah Bradley

The Whale's Eyelash
Edited by Timothy Prus
AMC Books, 2014. 192 pp., 7½x9½".


There is no chance I could blunder into a description of this book better than its own: “The Whale’s Eyelash is a play written through the medium of 19th century microscope slides. The men who made these slides were known as mounters. Each slide contains a specific dramatic moment in a universe of its own, and together they tell the story of the Whale’s Eyelash — a story about what happens between the appearance of humankind and its passing away.”

Book Review Long Branch By Michael Ashkin Reviewed by Allie Haeusslein Since the late 1800s, the United States federal government has possessed the power of eminent domain — the ability to seize private property for approved public uses. This governmental authority first materialized to facilitate transportation, supply water, construct public buildings and aid in defense readiness — all necessary for a developing nation’s infrastructure.


Long Branch By Michael Ashkin.
A-Jump Books, 2014.
 
Long Branch
Reviewed by Allie Haeusslein

Long Branch
By Michael Ashkin
A-Jump Books, 2014. 144 pp., 89 duotone illustrations, 8½x6¾".


Since the late 1800s, the United States federal government has possessed the power of eminent domain — the ability to seize private property for approved public uses. This governmental authority first materialized to facilitate transportation, supply water, construct public buildings and aid in defense readiness — all necessary for a developing nation’s infrastructure. The use of eminent domain has, however, become highly contentious over the years. With the help of corrupt local governments, corporate interests have exploited the vague definition of eminent domain, exploiting terms like “the public good” and “blighted land” to take neighborhoods and even entire cities for private gain. As Sandra Day O’Connor articulated in her dissenting opinion for a now infamous property rights case, “[t]he specter of condemnation hangs over all property. Nothing is to prevent the State from replacing any Motel 6 with a Ritz-Carlton, any home with a shopping mall, or any farm with a factory.”

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Jon Feinstein Jon Feinstein selects Tar Beach Blind by Curtis Hamilton as Book of the Week.
Tar Beach Blind by Curtis Hamilton.
S_U_N_, 2014.

This week's Book of the Week pick comes from Jon Feinstein who has selected Tar Beach Blind by Curtis Hamilton published by S_U_N_.

Book Review Grand Circle Diego By Cyril Costilhes Reviewed by Colin Pantall Let’s start at the back of the book. The text sets out the story. It begins eleven years ago, as Cyril Costilhes attempts to get into the head of his troubled father and the expat excuse of a life he is leading on the Indian Ocean.

Grand Circle Diego. By Cyril Costilhes.
Akina, 2014.
Grand Circle Diego
Reviewed by Colin Pantall

Grand Circle Diego
By Cyril Costilhes
Akina, London, England, 2014. 144 pp., 81 color illustrations, 6¼x9".


Let’s start at the back of the book. The text sets out the story. It begins eleven years ago, as Cyril Costilhes attempts to get into the head of his troubled father and the expat excuse of a life he is leading on the Indian Ocean.

Diego Suarez, Tuesday the 26th August 2003

‘My father is riding his motorbike back home. He just had lunch with friends on a idyllic beach of Diego Suarez, far north of Madagascar…’

‘Was he thinking of “Le Grand Cercle De Diego,” his casino business, his associates, scams, whores, flies on dead meat. Maybe worried about the son he wished he had, the daughter he loved so much, or feeling remorse about the failed marriage.’


photo-eye Gallery Nick Brandt - Behind the Photo: Giraffes in Evening Light, Maasai Mara, 2006 In May 2014, Nick Brandt began posting the stories behind his beautiful and evocative portraits of African animals to his Facebook page. Brandt has graciously given us permission to reproduce them on photo-eye Blog. This week, Giraffes in Evening Light, Maasai Mara, 2006.
In May of 2014, Nick Brandt began posting the stories behind his beautiful and evocative portraits of African animals to his Facebook page. Brandt has graciously given us permission to reproduce them on photo-eye Blog.

Giraffes In Evening Light, Maasai Mara, 2006 — Nick Brandt


Book Review Photographers' Sketchbooks By Stephen McLaren and Bryan Formhals Reviewed by Blake Andrews When I was younger I kept a series of written journals. They were more like scrapbooks, actually. I would scribble in them and also paste in clippings, stubs, photos, and any ephemera that felt meaningful. I was a regular Dan Eldon. When computers became personalized I shifted to word processing. This was easier than scrapbooking although perhaps less whimsical.

Photographers' Sketchbooks. By Stephen McLaren and Bryan Formhals.
W W Norton & Company Inc, New York, 2014.
 
Photographers' Sketchbooks
Reviewed by Blake Andrews

Photographers' Sketchbooks
By Stephen McLaren and Bryan Formhals
W W Norton & Company Inc, New York, 2014. 320 pp., 600 color and black & white illustrations, 11¾x8½".


When I was younger I kept a series of written journals. They were more like scrapbooks, actually. I would scribble in them and also paste in clippings, stubs, photos, and any ephemera that felt meaningful. I was a regular Dan Eldon. When computers became personalized I shifted to word processing. This was easier than scrapbooking although perhaps less whimsical. The chief advantage was that my work wasn't dead on a page. I could revisit material and edit easily.

Books photo-eye's Bestsellers of 2014 photo-eye's 10 best selling photobooks of the year.



1.    On This Earth, A Shadow Falls
       By Nick Brandt
       Abrams Books/Big Life Editions








Book Review The Way to the Golden Mountain By Xiaoxiao Xu Reviewed by Janelle Lynch Photographer Xiaoxiao Xu was born in the village of Gangtou and raised in the nearby city of Wenzhou. In 1999, when Xu was 15 years old, she and her family moved to The Netherlands. Ten years later, after finishing her studies at Amsterdam’s Fotoacademie, she returned to China for the first time.

STRUM & DRANG, 2014.
 
The Way to the Golden Mountain
Reviewed by Janelle Lynch

The Way to the Golden Mountain
By Xiaoxiao Xu
STURM & DRANG, 2014. 104 pp., 49 color illustrations, 8¾x8½".


Photographer Xiaoxiao Xu was born in the village of Gangtou and raised in the nearby city of Wenzhou. In 1999, when Xu was 15 years old, she and her family moved to The Netherlands. Ten years later, after finishing her studies at Amsterdam’s Fotoacademie, she returned to China for the first time. The Way to the Golden Mountain, her second book, includes images she made during her month-long stay in Wenzhou and those she made four years later during her month-long stay in Gangtou.

Book of the Week Book of the Week: A Pick by Jennifer Schwartz Jennifer Schwartz selects The Last Road North by Ben Huff as Book of the Week.
The Last Road North by Ben Huff.
Kehrer Verlag, 2015.


This week's Book of the Week pick comes from Jennifer Schwartz who has selected The Last Road North by Ben Huff published by Kehrer Verlag.

Book Review Sudden Flowers By Eric Gottesman Reviewed by Adam Bell In our overly commoditized art world that fetishizes authorship and individual genius, it is often difficult to define a work of collective art. The answer defies the market-centric logic of most contemporary art, and often has more lasting power than any high priced print, painting, or sculpture.


Sudden Flowers. By Eric Gottesman.
Fishbar, 2014.
Sudden Flowers
Reviewed by Adam Bell

Sudden Flowers
By Eric Gottesman
Fishbar, 2014.

In our overly commoditized art world that fetishizes authorship and individual genius, it is often difficult to define a work of collective art. The answer defies the market-centric logic of most contemporary art, and often has more lasting power than any high priced print, painting, or sculpture. Sudden Flowers by Eric Gottesman is a unique book and document that only hints at the larger and more important work it records. Founded in 1999, Sudden Flowers is the name of an artistic collective based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and coordinated by Gottesman for children whose parents have died of AIDS related illness. For almost fifteen years, the collective has created photographs and films that document their lives, imagine their futures, and deal with personal trauma. Gathering together photographs, letters, transcribed text, and stills, Sudden Flowers offers a sampling of the incredible work done by the group. While the book cannot contain the real work done by the collective, the images and text offer a glimpse into the transformative effect the collective has had on the kids’ extraordinary lives.

Books Best Books of 2014: Reviews and Interviews Part 4 A collection of reviews and interviews on some of the Best Books of 2014.
The Lines
By Edward Ranney

Selected as one of the Best Books of 2014 by:
Melanie McWhorter

"The Lines is a small and very handsome excerpt from Ranney’s geoglyph photographs, 44 black-and-white images from a much larger practice that covers archaeological sites and monuments along the Andean coastline. The images are printed in tritone on paper that was first varnished to ensure that the ink did not soak too far into the paper. The warm matte finish of the pages allows your eyes to rest easily on the work for long periods of time under various light conditions."—From the review by William L. Fox

Books Best Books of 2014: Reviews and Interviews Part 3 A collection of reviews and interviews on some of the Best Books of 2014.
Fractal State of Being
By Sara Skorgan Teigen

Selected as one of the Best Books of 2014 by:
Sarah Bradley
Christopher J. Johnson
Melanie McWhorter

"For Teigen, the process is about recursion; motifs of hatched lines and tendrils of hair, seaweed and fractal-like natural forms embellish and expand the photographs outwards, repeating across pages, but also on the body depicted in the photographs — marks on the body, marks on the photographs, marks on the page. Tape both holds the images in place and creates another surface and type of mark to play with."—From the review by Sarah Bradley 

Book Review Cairo Diary By Peter Bialobrzeski Reviewed by Christopher J Johnson “Red, green, blue, yellow/ Red, green, blue, yellow,” begins the CocoRosie song Joseph City; as if entering a city by car or walking through it on foot what we see, people aside, is a style defined by a repetition of architectural taste, regional allegiances and color. Color can define a city in unexpected ways, we often know when we’re looking at a humid, temperate, or arid place based on the colors present.

Cairo Diary. By Peter Bialobrzeski.
The Velvet Cell, 2014.
 
Cairo Diary
Reviewed by Christopher J. Johnson

Cairo Diary
By Peter Bialobrzeski
The Velvet Cell, 2014. 104 pp., 50 color illustrations, 5¼x8".

“Red, green, blue, yellow/ Red, green, blue, yellow,” begins the CocoRosie song Joseph City; as if entering a city by car or walking through it on foot what we see, people aside, is a style defined by a repetition of architectural taste, regional allegiances and color. Color can define a city in unexpected ways, we often know when we’re looking at a humid, temperate, or arid place based on the colors present. Duller hues in the desert, richer hues on a tropical island; it is likely sun and water that lead to these variables; fabrics that have absorbed more water are deeper and darker, while those which retain none are more subtle and often sun-faded; to this add the fact that a city’s face is always exposed. Ever more than the people that it shelters, a city bolsters the days and nights, the extremes of cold and hot and the sun.


Book Review The Homestage By Jessica Todd Harper Reviewed by David Ondrik The Home Stage is a tender book of family photographs that refine the personal style of Jessica Todd Harper’s first book, Interior Exposure. In The Home Stage, the domestic scenes of twenty-somethings have morphed into domestic scenes of newish parents adapting to life with children.

The Home Stage. By Jessica Todd Harper.
Damiani, 2014.
 
The Home Stage
Reviewed by David Ondrik

The Home Stage
Photographs by Jessica Todd Harper
Damiani, 2014. 112 pp., illustrated throughout, 11x9½".


The Home Stage is a tender book of family photographs that refine the personal style of Jessica Todd Harper’s first book, Interior Exposure. In The Home Stage, the domestic scenes of twenty-somethings have morphed into domestic scenes of newish parents adapting to life with children. The images are so well done that they should engage even those who are not usually seduced by pastoral photographs of charming urchins and glowing parents.